Wildlife Science Seminar: Spring 2017 Schedule

Professor Emeritus Christian Grue from the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences is leading the Wildlife Science Seminar this spring, and he has lined up another compelling slate of speakers and topics, ranging from Magellanic penguins and beluga whales to the need for critical thinking in an era of alternative facts, fake news and fake science!

The public is always invited, and the talks are held on Mondays from 3:30 to 4:50 p.m. in Kane Hall 120. (Undergraduates may register for credit under ESRM 455; graduate students under ESRM 554).

So check out the schedule below, and join us for as many talks as you can!

Week 1: March 27
“Resource waves, time constraints, and predator-prey interactions in a landscape context”
Professor Daniel Schindler, School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences

Week 2: April 3
“Bachelor birds: Female-biased mortality contributes to Magellanic penguin population decline”
Natasha Gowarnis, Research Associate, UW Department of Biology

Week 3: April 10
“Derelict fishing gear in Puget Sound: Environmental impact and prevention”
Rich Childers, Director, Northwest Straits Commission

Week 4: April 17
“Working to conserve and protect wolves and their habitat”
Diane Gallegos, Executive Director, Wolf Haven International

Week 5: April 24
“Modeling management: Population estimation and simulation for decision making”
Sarah Converse, Leader, Washington Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, University of Washington

Week 6: May 1
“Alteration of prey behavior by a novel predator: The case of the federally threatened Oregon spotted frog and the American bullfrog”
Marc Hayes, Senior Research Scientist, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Week 7: May 8
“Shifts in beluga whale migration, habitat and behavior in a changing Pacific Arctic”
Donna Hauser, Research Associate, Applied Physics Laboratory, Polar Ice Center, University of Washington

Week 8: May 15
“Efforts to recover large carnivores in Washington state”
Mitch Friedman, Executive Director, Conservation Northwest

Week 9: May 22
“Critical thinking in an era of alternative facts, fake news and fake science”
Professor Carl Bergstrom, UW Department of Biology, and Professor Jevin West, UW Information School

Wildlife Science Seminar: Winter 2017 Schedule

This winter, Professor Laura Prugh is leading the long-running Wildlife Science Seminar, and she has lined up a fantastic slate of speakers. Subjects range from the Florida panther to golden eagles to the effects of fungal diseases on wildlife communities, so take a look at the schedule below and join us for as many talks as you can!

Wildlife Science SeminarThe talks are held on Mondays from 3:30 to 4:50 p.m. in Smith Hall 120, and the public is always welcome. (Undergraduate students may register for credit under ESRM 455; graduate students under SEFS 554. welcome.)

Week 1: January 9
“Wildlife conservation in Washington’s Cascades: a paradigm shift in the role of national parks”
Dr. Jason Ransom, National Park Service, North Cascades National Park

Week 2: January 16
No seminar

Week 3: January 23
“Spatial ecology of coyotes and cougars: Understanding the influence of multiple prey on the spatial interactions of two predators”
Dr. Peter Mahoney, Postdoctoral Research Associate, SEFS

Week 4: January 30
“Genetic introgression as a conservation strategy: past, present and future of the Florida panther”
Dr. Madelon Van de Kerk, Postdoctoral Research Associate, SEFS

Week 5: February 6
“Breeding ecology of golden eagles in western Washington”
Leif Hansen, Graduate Student, Wildlife Science Group, SEFS

Week 6: February 13
“Is the sky falling or is there an elephant in the room? Perspectives on how fungal diseases influence communities and population dynamics”
Dr. Tara Chestnut, National Park Service, Mt. Rainier National Park

Week 7: February 20
No seminar

Week 8: February 27
“American crow vocal behavior”
Loma Pendergraft, Graduate Student, Wildlife Science Group, SEFS

Week 9: March 6
“Megaherbivory, trophic control, and plant defensive landscapes in a savanna ecosystem”
Professor Jacob Goheen, University of Wyoming

Wildlife Seminar: Winter 2016 Schedule

The Wildlife Science Group at SEFS is proud to announce the Winter 2016 line-up for the long-running Wildlife Science Seminar (ESRM 455 & SEFS 554), which kicks off this afternoon with Professor Laura Prugh. As always, the speakers will be covering an incredible range of subjects, from snow leopard conservation in Central Asia to salmon predation and pileated woodpeckers.

You can catch the talks Mondays from 3:30 to 4:50 p.m. in Smith Hall 120. The public is always welcome, so mark your calendars and come out for some fantastic seminars!

Wildlife Science SeminarWeek 1: January 4
“Enemies with benefits: Integrating positive and negative interactions among terrestrial carnivores”
Professor Laura Prugh, SEFS

Week 2: January 11
“Top carnivores on the roof of the world: Ecology and conservation of snow leopards and wolves in the mountains of Central Asia”
Shannon Kachel, SEFS doctoral student

Week 3: January 18
No class (Martin Luther King Jr. Day)

Week 4: January 25
“Carnivore research and conservation in the North Cascades”
Dr. Robert Long, Senior Conservation Fellow, Woodland Park Zoo, Seattle

Week 5: February 1
“Linking camera trapping and genetic sampling to study elusive wild cats: insights into carnivore ecology”
Professor Marcella Kelly, Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Tech

Week 6: February 8
“Alien vs. Predator: Determining the factors that influence salmon predation in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta”
Dr. Joseph Smith, UW School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences

Week 7: February 15
No class (Presidents’ Day)

Week 8: February 22
“Estimation of an unobservable transition: From dependence to weaning in the California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus)”
Jeff Harris, SEFS master’s student

Week 9: February 29
Talk TBD
Jack Delap, SEFS doctoral candidate

Week 10: March 7
“Pileated woodpecker habitat dynamics in a managed forest”
Amber Mount, SEFS master’s student