2016 RFP: McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry Research Funding

The Institute of Forest Resources is proud to announce the annual McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry Research program 2016 request for proposals. Full details are available online, and below are the highlights of this year’s RFP:

•           In this RFP, we will fund three or more projects, each one or two years in length;
•           Awards will be available for projects beginning September 16, 2016;
•           Each award will be limited to $55,000 per year in McIntire-Stennis funding;
•           Dollar for dollar cost sharing is required;
•           Once again we are requesting Letters of Intent (LOIs) rather than full proposals in the first round;
•           The Research Committee will review the LOIs and invite several applicants to submit full proposals;
•           Letters of Intent are due by 5 p.m. on Friday, February 5, 2016.

If you have any questions, or would like to request a budget example or submission template, please contact Laura Davis at ldavis@uw.edu or 206.543.8975.

2016 McIntire-Stennis Research Grant Winners

This fall, the Institute of Forest Resources awarded five Graduate Research Augmentation Grants through the McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry Research program, totaling $72,209 in funding.

This special round of grants was designed to support graduate student research, with awards targeted for Spring 2016 or Summer 2016 (and with all funding to be spent in full by September 30, 2016). Read more about the funded projects below!

Awarded Projects

1. Nisqually Garry Oak Habitat: Cultural and Ecological Considerations for Successful Restoration in the Nisqually Tribal Reservation

PI: Professor Ernesto Alvarado, SEFS
Co-PI: Professor Steve Harrell, SEFS

Garry oak (Quercus garryana) ecosystems are a designated Priority Habitat for management in Washington State (Larsen and Morgan 1998). Although there are many research projects that examine how to restore Garry oak ecosystems for the purposes of establishing more habitat for endangered and threatened species like the golden paintbrush (Castilleja levisecta) and Mazama pocket gopher (Thomomys mazama), respectively (Larsen and Morgan 1998), there are few studies that look at restoration for the objective of developing an environment for the purpose of cultural restoration, specifically agroforestry. We intend to evaluate whether Garry oak ecosystem restoration for the intended purpose of cultural activities (traditional medicinal and edible plant harvests, inter-generational education) will greatly change the components of the restoration and management plan of the Garry oak ecosystem.

Award total: $13,232

2. How Do Conclusions About the Effectiveness of Fuels-reduction Treatments Vary with the Spatial Scale of Observation?

PI: Professor Jon Bakker, SEFS
Co-PI: Professor Charles Halpern, SEFS

Restoration of dry-forest ecosystems has become a prominent and very pressing natural resource issue in the western U.S. Although mechanical thinning and prescribed burning can effectively reduce fuel loads in these forests, scientists and managers remain uncertain about the ecological outcomes of these treatments. This uncertainty reflects the short time spans of most restoration studies and a limited consideration of how ecological responses vary with the spatial scale of observation. This funding will support graduate student research that explores how ecological responses to fuels-reduction treatments vary with the spatial scale of observation, and will complement ongoing research on the temporal variability of responses.

Award total: $15,114

3. Growth and Physiological Response of Native Washington Tree Species to Light and Drought: Informing Sustainable Timber Production

PI: Professor Greg Ettl, SEFS
Co-PIs: Matthew Aghai, third-year Ph.D. student at SEFS; Rolf Gersonde, affiliate assistant professor with SEFS and Seattle Public Utilities Silviculture; and Professor Sally Brown, SEFS

Intensive management of the conifer-dominated forests of the Pacific Northwest has resulted in millions of acres of largely mono-specific second- and third-growth forests. These forests have simple vertical structure and low biodiversity, and consequently much lower value of non-timber forest products. Research on establishment of underplanted trees in partial light is needed to increase structural and compositional diversification of Douglas-fir plantations undergoing conversion to multispecies stands. However, the ecology of seedling establishment under existing canopies is poorly understood. The general aim of our research is to address the need for improved structural diversity in managed forest systems through a better understanding of species-specific performance potential of underplanted seedlings. This proposal extends ongoing research; in this phase we will document physiological differences in seedling performance.

Award total: $17,004

4. A Novel Reactor for Fast Pyrolysis of Beetle-Killed Trees

PI: Professor Fernando Resende, SEFS

In this project, we will optimize the production of pyrolysis bio-oil from beetle-killed lodgepole pine using a technique called ablative pyrolysis. We developed a novel and unique system for pyrolysis of wood that has the capability of converting entire wood chips into bio-oil. This characteristic is important for mobile pyrolysis units, because it eliminates the need of grinding wood chips prior to pyrolysis.

Award total: $15,887

5. Modeling the Effects of Forest Management on Snowshoe Hare Population Dynamics in Washington at the Landscape Scale

PI: Professor Aaron Wirsing, SEFS

The Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) is already listed as Threatened in Washington and, following an ongoing status review, likely to be designated as Endangered because much of its habitat has been lost to a series of large wildfires since 2006. Lynx subsist on snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus), and it is widely acknowledged that habitat quality for lynx is tied to the availability of this prey species, so forest management with the goal of promoting lynx conservation requires an understanding of the relationship between silvicultural practices and hare abundance. Accordingly, we are requesting summer 2016 funds to complete the third and final phase of a graduate research project whose objective is to assess the impacts of forest management on hare numbers across a large landscape in north-central Washington. By sampling a network of snowshoe hare fecal pellet transects spanning protected and harvested portions of the Loomis State Forest for a third consecutive summer, we will produce a model of hare relative abundance that will enable managing agencies to tailor their harvest plans such that they promote snowshoe hare availability and, as a result, lynx population persistence.

Award total: $10,972

Request for Targeted Proposals: Graduate Research Augmentation Grants

The Institute of Forest Resources has issued a special request for proposals through the McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry Research program. This special RFP will cover small, one-quarter awards that support graduate student research.

• Awards will be available for one of the following quarters: Spring 2016 or Summer 2016.
• Each award will be in the $10,000 to $25,000 range.
• All awarded funds must be spent in full by September 30, 2016.
Applications are due by 5 p.m. on Friday, November 20, 2015.

Check out the full details for this special RFP, and watch for the regular McIntire-Stennis RFP later this quarter. It will fund larger, one- and two-year proposals that will begin in fall quarter 2016.

2015 McIntire-Stennis Grant Winners

For 2015, the Institute of Forest Resources (IFR) issued four grants through the McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry Research program, totaling $359,477 in funding. All projects are two years in length, and below are more details about the principal investigators and summaries for each proposal.

(The RFP for McIntire-Stennis funding for projects beginning fall 2016 will be available later this quarter.)

1. Potential Soil Carbon Stocks and Turnover Across Privately Operated Forest Stands in the Pacific Northwest: Understanding the Radiocarbon Age, Quality and Lability of Soil Organic Carbon Within Douglas-Fir Plantations.

PI: Professor David Butman
Co-PI: Professor Rob Harrison

In this study, we will look at how altered landscapes, whether through natural disturbance or human land management, affect the storage and processing of carbon in soils. We will characterize the radiocarbon age and biolability of leachable soil organic carbon obtained across a climate and soil parent material gradient in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) as part of a research collaboration with the UW Stand Management Cooperative (SMC). We hypothesize that soil properties and changes in both annual precipitation and temperature regimes will alter the presence, lability and carbon quality of aged soil organic carbon across depths. We are defining quality by the abundance of aromatic carbon structures inferred from absorbance and fluorescence spectrophotometry in the context of carbon lability. These results will provide new information to better manage forest resources in the PNW for carbon storage over short and long periods and will provide new information on the impacts of stand management on soil organic carbon dynamics currently being researched within the SMC.

Award total:  $96,481

2. Metal Deposition Along an Urban-Wildland Gradient in the Puget Sound Region

PI: Director Tom DeLuca
Co-PI: Professor Patrick Tobin

Vehicle emissions associated with exhaust, lubricants, and tire and brake attrition represent a major form of pollution in busy urban centers in the Pacific Northwest; however, few studies have focused on characterizing the extent and impact of metal emissions from vehicle traffic on forest bryophytes and ecosystem health. We will evaluate whether metal deposition associated with the transportation sector in the Puget Sound region is altering ecosystem function by influencing forest bryophytes and their associated food webs.

Award total: $88,981

3. Market and Environmental Assessment of Cross-Laminated Timber Production in the Olympic Peninsula: Mid-Rise Non-Residential Construction Application.

PI: Professor Indroneil Ganguly
Co-PIs: Professors Ivan Eastin and Kate Simonen

Cross-laminated timber (CLT), a new generation of engineered wood product, has been gaining popularity in low to mid-rise residential and non-residential construction in several countries, including Europe and Canada. CLT is a cost-competitive and wood-based solution that is a suitable substitute for construction applications that currently use concrete, masonry and steel. We will develop a comprehensive market feasibility assessment for manufacturing CLT in the Olympic Peninsula with a focus on the mid-rise nonresidential green building industry in the Pacific Northwest. We will explore economic avenues for increasing forest resource utilization while developing a regional forest industry on the Olympic Peninsula.

Award total:  $98,846

4. Biomass Equations for Coastal Douglas-Fir by Stand Density, Age, Relative Dominance, and Location

PI: Professor Eric Turnblom
Co-PI: Professor Rob Harrison

We will develop a set of equations that describe biomass accumulation and distribution (in terms of stem wood and bark, branches, and foliage) for coastal Douglas-fir in the Pacific Northwest. We have planned for destructive sampling of replicated trees at each level of all factors—density, age, relative dominance, and location—which will yield an orthogonal experimental design with 24 trees sampled in total. We expect the project to yield a set of equations describing above‐ground biomass (by listed components), while the database produced will subsequently be used to develop equations for stem taper, crown morphology, specific gravity along the stem, and other measures of wood quality. The models produced by this study will assist managers in determining how silviculture/ management alternatives affect biomass distribution and related economic and ecologic objectives. The study complements concurrent research by the principal investigator set to yield an analogous set of equations for western hemlock.

Award total:  $75,169

McIntire‐Stennis Cooperative Forestry Research Funding: 2015 RFP

The Institute of Forest Resources is currently reviewing letters of intent (LOI) for funding through the McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry Research program. The 2015 RFP is available online, and the research committee is currently reviewing projects. The next step will be a request for selected investigators to submit full proposals by January 16, 2015.

SEFS Faculty Update Legislature on Research Progress

On Wednesday, March 12, four SEFS faculty members made presentations before the Washington State House Committee on Agriculture and Natural Resources in Olympia, Wash. They were updating the committee on three research projects that are partially supported by McIntire-Stennis funds.

Download the PowerPoint presentations, including a general update on the Institute:

UW Institute of Forest Resources Overview, Professor Bruce Bare
CINTRAFOR Projects on International Trade, Professor Ivan Eastin
Assessing the Feasibility of a Wolf Economy for Washington, Professor John Marzluff
Washington Hardwoods Assessment, Professor John Perez-Garcia

IFR 2013 Progress Report

We wish to provide a brief update on what the UW Institute of Forest Resources (IFR) has been doing during the past several months.

Most recently, we were excited last week to announce the completion of the 2013 Western Washington Hardwood Assessment. With funding from the Washington Hardwoods Commission and IFR, researchers Luke Rogers, John Perez-Garcia and B. Bruce Bare produced a new assessment of Washington State’s hardwood resources, including estimates as of 2010 and projections through 2030.

IFR Progress Report for 2013The hardwood assessment is one of six research proposals IFR is currently funding for 2013 and 2014. In the autumn of 2012, we solicited pre-proposals from SEFS faculty and ultimately selected six projects to fund. During a two-year period, these projects total about $1.5 million in research investment (using a combination of our McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry funds and a 1-1 match from project collaborators). We are very pleased that all funded projects have active partners from across the state and include public agencies, private organizations and NGOs.

In January and February 2013, we presented updates on these projects (in PowerPoint) to the Washington State House of Representatives, Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee, and Washington State Senate, Natural Resources and Parks Committee. And as the five remaining projects produce research reports, we will keep you updated and make them available online.

Thank you for your continued interest and support!

IFR Announces Funding for Six Research Projects

This spring, the Institute of Forest Resources (IFR) awarded funding to six new research projects in Washington, ranging from the feasibility of a wolf economy, to restoring fire-prone forest ecosystems.

During a two-year period, total funding for the six projects is roughly $1.5 million, including federal funds provided by the McIntire-Stennis cooperative research program and the matching funds provided by project collaborators. Funding has been finalized for four of the six proposals, and is pending final approval from the National Institute of Food and Agriculture for the remaining two.

The six projects for 2013-14 include:

1. “Defining Desired Future Conditions for Restoration of Fire-Prone Forest Ecosystems: Lessons from the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program.” (Charles B. Halpern, Lauren S. Urgenson, Clare M. Ryan, Ernesto Alvarado and Jonathan D. Bakker).
Restoration of frequent- and mixed-fire regime forest ecosystems is a pressing natural resource issue in Washington State, as in much of the West. In 2009, the U.S. Forest Service established the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program (CFLRP) to facilitate forest restoration at a landscape scale. The program engages stakeholders from diverse groups—with differing goals and perspectives—in the design and implementation of large-scale forest restoration projects. This project has two overarching goals: first, to understand how CFLRP collaboratives in the inland Northwest (and beyond) achieve consensus in defining desired future conditions; and second, to distill this understanding as a set of “best practices” that can assist forest managers and collaborative-group members in this process.

Trade Policy2. “Assessing the Impact of Trade Policies on the Competitiveness of Wood Exports from Washington State.” (Ivan Eastin and Indroneil Ganguly).
Recently, a large number of new laws, regulations, policies and programs have been adopted around the Pacific Rim that could significantly affect the specification, use and trade of wood products from Washington State. This study will implement a program of research and extension activities designed to assist small and medium-sized wood products companies and Native American tribal enterprises to understand and adapt to these changing market conditions.

3. “Finding Common Ground Toward the Resolution of a Forest Management Dispute.” (Stanley T. Asah and E. David Ford).
Management of the Olympic Experimental State Forest (OESF) is important to a range of interested parties. This project will implement a research program to better understand and inform the resolution of the dispute about how the OESF is currently managed, and to outline key areas of consensus and disagreement about how the forest should be managed in the future. In light of the Olympic Natural Resources Center’s role as a neutral forum for addressing management challenges, the aim of this study is to facilitate the management of the OESF in ways that are not only ecologically sound but are also culturally, politically and socio‐economically acceptable across the key stakeholder groups.

Biofuels Study4. “Climate Change and Washington State Biofuels Industry: Impacts and Critical Technical Innovations.” (Renata Bura, Richard Gustafson, Susan Bolton, Josh Lawler and Luke Rogers.)
Hardwood plantations are being established in the Pacific Northwest to provide feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals. However, water demand and water availability for the production of biofuels may be substantial, and water issues need to be investigated further before a commercial system is built out and formalized. The study will use an interdisciplinary approach to develop new technologies, and perform impact assessments for attaining sustainable biofuel production.

5. “Feasibility of a Wolf Economy for Washington.” (John Marzluff, Stanley Asah and Aaron Wirsing).
This project will engage stakeholders in the recovery of wolf numbers in Washington State to determine the feasibility, both social and economic, of developing a market that values a sustainable wolf population. Researchers will build on existing examples and citizen input to test two major components of a viable wolf economy: protecting rancher investments, and developing new markets that reward and compensate ranchers who coexist with wolves.

6. “Assessing the Status of Washington’s Hardwood Resource.” (B. Bruce Bare, John Perez-Garcia and Luke Rogers).
This study aims to calculate how much hardwood growing stock currently exists in Washington State; the age (or size) class structure and location of the inventory; the ownerships currently managing the growing stock; and the volume under riparian management regulations.

Photos © Institute of Forest Resources.