Agenda


Subject to change, updated June 12, 2018

 

Institute Agenda 2018

Monday, October 1, 2018

8:00 AM
Registration Desk Opens
8:00 – 9:00 AM
Continental Breakfast
9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Optional Pre-Institute Mini-Courses

 

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

7:40 AM
Registration Desk Opens
7:40 – 8:40 AM
Continental Breakfast
8:40 – 10:10 AM
GS 1
First General Session
The Year In Review
Julie Weatherly, Attorney at Law, owner, Resolutions in Special Education, Inc., Mobile, Alabama

It’s been another active year in the area of special education law since last year’s Institute! Although applicable federal laws have not changed recently, there continues to be an enormous amount of litigation going on, as courts and federal agencies attempt to interpret and apply the law’s provisions. In this session, Julie will update the audience on some of the significant special education “legal happenings” during the past year, with an overview of relevant court decisions and federal agency interpretations.

10:10 – 10:30 AM
Refreshment Break
10:30 – noon
Tuesday Morning Workshops
WS 1
Secton 504/ADA Update: Things to Know Right Now!
  Julie Weatherly, Attorney at Law, owner, Resolutions in Special Education, Inc., Mobile, Alabama

While Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act has been around since 1973, it has taken on a noticeable increase in popularity in the past decade, especially after its sister statute—the ADA— was amended in 2008.  Section 504 demands and OCR complaints have increased, and educators need to know how to respond to them.  This session will focus on ten of the top things that educators need to know about 504/ADA right now—ranging from 504 child find and placement errors to several kinds of disability discrimination issues.

WS 2
Supported Decision-Making: Protecting Rights, Ensuring Choices
  Jonathan Martinis, Senior Director for Law and Policy, The Burton Blatt Institute at Syracuse University, Washington D.C.

Many parents and teachers think that guardianship is the only option for students with disabilities. This session will teach you about Supported Decision-Making, where people with disabilities work with family, friends, and professionals to help them understand the situations they face and choices they must make so they can make their own decisions.  Supported Decision-Making can help students with disabilities avoid guardianship, direct their own lives, and improve their quality of life.  The session will also describe Supported Decision-Making cases, laws, and projects from around the United States.

WS 3
Planning for IEP Success!
  Mary Schillinger, Educational Consultant/ former Assistant Superintendent of Education, Collaboration for Success, Simi Valley, California

Successful IEP meetings don’t just happen by accident. Careful planning, connecting with parents, and knowing how to handle potential contentious issues are the key to productive and collaborative IEP meetings. Mary Schillinger, former special education director and assistant superintendent will share tips and strategies that are proven to be successful. Checklists and guidelines for managing tough issues including avoiding predetermination, responding to challenging advocates, as well as effective communication with parents including those who are non-English speaking, will be provided. No matter how many or how few IEPs you have attended, you will walk away from this presentation with new tools for your IEP success toolbox.

WS 4
Post-Secondary Education Programs for Students with Intellectual Disabilities: What Do You Need to Know?
  Joesph RyanDistinguished Professor, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina

Individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) face many daunting challenges in life regarding education, employment, wages earned, physical health, and independence. Particularly troubling is the area of employment. Recent studies report that employment rates for young adults with ID was merely18%. In addition, many individuals with ID also experience alarming health risks, with nearly half of all males (45%) and females (56%) with Down Syndrome suffering from obesity. One approach that has demonstrated success in increasing outcomes for individuals with ID has been participation in post-secondary education (PSE) programs. This session provides an opportunity for parents, teachers and students to understand the goal of PSE programs, with an in-depth overview of a PSE program’s curriculum, job skills training, social skills development, use of assistive technology, and community integration into a traditional college campus.

WS 5
Three Kids in a Car: Special Education Student Discipline
  Karen Haase, Attorney at Law, Principal, KSB School Law, Lincoln, Nebraska

What’s “three kids in a car all about,” you may ask? Well, school attorney Karen Haase will take you through a real life example of how difficult it is for schools, advocates, and parents (not to mention board members and community members) to understand the legal requirements of imposing student discipline for special education students. “Why did MY kid get a suspension but her kid didn’t?!” Karen will provide both educators and advocates with a refresher on the basics of student discipline of students receiving special education and related services, using practical advice from the best real-life hypothetical she’s ever seen.

WS 6
Medical Issues in Schools
  Darcy Kriha, Attorney at Law and Founding Partner, Kriha Law LLC, Chicago, Illinois

In this workshop, Darcy will discuss the increasingly complex nature of students’ medical needs in the school setting. Starting with the seminal 1999 U.S. Supreme Court case Cedar Rapids Community School District v. Garret F. and moving to present day, we will discuss common issues and concerns that arise in the school setting, including the possession and administration of medical cannabis. Bring your questions for an interactive and lively session!

WS 7 An Update on Recent 9th Circuit Decisions
 Jan Tomsky, Attorney at Law, Fagen Friedman & Fulfrost, Oakland, California

In this fast-paced presentation, Jan Tomsky offers an overview of the latest decisions issued by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals concerning the provision of services to students under the IDEA and Section 504. You will receive an analysis of the facts and the court’s rationale for each decision, as well as the practical implications of the case for special education providers.

WS 8
Social Maladjustment, Conduct Disorder, and an Emotional Disability
Zvi Greismann, Associate General Counsel, Office of the General Counsel, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, Maryland

Is poor behavior an emotional disability under the IDEA? What obligations does a school team have when a student is placed in a day or residential treatment center by another agency, a hospital, a court or the parents for a serious mental health concern?  What have the courts held and what are practice tips educators may use in navigating this process.

Noon-1:00 PM
Hosted Lunch
1:10 – 2:40 PM
Tuesday Afternoon Workshops
WS 1
Secton 504/ADA Update: Things to Know Right Now!
  Julie Weatherly, Attorney at Law, owner, Resolutions in Special Education, Inc., Mobile, Alabama
WS 4
Post-Secondary Education Programs for Students with Intellectual Disabilities: What Do You Need to Know?
  Joesph RyanDistinguished Professor, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina

Individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) face many daunting challenges in life regarding education, employment, wages earned, physical health, and independence. Particularly troubling is the area of employment. Recent studies report that employment rates for young adults with ID was merely18%. In addition, many individuals with ID also experience alarming health risks, with nearly half of all males (45%) and females (56%) with Down Syndrome suffering from obesity. One approach that has demonstrated success in increasing outcomes for individuals with ID has been participation in post-secondary education (PSE) programs. This session provides an opportunity for parents, teachers and students to understand the goal of PSE programs, with an in-depth overview of a PSE program’s curriculum, job skills training, social skills development, use of assistive technology, and community integration into a traditional college campus.

WS 5
Three Kids in a Car: Special Education Student Discipline
  Karen Haase, Attorney at Law, Principal, KSB School Law, Lincoln, Nebraska

What’s “three kids in a car all about,” you may ask? Well, school attorney Karen Haase will take you through a real life example of how difficult it is for schools, advocates, and parents (not to mention board members and community members) to understand the legal requirements of imposing student discipline for special education students. “Why did MY kid get a suspension but her kid didn’t?!” Karen will provide both educators and advocates with a refresher on the basics of student discipline of students receiving special education and related services, using practical advice from the best real-life hypothetical she’s ever seen.

WS 7
An Update on Recent 9th Circuit Decisions
   Jan Tomsky, Attorney at Law, Fagen Friedman & Fulfrost, Oakland, California

In this fast-paced presentation, Jan Tomsky offers an overview of the latest decisions issued by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals concerning the provision of services to students under the IDEA and Section 504. You will receive an analysis of the facts and the court’s rationale for each decision, as well as the practical implications of the case for special education providers.

WS 9
School Safety – the Role of School Resource Officers
  Darcy Kriha, Attorney at Law and Founding Partner, Kriha Law LLC, Chicago, Illinois

The topic of school safety is on everyone’s mind. School districts are grappling with a myriad of issues on the topic, not the least of which includes the responsibilities of School Resource Officers and other similar types of law enforcement professionals. In this session, we will focus on the role of the SRO as it relates to special education students. What can we share with SRO’s about a student’s disability? Does FERPA address what happens in an emergency situation? What special safety plans must be put in place for students who are medically fragile?

WS 10
Transition Planning: Creating A Culture of Coordinated Support
  Jonathan Martinis, Senior Director for Law and Policy, The Burton Blatt Institute at Syracuse University, Washington D.C.

Transition is a time to assemble the building blocks of adult education, employment, and independent living.  This season will help people, families, and professionals identify ways to Identifying and access supports and services in Special Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, Medicaid Waivers, and other programs.  We will also discuss practical ways to ensure that the supports are more coordinated, effective, and efficient.

WS 11
Endrew F., A Year Later
Zvi Greismann, Associate General Counsel, Office of the General Counsel, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, Maryland

Has the Supreme Court’s 2017 decision impacted court decisions on the provision of a free appropriate public education? A look into case law and its impact in the classroom.

WS 12
Using ABA to Create an Inclusive Learning Environment for Students with Autism
Mary Schillinger, Educational Consultant/ former Assistant Superintendent of Education, Collaboration for Success, Simi Valley, California and Mitch Taubman, Actum Clinical and Behavioral Services, Calabasas, California

Presented by nationally recognized researcher, author, and practitioner in Autism, Dr. Mitch Taubman, and, experienced Special Education administrator, presenter, and author, Mary Schillinger, this presentation will cover effective interventions and programming for successful inclusion in general education environments for students with autism at all grade levels.   Learn about solid, effective, and contemporary ABA techniques and programming that are research based, specific to the individual needs of each student, and legally defensible.  Find out how interfering behaviors can be replaced with appropriate skills for success within the general education classroom.  Use rubrics, checklists, and walk – through tools to determine areas of weakness in your programs, and ways to build your district’s capacity to support a rigorous, Endrew F. compliant, special education program for your students with autism.

2:40 – 3:00 PM
Refreshment Break
3:00 – 4:30 PM
Second General Session
 GS2
School Violence: What we know and don’t know on prevention and intervention: A community perspective
  Diana Browning Wright, V-STAG Trainer and Initiative Leader, Educational/Behavioral Consultant, DianaBrowningWright INC., Sierra Madre, California

Episodes of violence, including gun violence can occur throughout a community, inclusive of school settings. Ms. Wright will give an overview what we know about prevention and intervention involving all stakeholders.

4:30 – 6:00 PM
Hosted Networking Reception

Wednesday, October 3, 2018

7:30 AM
Registration Opens
7:30 – 8:15 AM
Continental Breakfast
8:15 – 9:45 AM
Wednesday Early Morning Workshops
WS 2
Supported Decision-Making: Protecting Rights, Ensuring Choices
  Jonathan Martinis, Senior Director for Law and Policy, The Burton Blatt Institute at Syracuse University, Washington D.C.

Many parents and teachers think that guardianship is the only option for students with disabilities. This session will teach you about Supported Decision-Making, where people with disabilities work with family, friends, and professionals to help them understand the situations they face and choices they must make so they can make their own decisions.  Supported Decision-Making can help students with disabilities avoid guardianship, direct their own lives, and improve their quality of life.  The session will also describe Supported Decision-Making cases, laws, and projects from around the United States.

WS 3
Planning for IEP Success!
  Mary Schillinger, Educational Consultant/ former Assistant Superintendent of Education, Collaboration for Success, Simi Valley, California

Successful IEP meetings don’t just happen by accident. Careful planning, connecting with parents, and knowing how to handle potential contentious issues are the key to productive and collaborative IEP meetings. Mary Schillinger, former special education director and assistant superintendent will share tips and strategies that are proven to be successful. Checklists and guidelines for managing tough issues including avoiding predetermination, responding to challenging advocates, as well as effective communication with parents including those who are non-English speaking, will be provided. No matter how many or how few IEPs you have attended, you will walk away from this presentation with new tools for your IEP success toolbox.

WS 6
Medical Issues in Schools
  Darcy Kriha, Attorney at Law and Founding Partner, Kriha Law LLC, Chicago, Illinois

In this workshop, Darcy will discuss the increasingly complex nature of students’ medical needs in the school setting. Starting with the seminal 1999 U.S. Supreme Court case Cedar Rapids Community School District v. Garret F. and moving to present day, we will discuss common issues and concerns that arise in the school setting, including the possession and administration of medical cannabis. Bring your questions for an interactive and lively session!

WS 8
Social Maladjustment, Conduct Disorder, and an Emotional Disability
  Zvi Greismann, Associate General Counsel, Office of the General Counsel, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, Maryland

Is poor behavior an emotional disability under the IDEA? What obligations does a school team have when a student is placed in a day or residential treatment center by another agency, a hospital, a court or the parents for a serious mental health concern?  What have the courts held and what are practice tips educators may use in navigating this process.

WS 13
Student Threat Assessment, V-STAG, an Evidence-based process according to SAMHSA
  Diana Browning Wright, V-STAG Trainer, Educational/Behavioral Consultant, DianaBrowningWright INC., Sierra Madre, California

Participants will be introduced to a school team process endorsed by SAMHSA that has proven effective in neither over nor under reacting to verbal, written or gestural threats of violence by students of all ages.

WS 14
An IEP Practicum: Writing Effective and Legal IEPs
  Paul Burton, Attorney & Counselor at Law, Judge Pro Tempore King, WA

This session will cover the basics of effective IEP’s that are effective for the disabled child and pass legal scrutiny in the event of challenges. Participants will be provided with an outline of positive attributes of effective IEPs and pitfalls to avoid based on recent Administrative Law and Court Decisions. Participants will then be provided with a fact laden scenario of a disabled child and work with other participants in teams to outline suggestions to the IEP team for inclusion in an effective IEP for the theoretical disabled child. Each team will then be given an evaluation tool to self evaluate their suggestions, resultant IEP, and share t wihose results with e the other participant teams. The evaluation tool provides general guidelines, necessary inclusions, and avoidable pitfalls and does not challenge in any way the knowledge and expertise of the participants’ suggestions or resulting IEP.

9:45 – 10:00 AM
Refreshment Break
10:00 – 11:30 AM
Wednesday Late Morning Workshops
WS 9
School Safety – the Role of School Resource Officers
  Darcy Kriha, Attorney at Law and Founding Partner, Kriha Law LLC, Chicago, Illinois

The topic of school safety is on everyone’s mind. School districts are grappling with a myriad of issues on the topic, not the least of which includes the responsibilities of School Resource Officers and other similar types of law enforcement professionals. In this session, we will focus on the role of the SRO as it relates to special education students. What can we share with SRO’s about a student’s disability? Does FERPA address what happens in an emergency situation? What special safety plans must be put in place for students who are medically fragile?

WS 10
Transition Planning: Creating A Culture of Coordinated Support
  Jonathan Martinis, Senior Director for Law and Policy, The Burton Blatt Institute at Syracuse University, Washington D.C.

Transition is a time to assemble the building blocks of adult education, employment, and independent living.  This season will help people, families, and professionals identify ways to Identifying and access supports and services in Special Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, Medicaid Waivers, and other programs.  We will also discuss practical ways to ensure that the supports are more coordinated, effective, and efficient.

WS 11
Endrew F., A Year Later
  Zvi Greismann, Associate General Counsel, Office of the General Counsel, Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, Maryland

Has the Supreme Court’s 2017 decision impacted court decisions on the provision of a free appropriate public education? A look into case law and its impact in the classroom.

WS 12
Using ABA to Create an Inclusive Learning Environment for Students with Autism
  Mary Schillinger, Educational Consultant/ former Assistant Superintendent of Education, Collaboration for Success, Simi Valley, California and Mitch Taubman, Actum Clinical and Behavioral Services, Calabasas, California

Presented by nationally recognized researcher, author, and practitioner in Autism, Dr. Mitch Taubman, and, experienced Special Education administrator, presenter, and author, Mary Schillinger, this presentation will cover effective interventions and programming for successful inclusion in general education environments for students with autism at all grade levels.   Learn about solid, effective, and contemporary ABA techniques and programming that are research based, specific to the individual needs of each student, and legally defensible.  Find out how interfering behaviors can be replaced with appropriate skills for success within the general education classroom.  Use rubrics, checklists, and walk – through tools to determine areas of weakness in your programs, and ways to build your district’s capacity to support a rigorous, Endrew F. compliant, special education program for your students with autism.

WS 13
Student Threat Assessment, V-STAG, an Evidence-based process according to SAMHSA
  Diana Browning Wright, V-STAG Trainer, Educational/Behavioral Consultant, DianaBrowningWright INC., Sierra Madre, California

Participants will be introduced to a school team process endorsed by SAMHSA that has proven effective in neither over nor under reacting to verbal, written or gestural threats of violence by students of all ages.

WS 14
An IEP Practicum: Writing Effective and Legal IEPs

Paul Burton, Attorney & Counselor at Law, Judge Pro Tempore King, WA

This session will cover the basics of effective IEP’s that are effective for the disabled child and pass legal scrutiny in the event of challenges. Participants will be provided with an outline of positive attributes of effective IEPs and pitfalls to avoid based on recent Administrative Law and Court Decisions. Participants will then be provided with a fact laden scenario of a disabled child and work with other participants in teams to outline suggestions to the IEP team for inclusion in an effective IEP for the theoretical disabled child. Each team will then be given an evaluation tool to self evaluate their suggestions, resultant IEP, and share t wihose results with e the other participant teams. The evaluation tool provides general guidelines, necessary inclusions, and avoidable pitfalls and does not challenge in any way the knowledge and expertise of the participants’ suggestions or resulting IEP.

 
11:30 AM

2017 Institute Adjourns