Posts Tagged ‘websites’

SepiaTown = Historical Photos + Architecture

Friday, July 29th, 2011

This website allows registered users to upload scanned historical images of architecture and map them. Visitors see thumbnails of the images on a map. You can click on the thumbnail to bring up a full image with information and then click on that image to get a larger one, which is big enough to use in PowerPoint. Note that, on the page with the smaller full image, there is a box towards the bottom with a permalink. This is good to note in the image title, PowerPoint notes, or elsewhere so that you have a record of the image source.

It is helpful to visit the “How to Use SepiaTown” page before delving in too far since there are some interesting features that may not be initially obvious. Two examples are the figure on the map that shows the location of the photographer and direction of view and the “Then/Now” button that shows a contemporary street view from the same perspective. Images for many cities from around the world have already been uploaded.

Yale Silk Road Database

Tuesday, January 4th, 2011

A database of over 6,000 images shot during Silk Road site seminars from 2006-2009. There are many ways to browse using categories at the left. Click through to the large images and download with a right-click (control-click on Mac). The large images vary in size, but many are 1000 pixels on the long side, which will work well for PowerPoint.

David Rumsey Map Collection

Monday, December 6th, 2010

The David Rumsey Map Collection is one of the premier collections of maps available online even though only a portion of this private collection has been digitized. You can access images in a variety of ways including Google Earth and Google Maps. However, if you are looking for images to download for teaching, launching the collection in the LUNA Browser is the best way to go. Tips for using the LUNA Browser are also provided. After finding an image you want, you can click on a thumbnail to bring up a larger image. Use the export button above the image to choose the size you want (small or medium will work well for PowerPoint). If you download the largest image size, you should be able to create your own details in any basic image editing software. To save groups of maps for future reference, you can create an account.

Sidney D. Gamble Photographs

Friday, November 12th, 2010

The Sidney D. Gamble Photographs collection at Duke University Libraries provides a wealth of historical images. Gamble travelled in China several times and also took photos in Japan, Korea, and Russia. Currently available on this site are his images from 1917-1932. One can browse the collection by place and subject. Since the bulk of the images are from China, there is an interactive map that shows where and when he photographed. The images are available in a medium size that is appropriate for PowerPoint and a larger size that could be used to make details for teaching.

Marinetti’s Papers

Monday, July 19th, 2010

The Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Yale University has several hundred images online from the Filippo Tommaso Marinetti Papers. Marinetti was one of the leaders of Futurism. The collection includes many historical photographs (notes on back scanned as well), some writings, and printed materials. It is possible to download at least two different sizes of each image by clicking through to the image size needed and then right clicking (control-click on a Mac) to save the image locally. The largest images are actually a bit bigger than what is needed for PowerPoint; the medium images will work for PowerPoint as long as they are not stretched to the point of pixelating.

Daumier Lithographs

Friday, May 21st, 2010

Robert Macaire architecte

Robert Macaire architecte; Paris, 1837

Brandeis University has posted nearly 4,000 digital images from their collection of lithographs created by Honoré Daumier. The collection can be searched by either basic or advanced methods, or it can be browsed by title, subject, or date. The images provided are 800 pixels on the long side, so they will work fine for PowerPoint; just don’t try to stretch horizontal images to fill a slide or they will pixelate.

Sistine Chapel QTVR

Wednesday, April 28th, 2010

If you want to get a better sense of how the architecture and art of the Sistine Chapel are integrated, check out this QTVR. I learned about it on the VRA listserv. You can use the mouse to rotate the image in any direction, and the plus and minus buttons in the lower left allow you to zoom in and out.  Music accompanies the site.

Art Finder

Friday, February 19th, 2010

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts and the Walker Art Center have collaborated on a website, called Art Finder, which allows access to images of thousands of items in their collections. You can search and/or use drop-down lists to narrow results. An Art Finder Video Tour is also available. In order to get access to PowerPoint-sized images, you must click on a thumbnail image then click on the link at the right that says “Printable Image”. This will open a larger image in a new window. Right-click (Windows) or ctrl-click (Mac) to save the image to a location of your choosing. Note that approximately 4,500 image from the Minneapolis Institute of Arts are in ARTstor, but Art Finder contains more than 20,000 images.

Wellcome Images

Thursday, January 7th, 2010

The Wellcome Trust is an independent charity, based in London, which funds research to improve human and animal health. The trust has an extensive library that includes an eclectic mix of photographs, paintings, prints, and drawings, many of which are now available online through Wellcome Images. Visitors to the site can browse by subject categories or search. The images are not large, but they would work fine for PowerPoint.

Historic Maps

Thursday, January 7th, 2010

Happy New Year! Today I learned about an Israeli website that provides a wealth of historic map images. Historic Cities has maps of major cities from around Europe, the Middle East, and parts of Africa. Most of the map images are available in low resolution (about right for PowerPoint) and high resolution (some are nearly 3000 pixels on the long side). For some of the cities, links to maps on other sites have also been provided.