2009 Teaching and Learning Symposium

2:30-4:30 p.m., April 21, 2009
HUB Ballroom


Session Description

 

 

A Descriptive Study of Under-represented Minority Students' Academic Adjustment to and Sense of Belonging in the University of Washington School of Nursing

Betty J. Gallucci & Sindy Jo (School of Nursing, Department of Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems)

Although baccalaureate student attrition at the University of Washington School of Nursing (UW SON) is 3-5% overall, minority student attrition rates are double that of Caucasian students. Most of the attrition occurs during the first quarter due to academic reasons. Academic success and retention is associated with positive adjustment to new academic environments and sense of belonging to an institution. The purpose of this study was to compare under-represented minority (URM) students' adjustment to the academic environment and sense of belonging within the UW SON to non-URM students.

Method: An investigator-designed Student Transition Survey was distributed to 96 first-year baccalaureate students in the UW SON, with a response rate of 67% (n=64). Independent T-tests were used to analyze whether significant differences existed between the URM and non-URM students' adjustment to the academic environment and sense of belonging. URM were defined as African-American, Hispanic, American Indian, Native Hawaiian, Laotian, Cambodian, and Vietnamese.

Results: The means of URM students' self-rated academic success, communication skills, adjustment to the UW SON, comfort level in approaching faculty, students, sense of belonging, and the importance of sense of belonging to their academic success were slightly lower than non-URM students. URM students self-rated time management ability was significantly less (t-test, p = 0.035) than non-URM students, and the only significant finding of this study. The means of URM students' self-rated ability to utilize resources, comfort level in approaching teaching assistants and academic advisors were slightly higher than non-URM students. URM students and non-URM students were equally comfortable approaching people of a different race or ethnicity in the UW SON.

Conclusion: URM students currently enrolled in the UW SON have significantly lower self-rated ability to manage their time than non-URM students. Assisting URM students with time management may promote their retention in the UW SON.

 

 


Index of Symposium Presenters