The King's Speech

The King's Speech

The UW Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences and the National Stuttering Association, with the support of several sponsors, hosted a screening of the movie "The King's Speech" on the day of its DVD release. The purpose of the event was to raise awareness of stuttering, inform the public about current research in stuttering, and to enjoy a film that many have said is one of the most accurate movie portrayals of a person who stutters. The screening was followed by a talk by Dr. Ludo Max about current stuttering research. A panel consisting of Dr. Max, speech language pathologists and two individuals who stutter also answered questions from the audience. Nearly 200 people attended the event.

Dr. Max’s presentation ”Seven decades of stuttering research since Bertie and Lionel: what do we know in 2011?” compared what is known about stuttering now to what was known about stuttering in the time of King George VI. Around the time that Lionel Logue served as King George VI's speech therapist, the earliest scientific research on stuttering was just getting started. Although many essential questions about stuttering still remain unanswered, remarkable progress has been made in understanding the underlying mechanisms and contributing factors. Dr. Max provided a general overview of the types of research that have been conducted and the most important facts that have been discovered. He also clarified the results of recent high profile genetic and neurological studies of stuttering.