Intergroup Dialogue, Education and Action (IDEA) Center
 
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Programs & Courses
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IDEA Courses

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

SocWf215: INTERGROUP DIALOGUE

SocWf404: CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND JUSTICE

SocWf442: BUILDING COMPETENCIES FOR INTERGROUP DIALOGUE FACILITATION

SocWf443: INTERGROUP DIALOGUE FACILITATION

SocWf495/CHID 474: EARLY FALL 2007 EXPLORATION SEMINAR IN CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

GRADUATE COURSES

SW504: SOCIAL WORK FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE:DEVELOPING A PERSONAL-PROFESSIONAL STANCE

SW534: PRAXIS OF INTERGROUP DIALOGUE


SocWf215: INTERGROUP DIALOGUE

This course is built on intellectual and experiential engagement with issues of difference, diversity, social justice, and alliance building. Through dialogic communication, students will explore issues of social identities, differences and inequalities with an aim to build greater understanding, skills and values for living, learning and working in a multicultural society. Students will develop an understanding of human life and conditions in the greater social context of diversity, inequalities and social change. Students will develop skills to foster relationship building among group members, and awareness of social diversity and inequalities. Students will also extend their knowledge to action by learning how to act against intolerance, promote diversity and greater equality. Add Code is required to register. Click here to complete form to get Add Code.


SocWf404:
CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND JUSTICE

The purpose of this course is to explore human diversity and the nature of social justice. It will provide the conceptual, theoretical, and empirical knowledge base related to disadvantage, oppression, and empowerment. This foundation knowledge is necessary in generalist social work practice in a multicultural society.

The course content deals with sociopolitical patterns of power and privilege, and examines one’s accessibility to structures of socioeconomic opportunities so as to understand the marginalization, invisibility, and devaluation of some individuals based on their social group memberships (such as race, class, gender, sexuality, religion, language, and ability status). Understanding how social power differentially shapes individuals’ development builds a framework for validating diversity. The analysis of social power is crucial for social work practitioners as it permeates every level of interaction with clients and clients systems. Thus, the following are fundamental steps in developing a multicultural social work practice:

  • Clarifying key concepts and issues on cultural diversity and justice.
  • Describing and explaining the interplay of culture and societal power.
  • Articulating ideals and principles of justice.
  • Engaging in personal and social transformation.

As these concepts, principles, and actions cannot be demonstrated in a self-enclosed system, they must be addressed in everyday life. Consequently, this course provides a forum in which you can:

  • critically examine your own social position as it is set in age, ability status, class, ethnicity, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, and national origin.
  • reflect upon ways in which these cultural assumptions, beliefs, and value systems will enhance or hinder your practice with people of diverse backgrounds.
  • develop and nurture approaches and perspectives to practicing social work with and across differences.

SocWf442:
BUILDING COMPETENCIES FOR INTERGROUP DIALOGUE FACILITATION

This is the first course in a two-quarter sequence providing BASW students with foundation knowledge and skills for working with diverse teams and small groups in educational settings. The course builds on SocWf404: Cultural Diversity and Justice which provided students with conceptual, theoretical, and empirical knowledge base related to difference, dominance, social justice, and empowerment. This course aims to extend the student’s knowledge about intergroup relations and conflicts, and prepare them to be active change agents as facilitators of intergroup dialogues. We hope that at the end of the Winter Quarter, students will be prepared to facilitate small diverse groups. Students facilitating intergroup dialogues in Spring 2003 will also enroll in the 2nd quarter course, SocWf443: Intergroup Dialogue Facilitation.

In Winter Quarter (SocWf442) the course will focus on both knowledge and skills development. Topics to be covered in the course will include: philosophy and principles of dialogic education and dialogic communication; intergroup communication; social identity development; principles of working with conflict; group dynamics, observation and facilitation; team building among co-facilitators; and creating a support system among instructors and facilitators.

In Spring Quarter (SocWf443) the course will be designed as a practicum seminar as a way of instruction, consultation and supervision. The knowledge and skills development from Winter Quarter will be examined in light of students’ actual experiences facilitating the intergroup dialogues. Class sessions will focus on comparison of facilitation experiences and consultations, trouble-shooting with other facilitators, co-facilitator team building, and planning for dialogues. We will also further explore specific intergroup issues that are current (such as, interracial relationships, affirmative action and immigration) in preparation for dialogues on these issues.


SocWf443: INTERGROUP DIALOGUE FACILITATION

This is the second course in a two-quarter sequence providing BASW students with foundation knowledge and skills for working with diverse teams and small groups in educational settings. The course is linked to the SocWf404: Cultural Diversity and Justice which provides students with conceptual, theoretical, and empirical knowledge base related to difference, dominance, social justice, and empowerment. Students in the SocWf443 course will serve as facilitators for the intergroup dialogues.

This course is designed to be a practicum seminar as a way of instruction, consultation and supervision of intergroup dialogue facilitators. This course builds directly upon the knowledge and skills developed in the Winter 2004 course, Socwf442: Building Competencies In Intergroup Dialogue Facilitation. These aspects will be examined in light of students’ actual experiences facilitating the intergroup dialogues. Class sessions will focus on comparison of facilitation experiences and consultations, trouble-shooting with other facilitators, co-facilitator team building, and planning for dialogues. We will also further explore specific and current intergroup issues (such as, interracial relationships) and prepare for dialogue sessions on these issues. We will also continue team building among facilitators and instructors.


SocWf495/CHID 474: EARLY FALL 2007 EXPLORATION SEMINAR IN CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

EARLY FALL 2007 EXPLORATION SEMINAR,
Cape Town, South Africa

A Decade Later: Truth, Reconciliation and Peace-building in the New South Africa

South Africa holds in its memory the deep history and cleavages of apartheid while at the same time embodying the most transformative possibilities of social change. The political revolution leading to the disbanding of apartheid now calls for a social revolution.

The Truth & Reconciliation Commission became the focal point for such a process, and is today recognized as one of the most remarkable national-level efforts at peace building. Students on this program will grapple with the question: How, and for whom, do truth, reconciliation, forgiveness and justice come together in peace-building? Through readings, guest presentations, outings and community engagement, students will learn about the origins of the Truth & Reconciliation Commission, other peace-building efforts, and their impact on the politics and people of the new South Africa a decade later. We will use experiences of bridge building and reconciliation in South Africa as a lens to interracial and intergroup relations in the United States, and vice versa.

Through readings, guest presentations, outings and community engagement, students will learn about the origins of the Truth & Reconciliation Commission, and its impact on the politics and people of the new South Africa a decade later. Key guest speakers will include South Africans centrally involved in peace building efforts (Staff of the Desmond Tutu Peace Center and the Institute of Justice & Reconciliation, Truth & Reconciliation Commissioners, community organizers working with the Institute for Democracy in South Africa and the Amy Biehl Foundation, faculty from the Universities of Western Cape and Cape Town, among others). Dialogue, critical self-reflection and community engagement will be key elements in the learning process as a way of bridging students’ own lived experiences in the USA (and elsewhere) to the social realities of South Africa. We will use experiences of bridge building and reconciliation in South Africa as a lens to interracial and intergroup relations in the United States, and vice versa.
Course Credit

Participants will receive 5 credits in Social Welfare (SocWf) 495 “Special Topics in Generalist Social Welfare” OR Comparative History of Ideas (CHID) 473 “Africa Study Abroad.” Participants should check with their academic advisors to determine how these credits may apply to major requirements.  Please go to http://depts.washington.edu/explore/programs/2007/capetown.htm to apply for the program.

 


SW504: SOCIAL WORK FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE--
DEVELOPING A PERSONAL-PROFESSIONAL STANCE

SW 504 focuses on personal and professional development toward social work practice for social justice. This course complements the “Intellectual and Historical Foundations of Social Work Practice” by locating the self in a professional and political context. The course employs critically self-reflective, experiential and dialogic learning processes to engage students to explore personal meaning systems and narratives in the context of professional values of social justice, multiculturalism, human behavior theory, empowerment and globalization. Such exploration through intensive involvement is geared to helping students develop a strong foundation for critical self-reflection and respectful engagement across differences in perspectives, experiences and histories.

The purpose of this course is to enable students to articulate a personal-professional stance toward social work practice for social justice. The course will provide the theoretical and experiential human behavior and social environment knowledge base related to difference, dominance (oppression and privilege), social justice, and liberation. The course will provide a dialogic forum for students to: (a) critically examine their social identities and positionalities embedded in race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, class, ability status, religion and national origin; (b) reflect on how socio-cultural beliefs, assumptions and value systems affect their social work practice; and (c) develop perspectives and approaches to working with and across social identities and positionalities. This course aims to help students develop the competencies of critical self-reflection, multicultural values and ethics, knowledge, awareness and skills in a variety of ways they can act against manifestations of social injustices and promote greater diversity and justice.


SW534: PRAXIS OF INTERGROUP DIALOGUE

This course is a core practice methods course 2 nd year MSW students to foster multicultural competencies—knowledge, awareness, values and skills--for working with diverse teams and small groups in multicultural settings with a focus on intergroup dialogue (IGD). IGD is an emerging social work practice method that focuses on dialogic engagement with client systems at multiple levels. IGD involves fostering egalitarian communication processes to build alliances for engendering and promoting greater social justice. IGD draws from principles in emancipatory education and empowerment practice, dialogic communication, intergroup relations and small group work. We envision such practice as fundamental to the principles of social justice, multiculturalism, empowerment and social change.

The course will emphasize knowledge and skills development by involving all course members in in vivo dialogues both in small and large groups. We will use an expanded notion of intergroup dialogue. While intergroup dialogue has been formally defined as a dialogue between two or more social identity groups that have a history or potential of conflict, this course will conceive of intergroup dialogue as any means designed to engage people from different personal, social and professional locations and positionalities for collective understanding, relationship building and affecting change for greater social justice. Our aim is that the course experience will foster a creative imagination for using the principles and skills of intergroup dialogue in different social work settings.

Students in this course will be expected to be actively involved in a praxis approach to learning—combining action and reflection, and theorizing through an intergroup dialogue lens. Students will be involved in application projects in class—through practice dialogue participation and facilitation-- and out of class--through an undergraduate intergroup dialogue initiative at the University of Washington and/or their social work internships. The goal of active application is to deepen the understanding of intergroup dialogue, consider the potentials for cross-context transferability, and collectively theorize about the practice-context intersection!