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Daryl A. Monear, MA, PhD

 

Administrator, Translational Center for Metabolic Imaging
dmonear@u.washington.edu
(ph) 206-221-6897 (fax) 206-221-6515
University of Washington
Box 357115
Seattle, WA 98195-7115

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As the administrator of the Translational Center for Metabolic Imaging, Dr. Monear manages the MR Spectroscopy facility, designs and maintains Center web sites, directs research grant development, and oversees all federal grant activity.

RESEARCH INTERESTS

In addition to his role in the organization, he has an M.A. in philosophy from the University of Massachusetts and a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies from the University of Washington with an emphasis on higher education and public policy. He has worked as a consultant on several projects for the Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board.

His current research interests include higher education and public policy, with particular focus on state higher education governance structures, public funding of higher education, budgeting and resource allocation policies, accountability programs, PreK‐16 transitions, policies relating to access, choice, and persistence in postsecondary education, public policy analysis, the study of colleges and universities as organizations, and the history of American higher education.


Publications in Progress


He is currently preparing a book for publication by the Georgetown University Press, entitled Who’s Holding the Reins?: Policy Dynamics in State Higher Education Governance. This book investigates the policy dynamics underlying change and stability in state higher education governance, using a comparative, multiple‐case study of policy activity in five states ‐ Massachusetts, New Jersey, Florida, Wisconsin, and Washington ‐ over a four decade period from 1965 to 2005, and employing two leading policy process theories ‐ advocacy coalition theory and punctuated equilibrium theory ‐ as lenses through which the processes of policy formation in higher education governance are viewed and analyzed.

In addition to this book publication, he is preparing three journal articles. One is a condensation of the research and results of his dissertation project. Another is an in‐depth investigation of the various strategies employed by policy entrepreneurs in their efforts to exploit opportunities to spearhead fundamental change in state higher education governance structures. A third is an analysis of recent trends in higher education governance policies.