Category Archives: Classes

Debunking the Myth: Marketing Redefined

How would you define marketing? For many people, they’d simply describe it as “it’s about cost, cost and (you guessed it …) more cost”. While TMMBA Professor, Natalie Mizik, acknowledges that spending is a factor that must be considered in marketing, the focus of her teaching and research challenges students to approach marketing in a much more integrated way.

TMMBA students embark on Mizik’s Strategic Marketing Management course in their 3rd quarter of the Program. She teaches marketing as a practical science that combines elements of other fundamental business courses – finance, statistics and economics to name a few. Students quickly learn that developing quantifiable and strategic marketing decisions is imperative for the success of a business. Watch this video to learn more about how Mizik strives to redefine how people look at marketing:

 

About Natalie Mizik: Natalie Mizik, Associate Professor of Marketing, has been with the Foster School of Business for two years. Prior to Foster, Mizik taught at Columbia Graduate School of Business, MIT Sloan School of Management, and the Kenan-Flagler Business School at UNC. Her current research focuses on branding, marketing strategy, myopic management, and pharmaceutical marketing. Read more about Mizik and her road to academia here.

Mizik will kick-off her third year teaching in the TMMBA Program this Summer Quarter. In her short time with the TMMBA Program, Mizik has already received numerous teaching awards – TMMBA Faculty of the Quarter (Class 12 & 13) and TMMBA Faculty Excellence in Teaching Award (Class 12 & 13). A student favorite to say the least!

Xin Chào from Vietnam!

Mikaela Houck, Assistant Director

I’m currently writing this post from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam where 22 Class 13 students have just kicked off their 10-day International Study Tour experience. Jet lag didn’t hold anyone back as we hit the ground running and began to explore this great city and all it has to offer.

Our first day of the tour acted as a great way for everyone to get our bearings – we started the day with a city tour of Ho Chi Minh City and explored the Presidential Palace and some beautiful French colonial buildings including the Notre Dame cathedral and city post office.

For the afternoon, we ventured out to the Mekong Delta and meandered through a maze of waterways. We had a couple stops along the way where we enjoyed local fruits and tea, music, and encountered a python (yes – I said a python). And a few folks were even brave enough to snap a few pictures with it. I was not one of them!

We capped the day with a celebratory welcome dinner to mark the beginning of an exciting tour to come. From a dynamic group of company visits that includes industries as such banking, technology, automotive, logistics, tax and inward investment, and market research and media (Ford, Cisco and Citi Bank to name a few companies) to unforgettable cultural experiences and phenomenal Vietnamese cuisine – the next 10-day will surely be a whirlwind that will not disappoint.

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About the TMMBA International Study Tour:
The International Study Tour experience is an optional tour for TMMBA students that occurs in the second year of study and gives students an opportunity to immerse themselves in a different cultural and business context than the one in which we all typically operate day-to-day.  Students who partake in the tour have the opportunity to visit companies, tour manufacturing facilities, and meet business leaders and government officials. Click here to view blog posts from past Study Tour experiences.

Capping the TMMBA experience

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The goal of any MBA capstone is to measure students’ ability to synthesize and demonstrate their understanding of key business and managerial frameworks, concepts and insights taught through the MBA coursework.  The capstone experience varies from program- to- program.  In researching and talking with my MBA and EMBA colleagues from around the U.S. it seems that capstones fall into three main categories:  case competitions, integrated or consulting projects and business plan competitions.

Remember your TMMBA capstone course or competition?

The TMMBA capstone experience has included case competitions (2002-2007), technology commercialization course and competition (2008-2010) and most recently a Venture Capital Investment course and competition (2011-2012).  To varying degrees, each of these capstones met the goals of a capstone and we appreciate all our various stakeholders for making each one a success.

As you reflect on your experience what comes to mind? 

I’m looking to our TMMBA community for constructive input, suggestions and ideas to move this experience forward.  I’m a firm believer that none of us are as smart as all of us – and while there may not be a “silver bullet” for the capstone experience, I’m certain with your help we can get very close!

There is always room to improve, innovate and evolve.

In the next monthly alumni TMMBA email we’ll announce the date for an early January dinner meeting – we’ll catch up and talk capstone!

I hope you will consider helping.

 

Tracy

Tracy Gojdics is the Director of the TMMBA Program and an alumna from the Class of 2007. Outside of the office you might find Tracy out hiking, running, reading, or spending quality time with her family. Tracy can be contacted at tracylt@uw.edu or via phone at 206-616-2610.

TMMBA Week in the Life: David Ginsberg, Day 6

David Ginsberg, TMMBA Student, Class of 2014

Woke up this morning to a gorgeous blue sky, a very welcome change from the last few days.

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I slept a bit longer than I should have so I left a bit late, and sped over the bridge, through Seattle, and across the lake to the EEC, missing breakfast for only the 2nd time since the program began. I did manage to grab a bowl of yogurt and granola and get into class less than 10 minutes after it started, and I think the extra sleep was worth it because it will help me stay focused better throughout the day. Our first class this morning is Managerial Accounting, and unfortinatley we’re not going over the midterm today. We are, however, reviewing the two case studies that were due before class started this morning. We just went over the solution for the first case and I got it almost entirely right, even catching some of the ‘gotchas’ hidden in the case. This bodes well for our next exam, which will cover this material. Accounting has probably been the biggest surprise for me – I dreaded Financial Accounting last winter quarter and it ended up being my favorite class that highly quantitative quarter, and this time Managerial Accounting is a close second to the Leadership Development during our Leadership Immersion at the beginning of this quarter. Not that I’m going to suddenly shift direction and go into accounting, but I’ve ended up enjoying both subjects and have done reasonably well in them.

During our morning break I talked to a couple students from the Monday section who told me that our Operations & Supply Chain Management professor told their class this morning that up until now it’s been easy and we should expect it to become more difficult from today on and to take much more of our time. Awesome, because I’ve been looking for things to do with all that spare time I’m spending sleeping 5 hours per night!

Lunch was delicious…today I was a bad vegetarian and had the beef vegetable stir-fry. I don’t regret it (the cow might, but that’s a question for a philosophy class). For the afternoon section we had five visitors. Visitors come periodically, sometimes prospective students, sometimes former students. It’s rare to have so many at once but always nice have visitors, especially when they engage in the discussions. This group was from next year’s class, and I think the first half of class scared them off because none of them came back after break (this is probably just as well, because after break came the most difficult and technical lecture of the entire course). By mid-afternoon I needed another cup of coffee. Caffeine is your friend in a full-time graduate program designed for working professionals. I like to call it liquid sleep.

Do not be alarmed…
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It looks like the rest of the quarter will be pretty intense: the midterm for this class gets released Thursday, immediately after that’s due the final for our Strategic a Management of Technological Innovation is released, and once that’s done we have the finals for this class and Managerial Accounting. Winter break has never looked so good!

TMMBA Week in the Life: David Ginsberg, Day 3

David Ginsberg, TMMBA Student, Class of 2014

Today’s schedule makes the last 2 days look like a breeze. At work my calendar was filled with meetings for all but 30 minutes, including interviewing a new candidate for my team. Since this role will work closely with me I put some time and thought into devising a series of technical and behavioral questions to ascertain how the candidate might handle various likely scenarios and if there was a good cultural fit. I sent my analysis to my boss who said it was great feedback, very intuitive and in line with his own thoughts so I’m glad I’m able to add value to that process. I also had lunch with a former coworker who’s interested in Tableau. We went out for sushi & we had a chance to catch up, share experiences at our new companies and talk a bit about how he might fit in at Tableau. The buzz around my new employer is kind of blowing me away, I mean I knew I’d found a gem and made the right choice for me, but I have a fellow TMMBA classmate and former study group member who’s early in the process of interviewing for a role with us, another expressed interest tonight when I got to class and several others have also expressed interest. As I’ve become accustomed to at Tableau the day flew by and before I knew it I was on my way across the lake to the EEC.

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Arrived at the EEC and tonight we had a Tech at the Top guest speaker from Concur speaking on Fostering Innovation, so I grabbed a plate of Mexican food and headed into classroom 3 for the talk. Class started a little late tonight at 6:15 due to the guest speaker during dinner, and tonight we had a record 3 guests from Monday section join us (we’ve had Monday students join us for the last 4 weeks straight, but only one per night until tonight). Some of my classmates suggested they’re sending spies but I suspect word is just getting out that the Wednesday section is more fun. (As you can see we have a healthy friendly rivalry between the sections…in truth the whole cohort is made up of wonderful, smart, committed people and I like every one of them).

Tonight at the start of class we broke into 6 groups and were assigned positions to defend on the group case we’d turned in before class started tonight. My group was assigned the opposite position from the one my study group chose and wrote our paper on last night, so I had a chance to argue for the other position. Here’s a picture I took of us after we wrapped up our arguments in favor:

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I’m actually live-blogging (hear that CNN?) during class tonight, multi-tasking as we used to say in the 90s before everyone realized it was impossible due to the singular nature of attention. I better turn my attention back to the content of class…more in a bit.

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Tonight I took advantage of our break to reach out to a hiring manager about my classmate’s interest & got that ball rolling. I also noticed they also put up lights at the EEC:

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Class will end at 9:30 tonight, but I’m going to say goodnight now.

Autumn quarter is just around the corner!

Mikaela Houck, Manager of Academic & Student Services

Halfway there. Over the hump. The end is in sight. The fact holds true no matter how you state it – TMMBA Class 13 is at the halfway point of their program experience. Bright eyed and bushy tailed, the group began their journey at the kick-off Program Immersion in December 2012. Nine months later, they are now enjoying a couple short (and well deserved!) weeks off from class this September. This time away from class allows the group to refresh before doing a deep dive into the second half of the schedule.

Let’s take a look at the courses in store for Autumn Quarter:

Strategic Management of Technology Innovation

Innovation is the single most important activity of an ongoing business. All progress occurs through innovation. (Peter Drucker)

Warren BoekerHow do you generate ideas and then develop these ideas into commercial products? The purpose of TMMBA’s Strategic Management of Technology Innovation is for students to master these exact questions. This 2-credit course challenges students to better understand the dynamics of industries driven by technological innovation and develop frameworks for managing tech-intensive businesses.

About the instructor:
Warren Boeker has been at the Foster School of Business since 1998. Before coming to Foster, he taught strategic management and entrepreneurship at Columbia University in New York City and global strategy development at London Business School. Professor Boeker’s recent research has examined the dynamics of strategy formulation and execution in organizations at a corporate and business level. Fun fact – Professor Boeker is also a former chemical engineer!

Operations & Supply Chain Management

In the annals of innovation, new ideas are only part of the equation. Execution is just as important. (Steve  Jobs)

Process flow analysis? Inventory management models? Queuing Concepts? No problem. TMMBA students enhance their critical thinking and quantitative prowess to examine operational issues and develop a variety of
analyMoinzadehtical approaches to manage these processes. Students also learn the role of operations management and its interactions with other functional areas within organizations.

About the instructor:
A TMMBA student favorite, Kamran Moinzadeh has taught with the TMMBA Program since its inception in 2001. Professor Moinzadeh won the TMMBA Excellence in Teaching Award in 2013 and has received numerous TMMBA Faculty of the Quarter awards. Professor Moinzadeh’s specialties include operations & supply chain management, inventory management, and quality management.

Managerial Accounting & Decision Making

Making good decisions is a crucial skill at every level. (Peter Drucker)

In the first quarter of TMMBA, students completed their Financial Reporting & Analysis course – which focused on accounting for decision makers external to the firm. This course does a reversal – information & decision making within anPatrick_edit organization.  Students will develop the tools needed to use information from the accounting system in managerial decisions and understand how the design of an accounting system influences behavior.

About the instructor:
Paige Patrick, Assistant Professor of Accounting, is teaching in the TMMBA program for the first time this fall.  Paige brings both academic and real world expertise to her classroom.  Her academic research interests include executive compensation, and prior to obtaining her PhD, she spent several years in the Enterprise Risk Services division of Deloitte & Touche.

 

In addition to these Autumn Quarter classes, TMMBA students will embark on a 3 1/2 day Leadership Immersion, which takes place this weekend at UW Paccar Hall. Stay tuned for a recap next week!

Summer Quarter Course Preview

Mikaela Houck, Manager of Academic & Student Services

With TMMBA Class 13 already one third of the way done with their 18-month program experience, the students are currently enjoying a short “break” between quarters. However, no rest for the weary, as they like to say. Even with some time off, the TMMBA Class 13 group has already kicked off preparations for their upcoming summer quarter classes.

Below is a sneak peek of what’s to come for the group:

Strategic Marketing Management

Strategic Marketing Management is the first of two marketing courses woven into the TMMBA curriculum. A blend of market analysis, strategy and implementation, this course is designed for students to explore the theory and applications of marketing concepts. Students will dive into the 5Cs and 4Ps and develop the skills needed to design a marketing strategy and its implementation plan.

About the Instructor: Natalie Mizik, Associate Professor of Marketing, is in her second year with the Foster School and TMMBA Program. In her short time with the program thus far, she’s already made her mark by receiving “Faculty of the Year” honors from the recent graduating class. Natalie’s specialties include branding, marketing strategy, myopic management, and pharmaceutical marketing. Read more about Natalie and her road to academia here.

Decision Modeling

Let’s do some quantitative analysis! This course teaches students to build and evaluate models and to understand the reasoning behind model-based analysis. Students delve into spreadsheet packages and master features that allow managers to perform sophisticated quantitative analysis in the comfortable and intuitive environment of the spreadsheet.

About the Instructor: A veteran to the Foster School and TMMBA, Mark Hillier, Associate Professor of Quantitative Methods, is about to embark on his 10th year of teaching with the TMMBA Program. Mark’s focuses include quantitative methods, operations management, and inventory control.  TMMBA students gain first-hand knowledge of Mark’s extensive research – he uses his own textbook “Introduction to Management Science: A Modeling and Case Studies Approach with Spreadsheets” in the classroom.

Domestic and International Economic Conditions

GDP, inflation, fiscal policies … oh my! Students are challenged to analyze global macroeconomic fluctuations on business and the challenges of macroeconomic policy-making in an interdependent world. Students come away with the tools to understand the key elements of economic growth, inflation, unemployment, business cycles, fiscal policy and monetary policy.  The global aspects are highlighted with consideration of national business systems, trade policy, the political economy of trade, and regional economic integration.

About the Instructor: Debra Glassman, Senior Lecturer in Business Economics, specializes in international finance, global macroeconomics, international trade policy and institutions, and European business. Debra has received past accolades as TMMBA Faculty of the Quarter and is currently researching home bias in international portfolio investment &  the World Trade Organization and international trade disputes.

Professional Communications: Persuasion

People become leaders because of their ability to persuade others to follow them.  In business, the art of selling your ideas is critical for personal success and for achieving the mission of any enterprise. Students will explore the elements of successfully persuading people and must deliver an in-class persuasive presentation.

About the Instructor: TMMBA Instructor, Lorraine Howell, is also a founder of Media Skills Training. As an award-winning broadcast media veteran, Lorraine has leveraged her expertise and worked with numerous TMMBA cohorts to hone students’ public speaking & presentation skills.

 

These courses offer a glimpse into the complete course offerings of the TMMBA Program. For a full list of the TMMBA curriculum, click here.

The TMMBA experience: A Q&A with current students and an alum

Sara Jones, Associate Director & 2012 alum

I recently hosted a live chat on Twitter with two current TMMBA students and an alum to talk about their experience going through the program. From why they chose the program to favorite classes and career impact, here’s a recap of what they had to say.

TMMBA Student Resources 101

Ally Wewers, TMMBA Program Coordinator

Today, TMMBA Class 13 students (who began at the beginning of January) have their first Saturday of class at Paccar Hall. TMMBA typically hosts one class per quarter on the Seattle Campus, which gives students an opportunity to see the other Foster Facilities and experience the campus environment. All morning, I’ve been listening to students ooh and ahh over Paccar Hall. “It’s like I’m back in my undergraduate days…” is a common comment from most.

Being on campus gives students a hands-on look at many other resources that TMMBA and the Foster School of Business provides for them.  Oftentimes, the 18 months of a TMMBA student go by so quickly that they forget to take a look around them and see what else is available outside of their classes.  I encourage all students to take advantage of these many benefits and resources:

  • Lounge for Foster MBA Students at Paccar
    Lounge for Foster MBA Students at Paccar

    Foster MBA Lounge and Access at Paccar Hall: With an activated Husky Card, students are able to access Paccar Hall, Dempsey Hall, and the MBA Lounge. Even when the Paccar Building is not open to the public, students are welcome to use the space for studying and group meetings. There’s even a dedicated space just for MBA students- the T-Mobile MBA Commons. This was a popular tour stop for our students today, and no- it does not come equipped with cigars and smoking jackets. It’s a study lounge- not to be confused with students other after-class haunts.

  • IMA (Intramurals Activity Building) – I was happy to hear today that a few students have already been working up a sweat at the IMA (only prompted in small part to the TMMBA ice cream cooler I’m sure). With a Husky Card, TMMBA students are allowed access to their fitness center and courts. UW Recreational Sports programs also provides the WAC (Waterfront Activities Center) where there are discounts available on canoe and rowboat rentals.

Husky Stadium

  • While we’re on the topic of fitness and sports, TMMBA students are always eligible for student tickets to Husky Athletic Events.  Some sporting events (baseball, volleyball, soccer) are free with a husky card, while others (men’s basketball, football) are subject to additional, discounted costs. Student tickets go fast for these events, so make sure to plan ahead for season or single-game tickets.
  •  UPass: Every UW student has a UPass which comes with their Husky Card. The U-PASS provides students with a variety of low-cost transportation options—from buses, commuter train service and light rail, to vanpooling and discounted carpooling. No activation required- once you get your Husky Card you’re ready to ride.
  • Foster Centers and Events:  The various Centers, including the Business and Economic Development Center, the Center for Leadership and Strategic Thinking, The Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship, and the Global Business Center- all welcome involvement from TMMBA students. Foster also hosts events, like the Leaders to Legends Breakfast Series and Meet-the-Firms. For an updated list of events, take a look at the Foster Calendar.
  • Finally, one of the advantages of being a student at the University of Washington is the world-class library system available for use. Today, a representative from the Foster Business School library came to speak to students about the amenities at their location in Paccar Hall. Available to students are recent business publications, database access, librarian assistance and much more. Whether it’s the Foster Library or one of the many other University Libraries, these student resources are not to be forgotten.

Husky Card

As you can see- many of these resources require a student to have their Husky Card. Getting a Husky Card is free to students, and only requires a visit to the Husky Card Offices. Other Husky Card benefits include discounts from a variety of merchants, free admission to UW Museums, access to UW Zip Cars, and many more.

In writing this, I know that there are still many other UW/Foster/TMMBA resources that I am not mentioning. From business cards to MBA clubs, to TMMBA Career Services and sponsorship affiliations, there’s always more to get out of the TMMBA experience. Hopefully, sometime between classes and homework and team meetings, our students will find time to take advantage of them all! Because TMMBA students always need one more thing to add to the to-do list…

The predicted end of the world has passed, now what?

Alden Erickson, TMMBA Student, Class 13

According to the Mayan calendar, the world was to have ended two days ago. As we are still here, it is fairly safe to say that their theory was incorrect. This is the latest in a series of reminders for me that our paradigms can be wrong. It took 5,125 years to disprove the Mesoamerican Long Count calendar. Fortunately, feedback in business is more rapid but still we can subscribe to theories for years without knowing if a better way exists. There are of course many ways to challenge one’s paradigms but I would suggest replacing them with new ones through TMMBA.

When I arrived home from immersion week, I was dog tired. My exhaustion was due in part to the intense schedule and late nights reading, but there was more. Over the week I had been exposed to a number of new ideas and my mind was swimming with the possibilities of how to integrate them into my work and life. I thought of the Team Performance Model and how to utilize the concepts of the Intangible Resource Base, Value-Related Processes, and Team Performance Context. I considered viewing my future negotiations through the lenses of Interests, Power, and Relationships. I pondered ethics and Edward Freeman’s Stakeholder Theory for Organizational Management. Yes, I was tired, but I was also happy as I stumbled through the door after a busy immersion week.

I have not fully absorbed these ideas yet. If anything, I have more questions now than when I started. In the next 18 months of the TMMBA program, I expect that countless more theories will be introduced and I welcome every one of them. It will take time to form new paradigms. However, as the end of the world does not appear to be imminent, my fellow classmates and I have time!