December, 2010

CISB International Business Career Panel

Wednesday, December 15th, 2010

CISB

On October 28, the CISB program invited five distinguished professionals from the international business community to speak about working globally and to give advice on how to make an internationally oriented career.

Melissa Peabody, a graduate of the Foster School and CISB, spoke about her time at Bryant Christie Inc. and how starting at a smaller firm gave her the confidence and the network to go after larger challenges when she moved to Starbucks in June of 2006. She said that in order to work internationally, one must be flexible: there will be conference calls at odd hours and there will be times where clear communication is key.

Pedro Piedra described his motivation for pursuing an international career starting when working next to the foreign exchange desk at one of his first jobs.  He saw the huge amount of activity and extremely active nature of the foreign exchange department and decided that is where he needed to be. Years later, Pedro has worked for many international firms in New York, Tokyo, and London.  Currently he works as the Vice President of International Foreign Exchange at Key Bank.

June Chino grew up in both the United States and Japan and so working internationally felt like the obvious choice for her.  This made her pursue a job at the Washington State Japan Office, a perfect fit for someone with familiarity of both Seattle and Japan.  As the sole representative of the public sector at the career panel, June said focusing more on the people and what you are doing, rather than the salary makes jobs in government extremely rewarding.

Steven Grimmer is the Vice President of Account Management at Expeditors International of Washington.  Steven talked a lot about the importance of networking and making a name for yourself in the community where you want to seek a career. He said that, when interviewing job candidates, the one thing that puts people over the top in his book is writing a personalized, hand written card after the interview to follow up and thank the potential employer for the opportunity. He said the personal touch can sometimes make all the difference.

Last, but certainly not least, Jess Estrada, a fellow UW graduate, talked about her career in marketing and the importance of social networking.  She said that if an employer can look you up on Google and find a blog you’ve written, or even just posts on Twitter about things that interest you and get a feel for what you are all about, it adds a whole other dimension to your application.  In 2008, Jess started a blog about local events, business, fashion, music, and other things that interest her. 

All of the panelists acknowledged the importance of getting involved and networking when pursuing a career in international business.  It never hurts to at least introduce yourself.

 

–Brian James, Senior, Finance and CISB (Custom Russian Track)

BUILDing Leaders

Monday, December 13th, 2010
Students participate in a discussion group based on leadership topics

Students participate in a discussion group based on leadership topics.

The second annual BUILD Leadership Summit brought together business and pre-business students of varying experience for one day of workshops and networking. While many at UW took the day off, Foster freshman through seniors participated in discussions, communication activities, a campus scavenger hunt and various workshops held during the Veteran’s Day holiday.  

The day-long event was part of the popular BUILD Program (Business Undergraduates in Leadership Development) and earned student participants two  BUILD credits– 1/4 of what is needed to earn a BUILD Certificate.  Students who earn 8 BUILD Program credits throughout the school year can earn a certificate and an invitation to a VIP reception at the end of the year. The BUILD Program hosts five events per quarter.

Alumni volunteers came back to help Undergraduate Programs Office advisers facilitate discussion groups and activities aimed at improving students’ leadership skills. Each student walked away with new contacts of peers and alumni, as well as a certificate of completion for participating in the day’s events.  

Mandy Baker helps guide her teammates through a communication exercise.

Mandy Baker helps guide her teammates through a communication exercise.

Dawg Daze Afternoon

Monday, December 13th, 2010

The 2010-2011 school year kicked off on Tuesday, September 28th, with the annual Dawg Daze Ice Cream Social. Foster Undergraduate Programs Office staff scooped ice cream and doled out a variety of toppings as the line stretched out the doors of the “campus entrance” on the second floor of the brand new Paccar Hall. Students, faculty and staff wandered around the new space as more than 450 people were served free ice cream sundaes during the one-hour event.

Dawg Daze, sponsored by UW First Year Programs, happens prior to the start of classes each Fall quarter and acts as the UW’s official welcome week.

The line winds outside of Paccar Hall