Interdisciplinary PhD Program in Urban Design & Planning

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Phase II Courses

The Area of Study

Once a student is admitted to Phase II, they form a Supervisory Committee to oversee their progress through the rest of their academic program. The committee must consist of at least three faculty members in the Interdisciplinary Group representing at least two academic departments; one member must be from the Urban Design and Planning Department. Students requiring a committee of a different composition should submit a request to the Steering Committee. The Steering Committee recommends (but does not require ) that students have at least four faculty members on their committee and that two of these be from the Urban Design and Planning Department. Students will develop with their supervisory committee a description of their proposed areas of study. These will define areas of scholarship that must demonstrate an interdisciplinary research approach to an application within urban and environmental planning and policy. The description should develop a curriculum proposal approved by the supervisory committee that addresses the following advanced study requirements.

Phase II Curriculum Requirements
Students are required to complete five courses that satisfy broad categories of urban theories and urban design & planning. Many approved courses for each requirement draw on courses outside the URBDP program. Based on their own research program and agenda, students may select courses that align closely within one research cluster or may choose courses across research clusters. These requirements provide opportunities to establish relationships with faculty with whom they may wish to work as dissertation advisor or supervisory committee members. In addition, to complete this phase of the program, students must complete two additional advanced research design and methods courses, as well as a teaching methods seminar (see below: currently under consideration).

Phase II requirements involve 7 (total) courses and a teaching seminar, in addition to advanced courses directly related to the area of study selected by the student. Some of these courses may be taken in the first year.

Urban Processes and Patterns
Students must complete at least three courses that satisfy the urban processes and patterns requirement. This requirement is designed to ensure a deeper understanding of the bio-physical and socio-economic forces that shape urban areas, and to draw on urban theories from multiple disciplines.

Choose three of the following, with potential for substitution of alternative courses (see below for possible substitute courses):

URBDP 479
Urban Form
URBDP 552
Real Estate Process
URBDP 561
Urban Economics
URBDP 598
Urban Ecology
URBDP 565
American Urban History
GEOG 440
Regional Analysis
GEOG 448
Geography of Transportation
GEOG 466
Regional Economic Development
GEOG 477
Advanced Urban Geography
GEOG 478
Intraurban Spatial Patterns/Social Justice & the City
GEOG 479
Race, Ethnicity, and the American City
GEOG 578
Research Seminar: Theorizing the City
SOC 490
The Urban Underclass
POL S 481
Big City Politics

Urban Processes and Patterns Substitutions
Approved

CEE 547
Lake Watershed Management
ECON 500
Microeconomic Analysis 1
ECON 501
Microeconomic Analysis 2
ECON 508
Microeconomic Analysis 3
GEOG 577
Research Seminar: Internal Spatial Structure of Cities
PB AF 597
Environmental Decision Analysis
PB AF 599J
Institutional Perspectives on Management
URBDP 498
Methods of Community Engagement
URBDP 554
Real Estate Finance
URBDP 560
Inequality, Governance & Policy in the Metropolitan Region
URBDP 576
Pedestrian Travel, Land Use, & Urban Form
URBDP 598
Topics in Urban Affairs: community and Economic Dev.
URBDP 598
Transportation & Environment
URBDP 553
Urban Land Economics
CEE 581
Travel Demand Forecasting
CFR 541
Advanced Landscape Ecology
PB AF 565
Topics in Urban Affairs

Not Approved
CEE 591
Freight Transportation
ESC/ESRM 441
Landscape Ecology (formerly approved, now an undergrad class)
URBDP 467
Remote Sensing
URBDP 474
Site Planning: Issues & Techniques
URBDP 500
Survey of Urban Planning


Urban and Environmental Design and Planning
Students must complete at least two courses that satisfy the urban and environmental design and planning requirement. This requirement is designed build a strong foundation in urban and environmental interventions, whether design, planning or policy oriented.

Choose two of the following, with potential for substitution of alternative courses (see below for possible substitute courses):

PBAF 513
Public Policy Analysis
PBAF 517
Microeconomics of Individual & Organizational Choice II
PBAF 518
Applied Cost-Benefit Analysis
URBDP 598
Transportation Planning
URBDP 598
Environmental Planning
URBDP 598
Land Use 2
POLS 574
Environmental Regulation Policy
CFR 592
Environmental Policy Processes
ARCH 561
Urban Design Theory
PBAF 564
Housing & Social Policy

Urban and Environmental Design and Planning Substitutions
Approved

CEE 482
Waste Water Reuse
CEE 589
Transit Systems Planning
ECON 536
Environmental Economics
ENVIR 585
Climate Impacts on the Pacific Northwest
ESRM 472
Wetland Ecology & Management
PB AF 544
Land Use and Transportation Policy
PPM 510
Public Policy Analysis
SMEA 519
Marine Policy Analysis
URBDP 562
Intro. to Neighborhood Planning and Community Development
URBDP 567
Democracy, Citizenship, and Participation in the City
URBDP 598F
Urban and Suburban Building Types for Urban Designers and Planners
URBDP 598G
Infrastructure Planning and Local Finance

NOT Approved
URBDP 450
Land use, Growth Management, and Environmental Planning


Advanced Research Design and Methods
All students must complete two additional courses that satisfy the advanced research design and methods requirement. The purpose of this requirement is to help students develop more focused and targeted research designs based on their own research interests, and to build their methodological capacity to implement this research. These courses may be either quantitative or qualitative in nature; however, they must be at an advanced graduate level.

Choose two of the following, with potential for substitution of alternative courses (see below for possible substitute courses):

CS&SS 560
Hierarchical Modeling for the Social Sciences
CS&SS 567
Statistical Analysis of Soial Networks
CS&SS 594
Multiway Data Analysis
CS&SS 594
Distributional Methods with Application to the Measurement of Inequality
CS&SS 529*
Sample Survey Techniques
CS&SS 544*
Event History Analysis for the Social Sciences
CS&SS 566*
Causal Modeling
URBDP 422
Urban & Regional Geospatial Analysis
URBDP 525
Evaluation in Urban Planning
GEOG 561
Urban Geographic Information Systems
PBAF 526
Program Evaluation
SOC 526
Causal Approach to Theory Building & Data Analysis
SOC 529
Structural Equation Models for the Social Sciences
COM 511
Content Analysis
COM 513
Fieldwork Research Methods
COM 527
Global Communication Research Methods
ANTH 551
Research Design

*For advanced students, with previous advanced statistical coursework and exposure to R.

Research Design and Methods Substitutions
Approved

CSSS 510
Maximum Likelihood Methods for Social Sciences
ENVH 593
Current Topics in Risk Assessment
EPI 511
Introduction to Epidemiology
EPI 538
Nutritional Epidemiology
GEOG 525
Advanced Qualitative Methods in Geography
GEOG 526
Advanced Quantitative Methods in Geography
QERM 514*
Analysis of Ecological Data 1
STAT 512
Statistical Inference
STAT 513
Statistical Inference
QSCI/STAT 480*
Sampling Theory for Biologists
CSSS 526
Structural Equation Models for the Social Sciences
CSSS 536
Log-Linear Modeling & the Analysis of Categorical Data
CSSS 564/STAT 564
Bayesian Statistics for the Social Sciences
CSSS 589
Multivariate Data Analysis for the Social Sciences
SEFS 502
Analytical Techniques for Community Ecology

*For advanced students, with previous advanced statistical coursework and exposure to R.

NOT Approved
URBDP 467
Remote Sensing
FISH 547
River ecology
OCEAN 452 / FISH 453
Spatial Information Technologies
OCEAN 506A
Applied Geostatistics


Teaching Methods
One teaching seminar, and experience as a TA for at least one quarter, before completion of phase III. The following course or a suitable alternative will satisfy this requirement.

[Note: this requirement is under consideration, due to the scarcity of teaching methods courses offered. Students are strongly encouraged to teach a class. One can apply to teach an URBDP summer quarter class; the application process takes place in autumn quarter. Please contact the Urban Design & Planning office for further information, 206-543- 4190.]

GRDSCH 630
Special Topics in College/University Teaching

To keep track of course requirements, you can use this spreadsheet.

General Examination
A critical review of the literature in the area of study must be developed by the student, which integrates interdisciplinary research on the area of study selected by the student, and identifies areas of potential research opportunity that may subsequently form the basis for a dissertation proposal. The review should demonstrate broad familiarity with relevant research in the chosen area, and with the range of theory and methods applied within the reviewed literature. The committee will provide feedback to the student at this stage about areas of additional study that may be required before a suitable dissertation proposal may be developed. Once advanced coursework in the area of study and critical review of the literature are completed, the student and committee schedules a General Examination, in which the Supervisory Committee evaluates the preparedness of the student to advance to doctoral candidate status, and to begin developing a dissertation proposal. It will be designed and evaluated by the student's supervisory committee.


Phase III: Dissertation

Once the student passes the General Examination, he/she is advanced to the level of doctoral candidate, and is expected to build on the critical review of the literature to develop a dissertation proposal. The dissertation proposal should demonstrate the characteristics of interdisciplinarity, relevance to urban and environmental planning and policy, and potential for contribution to scholarship.

Dissertation Proposal
A dissertation proposal should be formally presented to the Reading Committee at a scheduled defense presentation. The Reading Committee must certify that the student is prepared to undertake the proposed research, and that it meets the program requirements for scholarship.

Dissertation Defense
The final step in the Ph.D. program is the formal presentation and defense of the dissertation. This process follows the normal protocol as set by the Graduate School.