Current Research Projects

On-Time Autism Intervention (OTAI) Project
The On-Time Autism Intervention (OTAI) Project is a research-community partnership focused on engaging community partners, supporting community providers through collaboration and training, and is currently conducting pilot work in the community. Click here for more information.
Now Recruiting! The Infant Brain Imaging Study - Early Prediction

Now Recruiting! The Infant Brain Imaging Study - Early Prediction is enrolling infants ages 0-6 months who have an older sibling with Autism. The goal of the study is to determine whether brain imaging can help detect infants who are likely to go on to develop autism spectrum disorder. Infants complete developmental testing and MRI scans at 6, 12, and 24 months. This study seeks to replicate and expand on the findings of the previous IBIS study. To learn more, please contact our research coordinator at (206) 685-8404 or ibisstudy@uw.edu or see the press release here.

Now Re-Contacting IBIS-School Age Study Participants! The IBIS Sleep Study
Now Re-Contacting IBIS-School Age Study Participants! The IBIS Sleep Study will study sleep patterns in the original group of children who participated in the Infant Brain Imaging Study as they reach school age (7-11 years). The Sleep Study will involve home-based assessments of sleep and sleep habits. The association of sleep habits with behavioral and developmental characteristics and brain development will allow researchers to more fully understand sleep and development. This study is currently recruiting families who have previously participated in IBIS. To learn more, please contact our research coordinator at (206) 616-8839 or ibisstudy@uw.edu.
Now Re-Contacting IBIS Participants! The IBIS- School Age Study
Now Re-Contacting IBIS Participants! The IBIS- School Age Study will follow the original group of children who participated in the Infant Brain Imaging Study as they reach school age (7-11 years). The school-age follow-up will involve comprehensive assessments of behavioral, cognitive and psychiatric outcomes, as well as brain development through Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). This will allow, for the first time, researchers to look at developmental trajectories from infancy to school age in order to more fully understand brain-behavior relationships in children who do (and do not) have siblings with autism. This study is currently recruiting families who have previously participated in IBIS. To learn more, please contact our research coordinator at (206) 616-8839 or ibisstudy@uw.edu.
Now Recruiting! The Infant Down Syndrome Study
Now Recruiting! The Infant Down Syndrome Study. The goal of this study is to characterize early intellectual, communication, and behavioral development and, for the first time, brain development in young children with Down Syndrome from 6 months of age through 24 months. This study mirrors and expands on the IBIS study and will use the knowledge gained from infants with a family history of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to further our understanding of Down Syndrome. To learn more, please contact our research coordinator at (206) 685-8404 or ibisstudy@uw.edu.
Now Recruiting! Sleep Patterns in Children with ASD
Now Recruiting! Sleep Patterns in Children with ASD We are doing research to better understand sleep patterns in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). By improving our understanding of sleep problems in ASD new intervention approaches can be developed which may lead to improved behavior, health, emotion regulation, and attention. The purpose of this research study is to determine if the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) can be administered to children with ASD. The PVT is a widely used tool in sleep research, meant to measure attention after a night of sleep. The PVT is a 5-minute test where your child will be asked to press anywhere on the screen as soon as you see a red circle. We are seeking children ages 7-11 years with and without an ASD diagnosis to participate. If interested, please contact the research team: seebeckj@uw.edu or 206-291-7489