Summer Camp in Full Swing!

July 22nd, 2014 by Arboretum Education Supervisor, Patrick Mulligan

UW Botanic Gardens Summer Camps are in full swing at the Arboretum as we begin Week 4: “Tadpoles & Whirligigs”. Last week’s “Don’t Bug Out” camp was a big hit with our 6 – 12 year old audience, and to go along with the theme, we gave our 48 campers a survey about insects. Surprisingly, though most kids thought that if insects were human-sized, ants would most likely take over the world, “flying” was the more desired insect super power with “ant strength” barely registering. See below for all the results, and follow this link if you’d like to take the survey yourself! https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/M6P29LK

 

kids_Bug_Survey_Page_1 kids_Bug_Survey_Page_2

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Art Exhibit: Oil Paintings by Kathleen Wolfe opens August 5

July 22nd, 2014 by UWBG Communication Staff

Wolfe paintingSeattle Parks and the Northwest
Artist Kathleen Wolfe celebrates her love of nature with oil paintings on canvas featuring poppies, water lilies and landscape with majestic trees. Her paintings will be on display in the Miller Library from August 5th to September 16th.

Meet the artist at a free reception at the Elisabeth C. Miller Library on Wednesday, August 13th from 5:00 to 7:00pm. 3501 NE 41st Street, Seattle.

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July Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

July 12th, 2014 by UWBG Horticulturist
Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (July 7 - 20, 2014)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (July 7 – 20, 2014)

“Sporting Wood”

1)    White Ash    (Fraxinus americana)

  • Tough, plentiful, and easily bent into curves, Ash is used in tennis racquets, billiard cues, skis, and baseball bats.
  • White Ash is native to eastern and central North America.
  • This cutting is from the cultivar ‘Rose Hill’, located in grid 47-3E near the Lagoons.

2)   Common Box    (Buxus sempervirens)

  • Used for crocquet balls because of its hardness.
  • Native to Europe, northern Africa and western Asia.
  • The cultivar here is ‘Argentea’ from grid 5-B in our Boxwood Collection.

3)   American Hop Hornbeam    (Ostrya virginiana)

  • The first ice hockey sticks were made from the dense wood of this small tree in the mid-19th century until the 1930s by the Mi’kmaq people of Nova Scotia.
  • Ostrya virginiana is native to eastern North America.
  • The Arboretum has two trees in grids 19-3W and 24-4W.
Close-up photo of Persimmon flowers

Close-up photo of Persimmon flowers

4)   Persimmon    (Diospyros virginiana)

  • The “woods” of golf (drivers, not Tiger’s) were typically made from this American member of the ebony family from which it inherits its extreme density.
  • Persimmon is most common in the southeastern United States.
  • In the Arboretum, they are in grids 12-1W and 12-2W, north of the Boyer Street parking lot.

5)   Sugar Maple    (Acer saccharum)

  • Commonly called “rock” maple by those who value its hardness and smooth grain.
  • This native of eastern North America provides wood for bowling alleys, bowling pins, basketball courts, and baseball bats.
  • The Arboretum has several cultivars in various locations.

Sources:

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Meet our Summer Education Staff

July 2nd, 2014 by Sarah Heller, Community Programs Coordinator & Fiddleheads Forest School Director

Summer camps have exploded in growth this year and so has our staff to teach and lead Discussing the importance of earthworms and what they do.campers through the wonders of the Washington Park Arboretum and Center for Urban Horticulture (CUH). Camps are based at the Arboretum, and during some weeks we’ll take field trips to CUH and the Union Bay Natural Area. These Summer Garden Guides come from around the country and bring a diverse array of experiences to their teaching and play this summer in our environmental education day camps.

 

 

Hannah Earhart

HannahEHannah has a B.S. in Art Education from Penn State University and recently wrapped up her M.Ed. from The University of Washington. Through work as a preschool Montessori teacher, she intensified her love of questioning and meaning making and enjoys facilitating those experiences in others. When not teaching she enjoys finger painting and petting dogs.

 

 

 

Angela Feng

AngelaFMy name is Angela Feng, and I am going into my fourth year at the University of Washington. I am an Environmental Studies major and a Spanish minor, and hope to pursue a career in environmental education once I graduate. I have always been passionate about the environment, and I discovered how rewarding it can be to transfer that passion to others by getting people excited about nature. I try to spend as much time as I can outdoors, whether it’s working on my p-patch, traversing the myriad of parks around Seattle on my bike, or taking nature walks! I am also fond of musical instruments, fun facts, and bread (I really like bread).

 

Dave Gifford

DaveGOriginally from Pennsylvania, Dave has been teaching in garden and environmental education in the Pacific Northwest over the last six years. Last year he served as an instructor for school overnight and summer programs at Islandwood on Bainbridge Island. He most recently taught with Islandwood’s Seattle-based Homewaters program and SPU’s Salmon in the Schools program. Dave enjoys art-making, music, gardening, and anything outdoors.

 

 

 

Kelsey Hutchison

KelseyHKelsey grew up in the mountains of Colorado, where she grew up with a love of the outdoors. After graduating from the University of Kansas with a degree in environmental studies, she spent a few years working at outdoor environmental education centers throughout the U.S. It was this work that led her to Seattle, where she has worked with children as a nanny. She has also spent time traveling and volunteering abroad. Some of her other interests include: hiking, camping, gardening, dancing, music, travel, hula hooping and crafting.

 

 

Katherine Straus

KatherineSOriginally from Massachusetts, Katherine has spent time in Rhode Island, New York, and Lake Tahoe (on both the Nevada and California sides) before moving to Seattle two years ago to start her Masters in Education at the UW. It was her stint working as a naturalist and outdoor educator in Lake Tahoe where she first found her passion for outdoor education and she has been pursuing it ever since. She loves being in Washington where she gets to enjoy the best of both worlds: mountains AND ocean, and is looking forward to lots of camping, hiking and swimming this summer.

 

 

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A glimpse into the past – Joe Witt in the “pit house”

July 1st, 2014 by UWBG Communication Staff

By John A. Wott, Director Emeritus

photo

Joseph A. Witt inspecting seed flats and cuttings in the “pit houses” of the University of Washington Greenhouses at Washington Park Arboretum. April 1976,

This photograph taken in April 1976, shows Joseph A. Witt inspecting seed flats and cuttings in the “pit houses” of the University of Washington Greenhouses at Washington Park Arboretum. Joe, as he preferred to be called, was a prominent staff member of the Arboretum for more than 30 yrs. Officially the Curator, he was also appointed as a Professor of Urban Horticulture at the University of Washington’s Center for Urban Horticulture, when it officially opened in 1980.

Joe was a “people person” and was instrumental in assisting the Arboretum Foundation in starting many programs, including encouraging volunteers, “fun days” in weeding, and other educational events. As curator, he was in charge of bringing many new plants into the collection and for the leadership of the UW grounds crew. He was an expert on the horticultural and native flora of the Pacific Northwest. He was renowned and sought-after for his teaching of plant materials, both to UW students and to thousands of horticulturists who came to the Arboretum during his tenure. He also experimented with plant breeding and many of his unnamed rhododendron hybrids still “lurk” within the Arboretum collections. He named many plants and the famed Acer tegmentosum ‘Joe Witt’, a highly striped form of the Manchurian Stripebark Maple, is now  found in increasing numbers on Seattle streets.

His widow, Jean, still active in her mid-90’s, was a keen iris breeder and together they were well known and respected in the native and hardy plant societies of the world. I personally remember several memorable field study trips to the Cascades and east side of Washington in the early 1980’s, whereby Joe spoke about the plants and Jean spoke about the geology. As Joe approached retirement age, he was stricken with cancer and died in May 1984, a great loss to the Northwest horticultural community. However, his legacy lives on.

photo

Joe and Jean Witt, Arboretum Foundation Annual Dinner, June 1972


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July 2014 Plant Profile: Hydrangea integrifolia

July 1st, 2014 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes
Photo courtesy of Richie Steffen/Great Plant Picks

Photo courtesy of Richie Steffen/Great Plant Picks

An evergreen hydrangea?!!  You betcha!

There are very few evergreen vines for gardeners in the Pacific Northwest, but this gorgeous gem from Asia is  becoming more readily available and it’s simply one of the coolest flowers you’ll ever get to witness opening.

From plump, peony-like buds, they begin to slowly crack open, a froth of fertile flowers begin to form and over the course of a few days, a flat umbel “lacecap” begins to form. People will begin to believe that it’s actually a hydrangea!

Hydrangea integrifolia is quite slow to establish (and re-establish, as we’ve learned after moving it to its new location at CUH three years ago) and may not even flower for the first few years of its life. Once it does, it puts on quite a show each summer. Dark green, glossy foliage remains year round. It’s a clinging plant that forms aerial roots on its stems. The aerial roots attach to a rough surface such as the bark of a tree or rough stucco wall; they don’t form tendrils or long whip-like shoots that wrap around supports so you have to carefully train them until they take hold. You could also let it sprawl on the ground as a ground-cover plant in a woodland garden.

They grow best in a protected spot in the garden such as a shady north-facing wall (such as our specimen here at the Center for Urban Horticulture), but they’re also quite at home tumbling over a stone wall in full sun with regular irrigation during the summer months.

Common Name:  Evergreen Climbing Hydrangea
Location: Center for Urban Horticulture – Miller Library North Foundation Bed
Origin: Taiwan/Philippines
Height and Spread: Can get 40′ tall and about 20′ wide
Bloom Time: Late June – July

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June Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum (Part II)

June 29th, 2014 by UWBG Horticulturist
Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (June 23 - July 6, 2014)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (June 23 – July 6, 2014)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1)   Erhetia dicksonii

Close up photo of Ehretia dicksonii  inflorescence

Close up photo of Ehretia dicksonii inflorescence

  • Ornamental tree from Asia with corky bark and fragrant white terminal cymes.
  • Located along path heading up to Rhododendron Glen from Azalea Way, grid 15-1E.
  • Go to link below for thorough description and uses.
    http://www.arthurleej.com/p-o-m-July07.html

2)   Holodiscus discolor      (Ocean Spray)

  • My favorite summer flowering Pacific Northwest native deciduous shrub.
  • In full flowering, cascading glory now throughout our native matrix.

3)   Hypericum henryi ssp. uraloides

  • The really big Azalea Way flower show may be over, but now it’s Hypericum time.
  • This shrubby St. John’s wort is a huge attractant of many kinds of bees.
  • Located in east-side bed J, midway down Azalea Way, grid 20-1W.

4)   Illicium henryi      (Henry Anise Tree)

Close up photo of Toona sinensis leaves and inflorescence

Close up photo of Toona sinensis leaves and inflorescence

  • A handsome evergreen woodland shrub or small tree from China.
  • Waxy, bright rose-colored flowers. Leaves and star-shaped fruit give off a scent of anise when crushed.
  • Located along forested Ridge Trail within the Asiatic Maple section, grid 25-1E.

5)   Toona sinensis      (Chinese Cedar)

  • You can Toona piano, but you can’t Toona fish . . . or in this case, happyfacea tree.
  • Deciduous tree from eastern and southeastern Asia with pinnately compound leaves and white flowering panicles in summer.
  • Located in north Pinetum, grids 44 and 45-6W. For cultural, medicinal and commercial (timber) importance, go to link  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toona_sinensis.
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2014 Park in the Dark Dates

June 23rd, 2014 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Night time is special at the Arboretum – the people and cars are gone, and the nocturnal animals move about. Night hikes are a chance for us to explore our senses, search for crepuscular and nocturnal movements in the forest and learn about night-related animal adaptations. Programs are designed for families with children aged 5-12. Meet at the Graham Visitors Center and BYOF (Bring Your Own Flashlight!)
Hikes are always from 8-9:30pm on the Saturday nights listed below:

2014 Summer DatesNight Hike Image

  • June 28 (New Moon)
  • July 12 (Full Moon)
  • July 26 (New Moon)
  • August 9 (Full Moon)
  • August 23 (New Moon)

Cost is $8 per person
Register online or call 206-685-8033

Pre-registration is required. This allows our instructor to properly plan and prepare for each class so that you and your family can get the most out of it. Drop-ins are not accepted.

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iSchool Capstone: Improving the visitor experience with an app

June 20th, 2014 by UWBG Communication Staff

By Sarai Dominguez

photo

Information School graduate students, Anna Sgarlato, Sarai Dominguez and Loryn Lestz, presenting their Capstone poster 6/5/2014.

It has been a great pleasure to work in partnership with the University of Washington Botanic Gardens and Information School to design the future Arboretum mobile app. My team and I had a blast!

After four quarters of information science courses, we were all eager to practice our learning’s in a real-world scenario. Throughout our first meetings with UWBG staff, we learned about the exciting digitization projects at hand. However, we still realized the information need of Arboretum visitors who wanted map and plant information while wandering the park, and not just at home on a desktop computer. We started our project with a research phase (which allowed us to meet and interview volunteers and staff throughout the organization), sketched our ideas, built an interactive prototype and tested our design with Arboretum enthusiasts; it was a hit!

My favorite part of the project was meeting volunteers and staff and noticing how invested in the Arboretum this group is. They truly believe in the Arboretum as a place for retreat, exploration, learning and building valuable friendships. These principles were the inspiration for our mobile app design and we hope that current and future park visitors will experience this in the information tool we have placed in their hands.

Thank you, UWBG, for an incredible capstone experience!

Interactive map of the Arboretum (optimized for desktop computers)

Sketching out the app user experience.

Sketching out the app user experience.

A design comp of the app home screen

A design comp of the app home screen


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iSchool Capstone: Designing an app for Arboretum visitors

June 19th, 2014 by UWBG Communication Staff

By Loryn Lestz

photo

Information School graduate students, Anna Sgarlato, Sarai Dominguez and Loryn Lestz, presenting their Capstone poster 6/5/2014.

Working with the staff and volunteers of the University of Washington Botanic Gardens to design a mobile app for Arboretum visitors has been a wonderful way to bring my graduate school experience to a close. Everyone my team came in contact with during the design process was not only enthusiastic and supportive of our project but also eager to contribute ideas and provide feedback on the app itself. A number of the usability tests we conducted to confirm our design choices were done with volunteers and the passion they expressed for the Arboretum in my interactions with them was truly inspiring. It was truly encouraging to hear them talk about the ways in which they felt the app would be able to help them and the visitors they interact with to enjoy the Arboretum even more than they already do.

Perhaps the most rewarding part of this project for me as a designer was getting to negotiate a balance between enriching Arboretum visitors’ experience with new technologies and keeping that experience focused on the natural beauty of the Arboretum. As someone who loves coming to the Arboretum and forgetting that I am in the middle of the city for a few hours, I knew this was something we would need to be mindful of as we worked. My team and I were successful at keeping this among our top priorities throughout the design process, and couldn’t be happier with the resulting design. I am looking forward to seeing the app move into the development phase and can’t wait to see (and use!) the final product.

Interactive Map of the Arboretum (optimized for desktop computers)

Sketching out the app user experience.

Sketching out the app user experience.

A design comp of the app home screen

A design comp of the app home screen.


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