Chile Tour 2011: Hiking Through Herds of Guanacos

January 27th, 2011 by Sarah Reichard
Hiking in Torres del Paine by S. Reichard

Our group hikes through steppe vegetation in Torres del Paine

Last night we met with our guides to learn about the hikes possible for today. We had requested a long hike to the base of the Torres del Paine massif. It was clear they did not want to do this hike and warned us of the steepness, high winds, and danger. The other hike was all unicorns, rainbows, and puppies. Well, more like pictographs, guanacos, and fox cubs.

group photo by iceberg

Our hikers to the iceberg overlook

This morning Dan and a few brave hobbits started early for the long journey to Mordor. The rest of us slept in and had a lovely three hour hike through Andean steppe vegetation.

 

Manuela the naturalist photo by S. Reichard

Our naturalist guide, Manuela (with head scarf), helps us identify yet another Patagonian plant

Guanacos in Chile by S. Reichard

We saw herds of guanacos on our hike, including young frolicking together and several mothers with young.

 

baby guanaco photo

These three baby guanacos entertained us for some time with their playing

We saw herds and herds of guanaco. The young are adorable and several of us want one. Guanaco are related to camels and it really shows in their head shape.

Unfortunately, we saw almost as many bones and carcasses as live ones. Our guide said they call this area the cafeteria for pumas. We thought it would be cool to see one catch a guanaco,  but no.

vertebrea photo by S. Reichard

We found ample proof that puma hunt the guanacos here. Jim Heg holds up a vertebrae.

We also saw fox, condors, eagles, and oh yeah, a bunch of cool plants. We had lunch by a huge waterfall. We understand Dan’s group made it to the base, but they have not returned to camp yet.

Tomorrow we will say a sad farewell to Patagonia, though because we ate the Berberis buxifolia fruits, we will return someday. We will return to Santiago and late Saturday we will start the journey to Seattle. We all feel like the visits to Juan Grimm’s gardens were on another trip. It has been fantastic and our group is the best assembled – ever. We have loved traveling together and learning from each other.

When I get back to Seattle I will post better photos and some reflections on the trip. In the meantime, adios.

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Chile Tour 2011: Roughing it in Patagonia

January 26th, 2011 by Sarah Reichard
Patagonia scene by S. Reichard

We are in Patagonia. STOP. Weather is great. STOP. Yurts are fabulous! STOP. We will not be returning. STOP. So sorry. STOP. Have a nice life. STOP

This may have been the most satisfying day yet. We all chose to do a hike that included an overlook to Gray Glacier and Gray Lake beneath it. Huge blue icebergs were in the lake- we saw two big chunks calve off as we hiked, splashing into the water with huge spray. The Torres del Paine massive was in the background. Sad to say, the plants took a bit of a backseat to the spectacular scenery, but we saw Escallonia rubra and E. Virgata, a couple of orchid species, and several other cool species.

Our afternoon hike was also fabulous and we saw two Andean condors soaring beneath us on the cliffs. I got photos on my Canon but will have to wait until I am back in the world of fast computers to include them in the blog.

Our phenomenal weather continues. Our guides say there are only a few days a year like this here. We could hike in just t-shirts and jeans. It looks like it may continue tomorrow, our last field day (boo!).

Berberis buxifolia ice cream by S. Reichard

This was dessert tonight. The purple ice cream is from Berberis buxifolia, which legend says if you eat, you will return to Patagonia. This was the best dessert ever.


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Chile Tour 2011: Exciting Days in the Lake District

January 25th, 2011 by Sarah Reichard
Araucaria forest in Chile by S. Reichard

Monkey puzzle trees frame Volcan Lanin

Auracaria! Embothrium! Drimys! Oh my! We have had exciting few days in the Lake District, seeing old friends from our gardens and being captivated by new ones. We arrived in the area and nearly immediately went into the Andes to see Auracaria auracana in the wild. While this species brings both love and hate in Seattle, including among our group, everyone agreed it looked splendid in the wild, silhouetted against Volcan Lanín. We also did a short hike in the area, seeing lots of Alstroemeria aurantiaca (a weed here, though native) and Mutsia spinosa. Embothrium coccineum was flowering too.

Araucaria photo by S. Reichard

Nita Jo Rountree and Shelagh Tucker take photos of Susie and Jennifer Marglin

Yesterday we did a fantastic hike most of the day in a private conservation area that is designed to preserve Aextoxicon punctatum, a rare tree that almost does not exist in the wild because of its harvest for wood. The Valdivian rain forest here was really exciting and we raced from plant to plant exclaiming over the Luma apiculata, the ferns both huge and tiny, and sweet-smelling Myrceugenia. As we walked, we spotted the orange flowers of Mitraria coccinea on the path – this epiphyte was up high and we mostly saw it this way. I grow it in-ground in Seattle and it does VERY well for me. The forest was thick with vines of the Chilean national flower, Lapageria rosea, which may be my very favorite flower of all time. I grow it in Seattle and cherish the flowers, though it may be hard to grow in the colder parts of our area. Sadly, we were about six weeks too early to see it flower, though if all those vines had been dripping in flowers, you would probably never see us again. This hike would have been outstanding for the fabulous forest, but the fact that it was also set among the spectacular scenery along the Pacific Ocean did not hurt.

fitzroya photo by S. Reichard

Fitzroya cupressoides (alerce) is related to our native western red cedar and is considered rare due to overharvest

We also did a hike in Lahuen Nadi Park, which is set aside to protect Fitzroya cupressoides (alerce) another tall tree now rare because of over-harvest. This forest was also a humid forest, but very different from the other. The underbrush was thick with native bamboos (Chusquea species) and some of my beloved Drimys winteri. Lapageria relative Philesia magellanica was just opening here (Dan impishly tucked one behind his ear and tried to convince me that it was Lapageria – he had me going for about 2 seconds). It is similar to Lagageria, but smaller and less deeply colored. We also saw the wonderful flowers of Desfontainia spinosa, another favorite of mine, though only very high up. These flowers look like orange candy corns dangling from branches with holly-like leaves. I grow this in Seattle, but have not gotten it to flower and recently my mountain beavers attacked it, so I don’t know if I will ever get it to flower.

Philesia magellanica photo by S. Reichard

Philesia magellanica is a beautiful shrub that grows both in the ground and as an epiphyte

Herbarium in Santiago photo by S. Reichard

Children working the vegetable gardens of Herbarium, near Santiago

I would be remiss if I did not recount our last day in the north as well. We visited an inspirational place near Santiago called “Herbarium” which has nothing to do with herbaria such as our Hyde Herbarium. Instead, they focus on horticultural therapy and the use of plants to heal those with physical and mental problems. Perhaps most important, they work with kids 3-14 that are from families with problems. Somewhat similar to Seattle Youth Garden Works, a collaboration we share with Seattle Tilth and work with at-risk teenagers, this program provides children with healing and learning.

Wine tasting photo by S. Reichard

Our group tastes wines at the De Martino winery

We also spent time in the wine country, especially at a winery called De Martino. We had probably the best wine making tour I have ever had and then tasted three wines. The signature wine of Chile is the Carménère. The story is fascinating. The vines have been grown as merlot for years, about 15 years ago a French viticulturist was visiting and recognized it as different. DNA testing showed it was a different variety and now it is a very popular red wine.

We have been blessed with absolutely spectacular weather – crazy good, actually. Here in the Lake District it has been sunny and just perfect for hiking – warm, but not so hot that you overheat as you hike. I hope this continues the rest of our trip!

photo by S. Reichard

The new Chilean miners emerge! From left, Mary Palmer, Joanne White, Susie Marglin, Jennifer Marglin, Denise Lane, and Debby Riehl stand in a soil pit at the De Martino winery. The pit is used to monitor roots and water movement subsurface.

 

photo of hikers in Chile by S. Rechard

Our group of hikers in the coastal forest preserve for Aextoxicon punctatum, a tree edenmic to the Valdivian rain forests.

Tomorrow we head south for our final, and perhaps most exciting adventure – a visit to Torres del Paine National Park. None of us, including Dan or me, have been there before. Dan and I had to bear keeping a terrible secret from the group for a few days – when we first got here there was civil unrest over an increase in the cost of natural gas and tourism to the Park was blocked! It was resolved a few days ago and the adventure is on!

I hope you  guys are all good.

Sarah

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January Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

January 21st, 2011 by Pat Chinn-Sloan

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum for the 2nd half of January 2011

  1. Cedrus libani ssp. Atlantica (Atlas cedar)
  2. Chimonanthus praecox (Wintersweet)
  3. Eucalyptus pauciflora (Cabbage gum)
  4. Lonicera standishii
  5. Poncirus trifoliata (Hardy orange)

Complete details.

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Chile Tour 2011: Wowed by the amazing gardens

January 19th, 2011 by Sarah Reichard

Wow! No wait, that is not good enough. WOW! No, still not enough. WOWWOWWOWWOW!!!! We saw some amazing gardens designed by Juan Grimm, a Chilean architect who has designed over 300 fabulous gardens. On Monday night he gave us a talk about his design philosophy and showed many photos. His philosophy would fit into Seattle very well. He believes the garden should fit into the existing landscape and, while he uses non-native plants, he also uses natives, but arranges them as a garden. He integrates the house and the garden together. At that point, as I was writing (“like Windcliff” – Dan Hinkley’s home and garden – into my notes, Mary Palmer leaned over to me and whispered “like Windcliff!”). Señor Grimm also believes that the existing conditions should be taken into account and gardens formed around them. At one garden he designed there was hardpan. Rather than fight that, he created a garden with ephemeral ponds.

Grimm pool photo

The pool at Juan Grimm´s house

The first garden we saw with Señor Grimm was one he started designing in 1984 for Pedro Tomas Allende (yes, related to the famous Chilean Allende family). This 20 acre garden was a delight! Agapanthus, with flower heads as big as humans, with orange daylilies behind, with an overstory of palms native to Uruguay. The gardens went on and on, with beds of Clivia, an aviary, and so much more the mind reels. I am not a huge hydrangea fan, but behind his house he has a large pond and at the far side is a sweep of pink mophead hydrangeas that were gorgeous!

Allende - hydrangea photo

Hydrangeas, as viewed from Senor Allende's house

Allende garden photo

This is the entry to the Allende garden, with an overstory of palms from Uruguay and Agapanthus with flower heads the size of human heads!

In front of his house, leading to the main garden, there were stairs that were topped in grass that one ascended from a patio that had pavers of fossilized wood. The same pavers were repeated, polished, in the home. Señor Allende was very gracious and served us refreshments on his patio overlooking the pond.

The second garden was that of Tomas Muller, who is currently the Chilean ambassador to the United Kingdom. This is a very modern house, perched on a cliff above the Pacific Ocean. We were also able to tour the house, which features fabulous art by Chileans, along with the fantastic view and gardens. Here, he has created a very naturalistic garden, again with a mixture of natives accented with interesting non-natives, that blends into the native landscape beyond.

Muller garden photo

Jim Heg climbs the rocks at the Muller Garden

The last garden we saw was his own, again perched on a cliff above the sea, a bit too close for comfort for those of us with a healthy fear of heights. In fact, the deck off the master bedroom was literally perched at the edge of a steep cliff, with no railing at all. Not a house for children, pets, night-walkers, or partiers! But the house was again beautifully integrated into the landscape, with a pool at the edge of the cliff.

Grimm garden phots

The view from Juan Grimm´s bedroom balcony is beautiful, but the drop is steep and there is no rail, so be careful!

Besides gardens, we also visited some Chilean wine palms (Jubaea chilensis) near the national park set aside for them. We planted a few of these in the new Gateway to Chile garden in the Washington Park Arboretum last fall. These were huge and I am excited about the potential for our new display in the garden.

The group learns more about the Chilean wine palm (Jubaea chilensis), a rare palm that is included in the Arboretum´s new Gateway to Chile display

wine palm fruit photo

One of the reasons the wine palm is so rare is because the large fruits are a favorite food, so not enough young plants are regenerating

We have been enjoying wonderful food, especially seafood. Two and three hour lunches and dinners with multiple courses are common and we are all feeling a bit snug in our clothes. Fortunately, next week will involve much more hiking and hopefully we will work it off. Our group has also discovered pisco sours, a delicious blend of the clear brandy that Chileans are very proud of, with lemons, a bit of sugar, and a dash of bitters. They go down a little too easily! We have also been enjoying the excellent Chilean wines at lunch and dinner. Chileans certainly know how to live the good life!

tour group photo

We enjoy one of several leisurely lunches

But lest you think we have just been imbibing, we have also been enjoying the excellent fruit juices. This morning I had melon and peach juices (separately, not mixed) and they were amazing. We have also sampled raspberry and strawberry juices. Why don’t we have these wonderful fresh juices in the States?

Speaking of wine, tomorrow we tour the wine country and visit some of the oldest wineries in the country. We will cap the evening off with a dinner followed by traditional Chilean dancing, as we had at the dedication to the Gateway to Chile celebration last fall. On the 21st we are off to the Lake District and a whole new set of adventures.

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Chile Tour 2011: Having fun in Santiago

January 18th, 2011 by Sarah Reichard

We all arrived, weather is great, and we met Juan Grimm and are excited about seeing some gardens he designed. Details later.

Mime in Santiago photo

Nita Jo Roundtree marries a mime in Santiago's Plaza de Armas! Husband Randy looks on and later pays dowry


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CUH Update – January 2011: A frosty start to a new year

January 11th, 2011 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes

The start of the new year brings with it a bit of sad news as one of our gardeners here at CUH has decided to take another position that’s full time, leaving just two half-time gardeners to oversee the grounds here. With our staff so limited as it is to oversee all aspects of the work we do and a budget that’s going to see more cuts, getting a new gardener sometime soon is highly unlikely. So, we certainly have challenges ahead of us, but we move forward.

January has traditionally been the coldest month of they year, but with our cold snap of November and drab December, I’m just praying that we don’t endure anymore severe fluctuations in temperature and prolonged subfreezing temperatures. So many plants have been hit and we’re all just waiting for signs of spring to distract us from our worries. Luckily, daffodils are showing signs of life as are the lovely Hellebores we are most excited about watching bloom in the next couple of weeks! You might remember ‘Josef Lemper’ from last year along with ‘Jacob’, ‘Pink Frost’ and the highly anticipated ‘Walburton’s Rosemary’. Then come the x hybridus selections that will be standouts in the Soest Garden for sure!!

We’ve also been trying to plant, if soil allows us so, and our focus has been getting our vine collection out of the nursery and into the grounds of CUH. Several grape species (Vitis) have been installed to clamber around the Southwest side of Merrill Hall and a few Clematis species climbing or carpeting the slopes of the Stormwater Garden. They’ve been mulched well in the hopes they survive the transplant well and establish as quickly as possible.

The McVay Courtyard will undergo a bit of a facelift to help spruce up the site with the addition of a new maple tree, flowering perennials and bulbs and the relocation of a large specimen of Edgeworthia chrysantha that will need to carefully be dug and transplanted to two possible locations. You might recall this plant suffering from the cold last month, so we will try and find a more sheltered location for it.

Now with more snow in the forecast, we have to pace ourselves and pray we get everything we want to get done, accomplished. It’s mother nature; you always have to try and work with it, never against it!

I’m sure it’ll be forgiving, it always seems to be.

Think spring….and tell it to hurry!!

Riz

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New Endowment Established for Arboretum Maintenance

January 7th, 2011 by Tech Librarian, Tracy Mehlin

western red cedar photoGordon and Irene Bergum will be remembered for their love of gardening (Irene in particular was passionate about flowers) and their generosity. They had a large, beautiful garden, and their intimate knowledge of all that was involved in maintaining it impelled them to set up a trust. At their passing, the trust created the Gordon and Irene Bergum Endowed Fund to help ensure that the Washington Park Arboretum has ongoing funds for maintenance. The UW Botanic Gardens is deeply grateful for their support.

Thank you to the Gordon and Irene Bergum Trust and everyone else who gave a gift and/or volunteered their time to UWBG in 2010.  Donors and volunteers are critical to the continued success of UW Botanic Gardens.

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Chile Tour 2011: UWBG Professor Sarah Reichard reports on a plant-filled tour of Chile

January 6th, 2011 by Sarah Reichard

We’re off to Chile for gardens, forests, wine, and adventure! Dan Hinkley and I are taking a group of 12 free spirits to this beautiful South American country for two weeks of adventure and camaraderie.

It has been 23 years since I was last in Chile, doing field work for my Master of Science degree on Drimys winteri. It was a very different place politically, under the leadership of the military dictator, Augusto Pinochet. The country is now a democracy that elected a woman president in 2006, so I am expecting social change, but I hope the country is still as beautiful as I remember it. We will be going to many of the same places I visited in 1988, such as Volcan Osorno, where I recall seeing the monkey puzzle tree (Araucaria auracana) silhouetted against the dramatic snow-topped mountains – I expected to see dinosaurs come wandering by!

Volcan Osorno in Chile

Volcan Osorno looks little like Mt. Rainier, but the vegetation around it is totally different!

We have worked with Holbrooke Travel to provide a diversity of experiences for our group. We will start out in Santiago, where we will meet noted landscape architect, Juan Grimm. He will be taking us to several special award-winning private gardens, some of which he designed. While in the north we will also be spending a day in Maipo Valley tasting wines, including those of Vina Undurraga, one of the oldest wineries in Chile.

We then head south to the Lakes District, including Valdivia, where I spent much time while working on my thesis, so I am really excited to see it again. The emphasis on this part of the trip will be on the amazing forests of this region. We will be visiting a 160 coastal private reserve, where we will see rare native plants, such as Fitzroya cupressoides (alerce), which is related to our western red cedar.  We will also visit several national parks and see the Philippi Botanical Gardens at Temuco University – it is the oldest botanic garden in Chile.

Fitzroya photo

Fitzroya has been overused for wood and is now considered rare

Our final destination is one of the most beautiful spots on earth – Torres del Paine. This huge national park has spectacular rock formations and an amazing flora and fauna. The diversity of plant forms leads to large mammal populations, like guanacos, a few species of fox, and pumas. We may also see the Andean condor!  The weather there can be a little unpredictable, but we are hoping to hike and possibly kayak while we are there. We are going to be staying in yurts at Patagonia Camp, which sound really fun. The camp has been built to have minimal impact on the environment, while allowing guests to fully experience the nature that surrounds them.

Torres del Paine massif photo

This is the iconic Torres del Paine massif, which gives the National Park its name.

Technology permitting, and with the help of UWBG tech whiz, Tracy Mehlin, I will be blogging about our trip on this page, so check back starting around January 18th to join us virtually on this trip.

Sarah Reichard, Professor and UWBG Associate Director

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January 2011 Plant Profile: Cornus sericea ‘Flaviramea’

January 5th, 2011 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes

The winter landscape is incomplete without the presence of twig-dogwoods. Their stately, yet elegant stems, vibrant color and imposing form in the garden is remarkable. What’s more impressive is their adaptability and ease of growth. They are tolerant of most soils, are drought tolerant once established and the ability to recover from almost being mowed down to the ground each spring and produce brightly colored stems the following winter is extraordinary. From a plant production point of view, they root easily from natural layers (when stems come into contact with the soil and begin forming roots) and a ecological restoration technique called “live-staking”, where sections of mature stems are simply plunged into a container or directly into the ground and root. These cut stems are also prized by florist and the slimmest stems are used for basket-weaving.

The one represented here is a striking stand of them at the Center for Urban Horticulture’s Soest Garden flanked my various ornamental grasses, heaths and heathers create an amazing, low-maintenance plant combination that anyone can replicate in their home gardens.

Even with our early snowfall last November, the imposing stems of yellow-twig dogwood stand out and dried flower heads capture a few flakes creating a glittering effect from a distance

Common Name: Yellow-twig dogwood
Location: CUH: Soest Garden South Slope, WPA: Witt Winter Garden Family: Cornaceae
Origin: Garden Origin
Height: 6-8ft.
Spread: 7-8ft.
Bloom Time: Early Summer
Bloom Type/Color: Umbels of white flowers on the tips of stems.
Water/Soil: Moist to moderately dry. Drought tolerant once established.

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