CUH Update – February 2011: Show Time

February 22nd, 2011 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes

Apologies for the delay in getting an update posted. We’ve had several little projects we’re trying to complete and we are getting numerous volunteer applications, which we have been going through and contacting interested individuals who are interested in helping us out in grounds.

Late winter brings with it a lot of planting and transplanting projects and our major one so far this year has been the relocation of an established specimen of Edgeworthia crysantha from the McVay courtyard to a new location just north of the Miller Library.

Transplanted Edgeworthia in a bed just North of the Merrill Hall

Like its close relative, Daphne, Edgeworthia resents being moved around and the fact that it’s also recovering from the hard freeze of last November with just a few buds remaining to open, we did our best to get the largest rootball possible and replanted it immediately into its new location. Cross your fingers!

With more severe winter cold predicted to come our way again, we are keeping our eye out on a few plants that could suffer. Obviously, Edgeworthia is on that list along with the two large Osmanthus we have in the Fragrance Garden. Our poor Daphne bholua doesn’t deserve another hit; this poor plant hasn’t flowered for us in three winters.


Then there are the Azara microphylla, which are just starting to flower that could be hit with cold and the remaining buds zapped and our massive Cordyline australis on the south side of Issacson Hall is already a sorry looking site. So, basically, anything spectacularly fragrant is being monitored.  Hehe

Our first accessioned plant for 2011 has been planted here at CUH in a large Chinese container donated by a special donor that once held a beautiful cascading Japanese maple, but when it became too troublesome to keep up the watering and the foliage would crisp up in the summer sun, we had to replace it.

Detail of the fierce branches of Citrus ‘Flying Dragon’

The maple has moved into a new home in the Woodland Garden over at Washington Park Arboretum and, for awhile, the pot was empty until it was decided that we would seek out a specimen of Poncirus (Citrus) trifoliata ‘Flying Dragon’, a hardy citrus, to fill that void. Bloom River Nursery down in Oregon was able to provide us with a standardized specimen that’s been trained for ten years. It now graces the pot with its exquisite and somewhat sinister looking branches. It is highly unusual and will definitely be a conversation piece. Now we have to determine an under-planting so it doesn’t look so bare below.

Spring is definitely in the air when the sun decides to show itself and bulbs begin to bulge out of the ground and bloom their little heads of. Our annual show of yellow, cheerful, daffodils are just days away.

But for a real show, the 2011 Northwest Flower and Garden Show is finally here and UWBG has a most unusual booth this year thanks to our friends at Agua Verde Café and Paddle Club.

Rey Lopez generously donated a kayak for our display with one end cut off so it would stand and then it was planted up to make it look as if it had traveled to both sides of UWBG. Native flora and accessioned plants represented the Arboretum while more natives , including red-twig dogwoods and cattails complete with a “blue-tube” represent Foster Island and UBNA, while more exotic garden plants represented CUH.

Planted kayak that’s been through Lake Washington having collected materials from UWBG along the way

February is flying by so quickly with many activities taking place. The next few weeks should be spectacular (barring any serious cold snaps that will do certain plans in).

Cheers,

R

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February Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum
(Part II)

February 17th, 2011 by Pat Chinn-Sloan

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum for the 2nd half of February 2011

  1. Acer rubrum (Red maple)
  2. Magnolia stellata (Star magnolia)
  3. Pinus contorta (Shore pine)
  4. Quercus chrysolepis (Canyon live oak)
  5. Viburnum rhytidophyllum (Leatherleaf viburnum)

Complete details.

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Past and Present: Continuing the Tradition of Restoration in UBNA

February 17th, 2011 by Jake Milofsky - UBNA RA

Earlier this season as we were getting ready for a new quarter of restoration work in the Union Bay Natural Area, a friend supplied me with her wonderful collection of photographs from the 2004 planting of UBNA’s “blue tube forest”.  It was a pleasure to be given a look back in time to the beginning of this project, as I have only been familiar with UBNA for a mere 2 years.  During the 2004 project, students planted over 1,000 bare root trees into what was then a grassy field, mulched these new seedlings, and protected them with blue plastic planting tubes.  Today, as anyone who strolls along Wahkiakum Lane well knows, that area is certainly not a grassy field any more!

In addition to the planting, students also participated in a Native American ceremony to bring the bald eagles back to UBNA; an effort whose success our birding friends can attest to.

Let’s have a look back to 2004:

(All 2004 photos courtesy of Katie Murphy)

Looking east from within the planting area

Looking north from within the planting area. The three mature trees just off of Wahkiakum Lane still provide good reference points for this image

Students also participated in a Native American ceremony to bring bald eagles back to UBNA

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Walking through UBNA today, one notices many of these once tiny cherry, poplar, ash, willow, and alder seedlings have matured into healthy saplings, filling in the canopy of this new woodland.  In more recent years, the overall diversity has been increased with supplemental plantings of conifer species such as western red cedar and Douglas fir.

What a difference 7 years can make!

Unfortunately the woodland restoration plot has also been impacted by invasive Himalayan blackberry, which competes with the desired woodland species for important resources and threatens the overall health of this newly established ecosystem.  This invasion has been consistently managed over the years and will remain a perennial effort until the canopy is mature enough to cast shade over the blackberry plants, bringing them under a natural control.

Fortunately, UBNA has many friends in both the UW community and the general public who have given their time over the years to help nurture this newly established woodland, and 2011 has been no different!  During the winter quarter there have already been 3 volunteer work parties, with several more scheduled throughout the rest of the academic year.

UW students and members of the general public alike provide valuable volunteer support in the maintenance of UBNA's restoration sites.

If these efforts sound intriguing, you too can join the efforts to create healthy native ecosystems in the Union Bay Natural Area.  For info on upcoming volunteer work parties, have a look at the UWBG’s volunteer calendar and register for an upcoming event.  You’re guaranteed to leave feeling a sense of accomplishment, and you may even see a bald eagle!

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Foster Island spider appears to be new species

February 16th, 2011 by Jennifer Youngman, Communications Specialist

You may recall that last spring’s BioBlitz in the Washington Park Arboretum resulted in some interesting finds, thanks to the efforts of more than 100 citizen scientists, university students and professionals. Here’s an update on one of those discoveries.

Foster Island Philodromus spiderRod Crawford, Curator of Arachnids at the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, reports, “I just finished fully curating the spiders from last May’s Foster Island bioblitz. The unusual Philodromus crab spider from the Waterside Trail, is not P. imbecillus nor is it P. insperatus (only member of the imbecillus group known from Washington). It is very similar to an Atlantic-states species Philodromus marxi, but is more likely to be an altogether new species. Full confirmation will have to await more specimens including males, but we can tentatively consider it new.”

The Foster Island female spider’s reproductive organs don’t match those of Philodromus insperatus, a spider found in this state but mainly in sagebrush country. And the Atlantic states’ P. marxi’s body coloration is metallic, very different from that of the spider found on Foster Island. And so the research continues.

Rod Crawford maintains a website called The Spider Myths Site. Interestingly, two of the myths are “Spiders are easy to identify” and “The spider you found has to be a species you’ve already heard of.”

Photograph by Rod Crawford

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Sign up for Summer Camp

February 15th, 2011 by Arboretum Education Supervisor, Patrick Mulligan

Summer campers photoJoin us for summer time fun, adventure and environmental education at our themed summer camps. Find out how you can become an ethnobotanist, urban farmer or a field biologist.

Register for Summer Camp today!

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February Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

February 7th, 2011 by Pat Chinn-Sloan

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum for February 2011

  1. Azara microphylla (Boxleaf Azara)
  2. Garrya x issaquahensis (Hybrid Silk Tassel)
  3. Ilex sp. (Holly)
  4. Leptospermum lanigerum (Silky tea tree)
  5. Sycopsis sinensis (Chinese Fighazel)

Complete details.

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February 2011 Plant Profile: The Genus Galanthus

February 4th, 2011 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes
Galanthus nivalis by R. Reyes

Galanthus nivalis in the Fragrance Garden

We have several forms of the dainty and delicate snowdrop growing here at the Center for Urban Horticulture. Of all spring emphemeral bulbs, Galanthus have been revered and loved for many centuries and have always been the harbingers of spring as their noses poke up and their gentle blossoms push through the snow. It’s quite a dazzling image.

The popularity of Galanthus have suaded plant collectors, more specifically known as “Galanthophiles”, to seek out the rares forms and long lost hybrids that mostly exist amongst growers in the United Kingdom.

Supposedly, a single bulb of a exceedingly rare variant of Galathus was sold on eBay for well over $500 as stated in this article. The facts about the actual plant and terms of sale was somehow not clear.
The exceptionally large flower of Galanthus plicatus ‘EA Bowles’ that sold for £357 at auction

Not everyone need pay close to that amount to enjoy the sparkling beauty of snowdrops in the late winter. Often you can purchase a bag of bulbs (Most commonly available species G. nivalis and G. elwesii) in the fall or purchase potted plants blooming right about now at specialty nurseries. They naturalize and multiply when left undisturbed and they thrive in sun or shade in well drained soils.

An unusual double-flowered Galanthus nivalis 'Flore Pleno'

Come see them now in full bloom here at CUH!

Common Name: Snowdrops
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Location: CUH: Soest Garden, Fragrance Garden, McVay Courtyard (double flowered forms)
Origin: Original species come from Eastern regions of Europe.
Height: 3-6″ tall
Spread: mature colonies of bulbs can cover a square foot or more.
Bloom Time: Mid-Winter-Early Spring
Bloom Type/Color: Composed of tepals prodominantly white in color with various variations
Water/Soil: Moist to moderately dry. Drought tolerant once established.

Pure white


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Chile Tour 2011: A Joyful Romp Around Chile

February 4th, 2011 by Sarah Reichard

Now that I have been back a couple of days, this is the phrase that keeps coming back to describe our trip. We were happy to be there, happy to be experiencing everything together, and amazed at how much we did in such a short time. At the end of the trip we were trying to remember our first full day and it seemed like months, rather than weeks, had passed.

friends photo

Susie Marglin and Dan Hinkley joyfully rock out after dinner at Patagonia Camp

The first part of the trip was a joyful romp through the gardens of gardens designed by Juan Grimm. The Allende garden was one marvel after another of both design and horticultural skill. The Muller and Grimm gardens combined spectacular scenery with well-chosen and placed plants and other garden elements. We also enjoyed the fine foods and wines of the northern areas.

The Lakes District found us frolicking through temperate forests with plants that were both exotic to us, like Philesia magellanicaand common, like monkey puzzle (Auracaria auracana). The Valdivian rain forest was especially exciting, because there are so many gorgeous plants we can potentially grow here. Some, like Gunnera tinctoria and Embothrium coccineum, have found their way into collectors’ gardens, but there are so many more.  Dan stayed behind for a week to collect more for potential use in future gardens at the University of Washington Botanic Gardens, so stay tuned!

We finish with a truly joyous stay in Patagonia, exploring Torres del Paine National Park. Everything there was wonderful! Patagonia Camp, where we stayed, had amazing views and food and it made a perfect home base. My blog entry about us not returning was only half in jest. That first day we walked around with huge grins on our faces, taking in the scenery and plants in something of a daze. We saw chunks calve off the icebergs with a huge splash into the lake, orchids in full flower, baby guanaco chasing each other like puppies, and an Andean condor soared beneath our cliff, giving us full view of its splendor. We had sunny weather there that our guides said they had not seen for months.

Each of us found our individual joys. I was very pleased that Spanish came back to me very quickly. The first day, in a jetlagged fog, I tried to order a double latte at Starbuck’s (yes, they are all over Santiago) and got two lattes instead. Hey, it got the job done. But just a week later words were returning to me and I was conversant, if not fluent, and that made me very happy. I also learned I love yurts. I did not know this about myself, but I found great joy in my cozy yurt with a view. I now want a yurt of my own, preferably with a view of Torres del Paine.

sunrise photo

The sunrise is reflected on the Torres del Paine massif - as seen from laying in bed in my yurt!

One of the greatest joys was in being together, sharing such an intense experience with amazing people. Some of us knew each other at least a little at the start, but all of us were friends by the end. I look forward to our planned reunions and to sharing future experiences with them.

I want to thank Tracy Mehlin for her support on the technical end of this blog. I knew going into it that there would be challenges and computer access and speed were certainly difficult once I left Santiago, but by sending updates over my Droid phone, we were still able to keep you all abreast of our activities.

Where will UWBG go next? We are talking to Holbrook about possibilities, so stay tuned!

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