The Science and Practice of Sustainable Sites

August 26th, 2011 by Tech Librarian, Tracy Mehlin

Three stand-alone Tuesday evening sessions: 6:30–8:30pm at CUH, September 20; September 27; October 4.

$30 per event; $50 for two; $75 for three, with an additional 10% early-bird discount by EOB September 9.

Approved for Landscape Architecture Continuing Education System (LACES) credits.

Register online, call 206-685-8033 with a credit card, or mail in this downloadable registration form.

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Tuesday, September 20

“The Science and Practice of Sustainable Sites: Observations from Two Parks Pilot Projects”

6:30 – 8:30 pm, 2.0 LACES PDH

This session will compare and contrast how the SITES™ process applies to two Seattle Parks e

Bradner Park Fence image

Bradner Park Fence

nrolled in the Sustainable Sites (SITES) Initiative’s Pilot Program: Bradner Gardens Park, an existing park; and Kirke Park, a park in development. Participants will gain an understanding of the application of SITES to different project types as project-team leads share their experiences with SITES and compare notes on their decision-making and documentation processes. Team members will review how they determined the appropriate credits, show sample documentation from credit requirements, and speculate on possible lessons learned from the process. The event will conclude with a lively dialog about how SITES may influence Seattle Parks’ design, operations, maintenance, and marketing, and conversely how the pilot projects may inform SITES standards. This training is intended for design professionals, site owners, and landscape contractors who want to learn how to effectively contribute to the team-oriented process of creating and documenting sustainable landscapes.

“Observations from Two Parks Pilot Projects” is a standalone course in an evening series exploring the Sustainable Sites Initiative and the sustainable practices that will enable built landscapes to support ecological functions and regenerate natural resources. We examine the SITES metric and its use as a tool to effect change through the lens of our instructors’ experiences with SITES pilot projects and other performance-based tools. This series is co-sponsored by UW Botanic Gardens, the Washington Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (WASLA) and Seattle Public Utilities.

Karen Galt is a landscape architect and coordinates the Irrigation Conservation Program for the Stewardship and Sustainability Unit of Seattle Parks and Recreation. For nearly twelve years Karen has worked for Parks in neighborhood planning and park development; her work has recently focused on maintenance operations.

Clayton Beaudoin, MLA, LEED AP®. With a background in the environmental community, Clayton’s landscape-architecture experience includes several LEED certified buildings, creek daylighting, neighborhood development, and several regional and neighborhood parks.

 

Tuesday, September 27

“The Science and Practice of Sustainable Sites: Practical Implementation of Soil Protection”

6:30 – 8:30 pm, 2.0 LACES PDH

Effective soil protection starts early in planning and doesn’t stop with best intentions. This seminar will prepare design, construction and landscape professionals to meet the Sustainable Sites (SITES™) Initiative’s soil benchmarks as well as Washington’s required Post-Construction Soil Best Management Practices, which the SITES requirements are modeled on. After an introduction to soil functions and ecosystems, we’ll discuss best practices in soil protection and restoration, the soil management plan, materials selection, and writing effective specifications. We’ll discuss construction strategies for both large and small sites — sequencing, equipment and coordinating on-site teams, as well as ongoing practices for soil regeneration.

“Practical Implementation of Soil Protection” is a standalone course in an evening series exploring the Sustainable Sites Initiative and the sustainable practices that will enable built landscapes to support ecological functions and regenerate natural resources. We examine the SITES metric and its use as a tool to effect change through the lens of our instructors’ experiences with SITES pilot projects and other performance-based tools. This series is co-sponsored by UW Botanic Gardens, the Washington Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (WASLA) and Seattle Public Utilities.

David McDonald is a resource conservation planner at Seattle Public Utilities, leads SPU’s professional training program and Washington’s Soils for Salmon project, and serves on the national SITES technical core committee.

Howard Stenn is a design consultant and co-author of Washington State’s Soil BMPs with extensive site development, specification, and soil best practice professional education experience.

Jim Berger is Senior Construction Manager at Port Blakely Communities, teaches CESCL erosion courses, and coordinates construction teams and installation processes. He shares with our other presenters a keen interest in sustainability and soil.

 

Tuesday, October 4

 “The Science and Practice of Sustainable Sites: Watering without Waste”

6:30 – 8:30 pm, 2.0 LACES PDH

Resource-savvy irrigation is more than a technical skill; it requires the communication, forethought and systems thinking of an integrated team. This two-hour session will provide an irrigation technical overview and prepare professionals for the requirements of the Sustainable Sites Initiative (SITES™). The instructors lead you through the water conservation prerequisites and credits, as well as strategic approaches that support SITES’ multiple objectives. Planning for plant establishment, life-cycle and ongoing maintenance involves good communication and documentation. We’ll explore irrigation efficiency, materials, the influence of maintenance on design, the appropriate use of drip systems and temporary irrigation, and weaning off supplemental water. We’ll tap into the experience of our instructors, including a SITES pilot project that looks ahead to disconnection.

“Watering without Waste” is a standalone course in an evening series exploring the Sustainable Sites Initiative and the sustainable practices that will enable built landscapes to support ecological functions and regenerate natural resources. We examine the SITES metric and its use as a tool to effect change through the lens of our instructors’ experiences with SITES pilot projects and other performance-based tools. This series is co-sponsored by UW Botanic Gardens, the Washington Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (WASLA) and Seattle Public Utilities.

David Hilgers, ASLA, LEED AP®, works for R Miller Construction as a landscape architect and sustainability advisor, and integrates sustainable design and construction practice in all types of development.

Matt Suhadolnik, ASLA, LEED AP®, is a landscape architect with SvR Design, where he collaborates with other engineering, landscape architecture, and planning professions on well integrated, sustainable solutions.

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