Trees Cheer for Community Volunteers!

April 30th, 2013 by UWBG Horticulturist

As we bid adieu to relentless April showers, let’s also praise a fond farewell to over 300 relentless April community service volunteers that helped support the stewardship of our beautiful botanic gardens. Because of them, May flowers have never looked and smelled soooo good.

Student Conservation Association 2013 Earth Day at the Washington Park Arboretum. Photo curtesy of SCA.org

Student Conservation Association 2013 Earth Day at the Washington Park Arboretum. Photo curtesy of SCA.org

The 3 Big April events:

    1. April 13, Earth Day in the Arboretum w/ Student Conservation Association – see photos http://www.flickr.com/photos/the-sca/sets/72157633264603184/
    2. April 19, UW Partners w/ Starbucks for Earth Day at CUH and Farm- see video

  1.  April 25, Ivy Out w/ Seattle Prep  – a few photos below
Seattle Prep students removing ivy in the hollies

Seattle Prep students removing ivy in the hollies

Seattle Prep students removing ivy in Pinetum

Seattle Prep students removing ivy in Pinetum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A few of the impressive metrics:

  • Over 22,000 sq feet of invasive plants removed (ivy and blackberry)!
  • Over 60 yrds of mulch spread!
  • Over 1500 native plants planted!
  • Over 20 yrds of ivy hauled!
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Friends write history of Yesler Swamp at CUH

April 30th, 2013 by UWBG Communication Staff

Many of us know of Henry Yesler, one of Seattle’s forefathers, but what is Yesler Swamp on the east side of the Center for Urban Horticulture? And why are the Friends of Yesler Swamp trying to restore this natural area on the edge of the Laurelhurst neighborhood?
Read this facinating history to find out.

Photo by Jean Colley

Photo by Jean Colley


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Perennial Possibilities

April 24th, 2013 by Jessica Farmer, Adult Education Supervisor

Do you want a low-maintenance garden that is perpetually colorful and interesting?
You can have it all!Perennials The Gardeners Reference

Join us for upcoming classes in our Perennial Series with Carrie Becker to learn how.

These classes involve both classroom lectures and field trips to see how the concepts can be applied in your own garden.

Space is still available in these classes, and you can register online.

Perennial Companions
2-part class: Wednesday, May 15th, 7:00 – 8:30pm, and Saturday, May 18th, 1:00 – 3:30pm
Fee: Early-bird discount $50; $60 after May 12

In this class you will learn how to put plants together in satisfying combinations that endure and to use site information (such as sun, shade, dryness, etc.) to place companion plants who need similar conditions together, while taking color, form and texture into account.

After the Shade
2-part class: Wednesday, June 19th, 7:00 – 8:30pm, and Saturday, June 22nd, 1:00 – 3:30pm
Fee: Early-bird discount $50; $60 after June 16

Is your formerly sunny garden becoming shady with maturing trees and shrubs? Or do you have areas of existing shade? This class will teach you how to plant for shade and still have beautiful enduring plants from early spring through fall. Learn to love the shade!

Instructor Carrie Becker is co-author of Perennials: The Gardener’s Reference, and has spent 40 years immersed in the study of plants as a gardener, professional landscape designer, consultant, and educator. One of the original designers of the Northwest Perennial Alliance Borders at the Bellevue Botanical Garden, she has taught classes about perennials, bulbs, annuals, and biennials in the horticultural department at Edmonds Community College in Lynnwood, Washington for 17 years. Carrie has written articles for Horticulture, Pacific Horticulture, Arboretum Bulletin, and the Northwest Perennial Alliance and was a Hortus Praefectus of the Northwest Perennial Alliance in 2008. Carrie lectures in various garden clubs, nurseries, arboretums, and flower shows around the Northwest.

Like to plan ahead? Mark your calendar for the last class in the series:

Bulbs!
Wednesday, September 25, 2013, 7 – 9pm
Fee: Early-bird discount $30; $35 after September 18

This class will show you how to select and grow bulbous plants for all kinds of garden conditions. Find out which bulbs are enduring as perennials, pest resistant and hardy!

You can register online here: https://www.cfr.washington.edu/uwbg/ 

Questions? urbhort@uw.edu or 206.685.8033

Check out our other upcoming classes, too!

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Introducing our Summer Garden Guides

April 23rd, 2013 by Sarah Heller, Community Programs Coordinator & Fiddleheads Forest School Director

These enthusiastic, thoughtful and genuine folks are our Garden Guides for the UW Botanic Gardens Summer Camp at the Arboretum. They are charged with creating fun, educational, nature-based experiences for our campers. They have our 230 acre nature oasis to work with, their own experience and excitement to bring to the table, and a host of materials and curriculum to support their endeavors. Together we will build connection, community and nature awareness as we discover the wonders of the Arboretum. Each guide is paired with a high school student in our Junior Garden Guide program. We still have a few spots left in summer camp, come join us for a week of adventure!

 

Brian1Brian2Brian3

Brian Marienfeld, Summer Garden Guide

My name is Brian and I am blessed to have had an amazing journey in my life, from working for a wilderness therapy organization to getting my Masters at the University of Washington and IslandWood.  I am passionate about working with kids outdoors, hiking across this country, soul music, making pizza, and building strong caring communities to mention a few.  I fell in love with Washington many years ago and am so grateful for this opportunity to help others connect to this incredible place.  I look forward to bringing care and energy to my students and to the Arboretum community.

 

Tara1

Tara Nichol, Summer Garden Guide

Tara was born in Seattle and grew up exploring the beautiful Northwest forests, coasts, lakes and rivers during her childhood. Tara graduated in 2007 with a BA in Environmental Education from Fairhaven College in Bellingham, WA. She has worked in Outdoor Education for eight years leading backpacking trips, sailing, and teaching about local ecology.  Tara is trained as a Waldorf teacher, and loves the awe and beauty that outdoor experiences give to young people. She enjoys hiking, biking, singing and creating art.

 

 

 

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAStephanie Zanati, Summer Garden Guide

My name is Stephanie and I am thrilled to be a part of the UWBG Education Team this summer! I was born and raised in New York City, but I have spent the last 7 years teaching outdoors in many diverse landscapes across the country. I moved to the Puget Sound 2 years ago to continue to pursue my passion for education through the graduate program at Islandwood on Bainbridge Island. I have spent this last year teaching fourth grade in Seattle Public Schools and I am really excited to be returning to my roots in the outdoor classroom! When I am not teaching, I can usually be found biking, birding, or farming. I am looking forward to exploring and making lots of discoveries in the Arboretum this summer with your child!

 

Sarah1Sarah Heller, Camp Director

Sarah is a life long Seattle resident with deep northwest roots from her childhood years of playing outside and a strong interest in all things nature. She developed and piloted summer camp at the Arboretum three years ago and has since grown the program into what it is today – 7 weeks of outdoor, nature-based fun in the heart of Seattle. Sarah keeps herself busy by developing new programs and building community at the Arboretum. On the weekends Sarah can be found climbing, hiking, scrambling and backpacking in the mountains. Sarah is looking forward to connecting with returning families and meeting all the ones!

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Spring Scavenger Hunt

April 22nd, 2013 by Arboretum Education Supervisor, Patrick Mulligan
spring bloom

spring bloom

Spring is in full bloom at the Washington Park Arboretum. If you and the kids are looking for a fun way to enjoy the sights and smells of the season, stop by the Graham Visitors Center and pick up a Spring Scavenger Hunt clue sheet (or click the link below to print your own copy).

On your way out, check back in at the Visitors Center to redeem your completed clue sheet for a small prize. Good luck and happy spring!

spring_scavenger_hunt2013 as Word

spring_scavenger_hunt2013 as PDF

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More Maples in Bloom

April 19th, 2013 by Catherine Nelson, Adult Tours Program Assistant

big leaf maple flower

Our native Big Leaf Maples, Acer macrophyllum, are currently covered with dangling flowers.  Right now is one of my favorite times to view these giant native trees because the effect of all these flowers in the trees is stunning.   The flower clusters are about 4 inches long and 1 inch thick and because the tree has not foliated yet, they pop out like bright yellow/green ornaments.

To observe these flowers up close, you need to look for a low lying branch, not always easy to find on these huge trees.   The Park’s Free Weekend Walks for April through May will feature these and more spring blooms.

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April Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum
(Part II)

April 17th, 2013 by Pat Chinn-Sloan

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (April 15 - 28, 2013)

“Now it will Spring forth!”

1)  Acer macrophyllum    (Bigleaf maple)

  • Taken for granted around here, this time of year our Bigleaf maple is most eye-catching in flower.
  • It’s the subtle texture of its expanding leaf that drew my attention.
  • Located throughout our native matrix as the dominant deciduous forest tree.

2)  Aesculus wangii

  • A horse chestnut classified as vulnerable in its native habitat of Vietnam.
  • Notice the flattened bract-like stipule of the newly-expanding leaves.
  • Our young, marginally-hardy specimen is located in Loderi Valley.
Close-up view of Kalopanax septemlobus (Prickly castor-oil tree)

Close-up view of Kalopanax septemlobus (Prickly castor-oil tree)

3)  Kalopanax septemlobus    (Prickly castor-oil tree)

  • Deciduous tree from northeast Asia known for its “tropical” appearance in full-leaf.
  • I was impressed by the size of the bud bracts and pure white indumetum of the expanding leaves.
  • This specimen is located along the eastern side of Arboretum Creek, south of Boyer Ave. East

4)  Picea meyeri    (Meyer’s spruce)

  • Spruce tree native to China, similar in appearance to Colorado Blue spruce.
  • Quite striking, springing forth new needles in combination with red male and female cones.
  • Located in the Pinetum, just west of path and south of Stone Bridge.
Close-up of the poplar, Populus sp

Close-up view of the poplar, Populus sp

5)  Populus sp

  • The detail and color contrast in the expanding leaf is awesome!
  • This poplar is unidentified in our collections, but worthy of attention.
  • Located in the Poplar Collection, south Azalea Way.



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UWBG Bioblitz 2013 at the Washington Park Arboretum

April 9th, 2013 by Arboretum Education Supervisor, Patrick Mulligan

long_toed_salamanders_Christina_D

A bioblitz is a biological inventory that takes place over a short period of time (usually 24hrs) in a specified area (in this case the Washington Park Arboretum). The purpose of a bioblitz is to take a snap shot of biodiversity, which is a way to measure the health of an ecosystem. The more organisms found, the healthier the ecosystem. We value bioblitzes at the UWBG for a number of reasons: they’re a tool to help us manage our site as sustainably as possible; they’re a great way to engage with our community and raise awareness of the importance of biodiversity (even in urban environments); and since they are hands-on and fast-paced, they are also a lot of fun.

The way it works is there will be 2.5 hour shifts during which small groups of citizen scientists & UW students will go out with one of our field scientists in search of various taxa (birds, bats, bugs, fungi, plants, mammals, etc.). As a team, they try to ID and count what they find and record the location where they found it. In some cases (e.g. fungi, insects) specimens can be collected and identified later.

Space is limited, so click here to sign up for a shift today!

Don’t want to volunteer, but want to attend Paul Bannick’s presentation, The Life of Owls, on Friday evening? Non-volunteers can pay $8 to attend: click here to register

When: Friday, May 10th & Saturday May 11th

Friday:
4pm-6:30pm
6:30-8pm (dinner for volunteers & lecture from 7-8pm with wildlife photographer, Paul Bannick. Please register to attend the talk.)
8pm-10:30pm

Saturday:
7am-9:30am (early birders)
10am-12:30am
1pm-3:30pm
3:30-4pm (show & tell)

Where: Graham Visitors Center (2300 Arboretum Dr E Seattle WA)

mushroom sample

foster island phil1

bioblitz flyer

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WSDOT installing monitoring equipment in Union Bay Natural Area

April 8th, 2013 by UWBG Communication Staff

WSDOT_UBNA_monitoringBeginning as soon as the week of April 15, WSDOT will perform geotechnical investigations in the Union Bay Natural Area (UBNA). Crews will be taking soil samples and installing monitoring well equipment in and around the parking area to study soil and groundwater conditions. The information gathered helps us better understand the composition and characteristics of the ground in this area to prepare for future wetland mitigation work.

What can you expect?

  • Monitoring well installation will begin as soon as April 15, 2013, and last up to one week. The wells will be in place through summer 2014.
  • Work will occur on weekdays between 7 a.m.and 6 p.m.
  • The primary impact will be temporarily reduced parking (up to four spaces per well) during drilling and monitoring well installation.

More information: April 2013 SR520_UBNA_Fieldwork_Flyer

Call WA DOT at:
SR 520 Fieldwork Hotline: 206-708-4657
Web:
www.wsdot.wa.gov/projects/SR520Bridge/currentwork
Join the e-mail update list by sending a message to:
SR520Bridge@wsdot.wa.gov

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April Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

April 6th, 2013 by Pat Chinn-Sloan

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (April 1-15, 2013)

1) Azara dentata

  • Native to temperate and subtropical Chile.
  • Bears gold spring time flowers.
  • Located in the Pacific Connections Chilean Entry Garden.

2) Liriodendron chinense

  • A smaller Chinese version of the North American native tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera).
  • Known for its unique leaf shape and tulip-shaped flower.
  • Located in the Magnolia Collection.

3) Rehderodendron macrocarpum           

  • A small deciduous tree native to China.
  • Bears white spring flowers and kiwi-shaped fruits in the fall.
  • Several specimens located along Arboretum Drive and Azalea Way.

4) Viburnum carlesii

  • Native to Korea and Japan.
  • Bears clusters of 2-3″ fragrant white flowers.
  • Located in the Viburnum Collection.

5) Viburnum bitchiuense

  • Native to Korea and Japan.
  • Very similar to V. carlesii, possibly more heat tolerant.
  • Located in the Viburnum Collection.
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