Garden Design: Planning for Spring!

September 3rd, 2013 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Does the impending bleak weather have you feeling down? Sign up for one of our garden design classes to stay positive, and hopeful through the blah months! Learn about attracting wildlife to your yard or window, and making a safe and exciting garden for your little ones!

Wildlife Habitat Garden Design

Courtesy of Emily Bishton

Courtesy of Emily Bishton

 

Bring birds, butterflies, and bees to your yard! Learn the steps of choosing plants and features that fit your yard, and fulfill the daily needs of wildlife all the while keeping pests at bay. Whether your goal is to design a new garden or to incorporate new habitat features into an existing garden, you will enjoy this practical approach to sustainable success. Wildlife habitat gardens have kind of a beauty that plants alone cannot provide!

Bring photos of your own yard for personalized advice!

 

 

 

Child-Friendly Garden Design

Courtesy Emily Bishton

Courtesy Emily Bishton

 

 

Turn your garden into a safe and inviting place for kids. Learn to make unique places for nature exploration, and design the garden so that it “grows up” along with your child. Even learn how to involve your kids in food gardening.  Attendees should bring photos of their garden for personalized advice, and they will also receive lists of child-friendly plants and plants to avoid.

 

 

 

And as always, you can register online or call 206-685-8033 for more information

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Dutch Elm Disease in the Washington Park Arboretum

September 3rd, 2013 by UWBG Arborist, Chris Watson

Recent test results from Washington State University Puyallup Plant & Insect Diagnostic Laboratory confirmed the first case of Dutch Elm Disease (DED) in the core area of the Washington Park Arboretum.  The tree, a 45 year old Guernsey Elm (Ulmus minor ‘Sarniensis’), had been suffering from mechanical injury to the root crown and annual infestations of the Elm Leafminer, an insect that that feeds on elm leaves.  Over the past year, a significant portion of the tree began showing symptoms similar to DED.  Twig and branch samples from the tree showed dark staining in the cambium, which is a typical sign of DED.  The samples were sent to the WSU lab in Puyallup, which resulted in a positive diagnosis for DED.  The Guernsey Elm has been removed.

Management of Dutch Elm Disease will include frequent monitoring for signs and symptoms of the disease, sanitation pruning, prompt removal of severely infected trees, and root graft disruption when necessary.

For more information on Dutch Elm Disease, click here:

http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/pdf/sdot2dedbrochure.pdf

or here:

http://pnwhandbooks.org/plantdisease/elm-ulmus-spp-dutch-elm-disease

Ophiostoma picture

Dutch Elm Disease fungus (Ophiostoma sp.)
Photo courtesy of WSU Puyallup Plant & Insect Diagnostic Laboratory

Guernsey Elm (Ulmus minor ‘Sarniensis’)
Photo courtesy of University of Washington Botanic Gardens

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