UW Farm Stand – Just in time for Thanksgiving!

November 26th, 2013 by UWBG Communication Staff

uw farm logoStop by the UW farm stand this Wednesday for freshly harvested leeks, beets, carrots, greens, herbs, and more, perfect for a locally-grown Thanksgiving dinner.

10am to 3pm Wednesday, November 27

Center For Urban Horticulture – Merrill Commons

UW Farm Website
UW Farm on Facebook

 

cuh map

Merrill Commons is the greenhouse attached to Merrill Hall at the Center for Urban Horticulture

 

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Five Great Holiday Gift Ideas

November 21st, 2013 by Heidi Unruh, UWBG Communications Volunteer
Monoprint card by Roberta McDaris Long

Monoprint card by Roberta McDaris Long

The holidays are upon us, and we have many opportunities for unique gifts that will delight your friends and family, all while supporting a good cause!

Support local artisans at the Holiday Art, Craft and Gift Sale, December 6-21 at the Miller Library, where you’ll find:

  • Nature-inspired prints, cards and calendars by watercolor artist MOLLY HASHIMOTO
  • Woven textiles, scarves, and wraps by textile artist LINNEA DONNEN
  • Lovely handmade tiles by members of ARTISAN TILE NORTHWEST
  • Botanically-inspired ceramic mugs, bowls, and vases by KATIE MURPHY, UWBG alumna
  • Botanically themed monoprint cards by ROBERTA MCDARIS LONG, shown above*
  • Glass art by JOAN BAZAZ

Join us for the opening reception and sale Friday December 6 from 5-8pm. 25% of proceeds benefit the Miller Library.

For a truly unique, one-of-a-kind gift, consider a framed herbarium specimen, collected from our very own plants at the UW Botanic Garden. These professionally framed pressings artistically showcase beautiful plants in flower or in fruit. Proceeds directly support the Otis Douglas Hyde Herbarium.

Make a gift to the UW Botanic Gardens in someone’s name. You can give a general gift to the the Director’s Fund, or choose from nine different priority gift funds, such as Rare Plant Care and Conservation Fund or the Union Bay Natural Area Fund.

The UW Botanic Gardens offer a variety of education programs for everyone. Give the nature lovers in your life a gift certificate for one of our Public, Professional or Youth and Family classes. Contact Continuing Education at urbhort@uw.edu or 206-685-8033 to order.

Visit the Arboretum Gift Shop to find a delightful selection of gardening and outdoor books, plant-themed jewelry, natural body products, tools for green thumbs, and much more. Proceeds benefit the Washington Park Arboretum.

 

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“Wanna Touch the Sap with Me?” A Parent’s Perspective

November 18th, 2013 by Sarah Heller, Community Programs Coordinator & Fiddleheads Forest School Director

By guest blogger Karah Pino

“Wanna touch the sap with me?”

This is the question posed by my 3-year-old every Tuesday and Thursday morning when he gets to Fiddleheads Forest School in the Washington Park Arboretum. It is his first stop before each class and he excitedly invites me or anyone else who is around to join him. The sap he is investigating comes from an extraordinary source, just outside of Forest Grove, the preschool center. A tall ponderosa pine tree whose bark has bubbled and buckled from some kind of fungus beneath the surface creates constant streams of sap pouring down in a slow-moving waterfall from 20 feet up its trunk. The sap is moving so slowly we have found spider webs build in the crevices of the bark with a lone drip suspended in the silk.

I encourage Alvin to dust his hands in dirt before touching the sap to make it easier to remove later, but he doesn’t always remember. That’s ok with me, though, because the fragrant scent of pine sap reminds me of my own childhood in New Mexico, playing in the pine trees and junipers. It also reminds me of why I started looking for an outdoor preschool two years ago to give my son the opportunities I had to explore nature free from the ever-present boundaries and dangers of the urban environment we are surrounded by in so much of Seattle.

IMG_7995When I discovered that Fiddleheads was expanding to a full year preschool located in the middle of the Arboretum, I felt as if the universe had bent around to fulfill this dream! I knew it was perfect when I discovered that forest grove is just across from the ancient Sequoia grove I loved to visit as an undergrad at the University of Washington when I lived near the Arboretum. The colors of autumn have been incredible to view each week driving to the school and the wide variety of leaves, berries, nuts and seed pods seems unending. After drop off or before pick up, I make some time for myself to enjoy the smells, sounds, sights and sightings alongside my child, so we can share the magic of the of the forest together. (I’m sure I saw a coyote tail bouncing in the brush one day!)

Occasionally, I will hear the sounds of little voices adventuring along as I am on my own walk and feel their excitement and wonder well up inside of me. I love to watch from afar as they gather sticks to build a “fire” or leaves to pile up and roll in and I inwardly thank all the forces, voices and advocates who came together to create this fantastic program.

Although my favorite sequoia grove is protected by a fence now to protect the fragile roots, their giant trunks and strong presence are a perfect example of why the Arboretum is such a treasure for Seattlites of all ages and I hope there will be many more classes of preschoolers and homeschoolers and every other age of schoolers out in appreciation all year round in this wonderous place!

(Karah Pino, MAcOM is the delighted parent of a Fiddlehead’s Forest student, the social media coordinator for the Women of Wisdom Foundation and she manages the blog Unwind your Mind and Get Creative!

 

 

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November Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum (Part II)

November 18th, 2013 by Pat Chinn-Sloan
Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (November 12 - 25, 2013)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (November 12 – 25, 2013)

Got Greens?

1)   Fokienia hodginsii     (Fokienia)

  • Native to China, Vietnam, and Laos
  • Extremely slow growing outside of native range
  • Specimen located in Rhododendron Glen

2)   Keteleeria evelyniana     (Keteleeria)

  • Native to China, Vietnam, and Laos
  • Thrives in warm climates, but may be considered an “herbaceous perennial” in northern climates
  • Specimen located in north Pinetum area

3)   Taiwania cryptomerioides     (Coffin Tree)

  • Native to Taiwan, China, and Vietnam
  • Considered “critically threatened” in native range
  • Specimen located near East Newton Street entrance to the Pinetum area

4)   Thujopsis dolabrata     (Lizard Tree)

  • Native to Japan
  • Thrives in moist, shady areas with rich soil
  • Specimen located among Acer Collection in the Woodland Garden

5)   Torreya taxifolia     (Stinking Cedar)

  • Native to southeastern U.S. (Florida)
  • Very rare in native range due to a fungal pathogen
  • Specimen located between Loderi Valley and the Woodland Garden
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Slope Stability and Vegetative Soil Stabilization in the Puget Sound Region

November 15th, 2013 by Jessica Farmer, Adult Education Supervisor

The topography of the Puget Sound region presents construction and management challenges with hills, ravines, coastal bluffs and shorelines that can be subject to erosion and landslides in our rainy winter weather. This issue creates safety concerns, transit and travel nightmares, permitting complexity, and questions about how to best design and construct in steep landscapes.

Land managers, planners, engineers, landscape architects and others need to know the most current information about how water and geology interact, why the land moves, and what can be done to reduce erosion and promote stability. This intermediate-level symposium offers an in-depth look at the hydrology and geology of our region, and the tools and techniques available to allow for successful slope stabilization.

Eroded slope in Washington state.=

Photo courtesy of Washington State Department of Transportation

Thursday, December 5, 2013
8:15 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
University of Washington Botanic Gardens
Center for Urban Horticulture
3501 NE 41st St, Seattle, WA 98105

Cost:
$125 per person. Lunch is included.
($150 after November 21)

Contact:
urbhort@uw.edu or 206-685-8033.

Register:
https://www.cfr.washington.edu/uwbg/

Who should attend: Professionals working with shoreline property, ravines, and other topographically-challenged sites in the fields of engineering, planning, landscape design and construction, horticulture, landscape architecture, ecological restoration, consulting, arboriculture, and other land-management specialties.

Speakers include:

  • Bill Laprade, Senior Vice President at Shannon & Wilson, Inc. on Geology & Hydrology of Puget Sound.
  • Elliott Menashe, Natural resource manager & consultant, Greenbelt Consulting, on Vegetation, Erosion, and Slope Stability: role and benefits of vegetation; and Bio-Structural Engineering for Erosion Control and Slope Stabilization.
  • Dr. Stan Boyle, Vice President at Shannon & Wilson, Inc., on Geosynthetics for Erosion Control and Reinforcement.
  • Rob McIntosh and Seth Amrhein, City of Seattle Department of Planning and Development, on permitting and regulations on steep slopes.
  • Joe Burcar, Senior Shoreline Planner, Washington Department of Ecology, on critical areas and shoreline regulations related to Geologically Hazardous Areas, steep slopes.
  • Nicholas Dankers, ISA Certified Arborist and Qualified Tree Risk Assessor, on Conifer Care Guidelines related to trees on slopes.

Professional CEU’s have been approved for CPH, PLANET, and ASCA. APLD and ISA credits are being pursued. View the seminar webpage for updates.

 

Draft Seminar Schedule_Updated_11_26

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Master Pruner Series

November 13th, 2013 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

PruningComing this winter to the University of Washington Botanic Gardens is the Master Pruner Series, held in cooperation with PlantAmnesty. This 12-course series will highlight techniques and tools for quality pruning from a number of professional instructors.

Register online or call 206-685-8033.

Master Pruner 2014 Flyer

 

 

 

 

MasterPruner2014Flyer

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A Glimpse into the Past – Azalea Way before the Azaleas

November 7th, 2013 by UWBG Communication Staff

By John A. Wott, Director Emeritus

photo

Grading Azalea Way in the Washington Park Arboretum circa 1938

Seventy-five years ago, work was beginning on the creation of the “University of Washington Arboretum” in Washington Park, as the Dawson/Olmsted plan had been accepted.   This month’s photo was taken by Frederick Leissler, landscape architect for the Seattle Parks Department, labeled as 1938-39.  It shows the grading to create Azalea Way.   Leissler actually developed the first preliminary sketches in 1934 for a comprehensive plan of the Arboretum, but the sketches were not accepted.

Scot Medbury, in preparation for his M.S. thesis (The Olmsted Taxonomic Arboretum and its Application to Washington Park, Seattle; 1990) interviewed Leissler shortly before the landscape architect’s death. Copies of Leissler’s archives are available in the Miller Library.   The Leissler plan, along with several others including one by Otto Holmdahl, were not accepted.  The accepted plan was funded with a $3000 gift from the Seattle Garden Club, which hired James Dawson of the Olmsted Brothers firm.

Leissler wrote the description on the back of the photo, giving the details, “In the Grading of ‘Azalea Way’, over 50,000 cu. yds. of dirt was moved and several thousand cu. yds. of cow manure and peat moss worked into the soil”.  (signed Fred Leissler, Asst. Dir.)   This was no small feat back in 1938.

photo

Described by Leissler: “In the Grading of ‘Azalea Way’, over 50,000 cu. yds. of dirt was moved and several thousand cu. yds. of cow manure and peat moss worked into the soil”

As we meander along the three-quarter mile path today, we are indebted to those persons of vision who created one of the world’s most magnificent grass public walkways.  I am reminded of a warm July afternoon in the mid-1990s, when members of the Board of Directors from the Huntington Botanical Garden practically all lay prone in the middle of Azalea Way, in awe of this green oasis bordered by statuesque Northwest conifers. Today thousands of Northwest residents and visitors make this a regular walk.  The next time you walk Azalea Way, why not wonder what those creators might be saying if they “walked beside you today!”  Do it soon!

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November 2013 Plant Profile: Camellia sasanqua ‘Setsugekka’

November 4th, 2013 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes

Camellia 2After a tremendous autumn display, the show continues in the landscape with wonderful fall and winter blooming plants that take center stage. This lovely selection of the fall/winter blooming Camellia sasanqua is highly coveted by garden designers for its glossy, dark green, evergreen foliage and simple flowers that do not leave a horrible mess once they’re through flowering.

‘Setsugekka’ has lovely pure white flowers with stunning yellow stamens that begin blooming in late October. It has a soft, earthy scent to its flowers and it has somewhat of a free and open habit that lends itself to being trained up against a wall as an espalier that provides a dark green background to others plants during the spring and summer months when its not blooming.

Camellia 1

Common Name: Fall-Blooming Camellia
Location: Fragrance Garden/NHS Hall Bed
Origin: Garden Origin
Height and Spread: 10-15′ high x 7′ wide
Bloom Time: October-February

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November Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

November 3rd, 2013 by Pat Chinn-Sloan
Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (October 28, 2013 - November 11, 2013)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (October 28, 2013 – November 11, 2013)

1)  Arbutus unedo   (Strawberry Tree)

  • One of the many species described by Carl Linnaeus in his 1753 landmark work, Species Plantarum.
  • An amazing plant with 4-season interest, including fruits and flowers at the same time.
  • Serves as a bee plant for honey production and the fruits are food for birds.

2)  Camellia wabisuki   (Wabisuki Camellia)

  • A Sukiya variety with single, pinkish-white flowers and an open growth habit.
  • A 70-year-old specimen heralds the magnificent seasonal display in the Witt Winter Garden.
  • The flowers of Wabisuki are often used in decorations for Japanese tea ceremonies.

3)  Drimys winterii   (Winter’s Bark or Canelo)

  • A slender tree growing to 60’ feet and native to the temperate rain forests of Chile.
  • For centuries, Winter’s Bark was esteemed as a preventative remedy for scurvy before vitamin C was isolated.
  • Grown as an ornamental plant for its reddish-brown bark, and clusters of creamy white jasmine-scented flowers.

4)  Franklinia alatamaha   (Franklin Tree)

  • The sole species in this genus, commonly called the Franklin Tree.
  • Commercially available for garden cultivation and prized for its fragrant white flowers
  • Botanist, William Bartram named this elegant tree in honor of his father’s friend, Benjamin Franklin.

5)  Rhododendron occidentale   (Western Azalea)

  • There is considerable diversity in form and appearance of this species.
  • Tolerant of serpentine soils, it is part of the unique plant community found in the Siskiyou Mountains.
  • The Western Azalea was an early contributor in the development of hybrid azaleas.
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