NHS Spring Plant Sale – March 7

February 28th, 2014 by Heidi Unruh, UWBG Communications Volunteer

1912242_712998182064027_770195739_nJoin us for the Spring Ephemeral Plant Sale on March 7 with selections from  more than 20 local nurseries. Dan Hinkley will present a special lecture, “Favorite Vignettes of Spring:  Noteworthy Plant Combinations for the Pacific Northwest.” Tickets to the lecture ($5) go on sale at 8:30 am.

The sale runs from 9am – 3pm at the Center for Urban Horticulture. Proceeds from the sale benefit the Elisabeth C. Miller Library.



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2014 Urban Forest Symposium

February 24th, 2014 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Announcing the 6th Annual Urban Forest Symposium! Registration is now open for this year’s symposium, focusing on Climate Change and the Urban Forest.

Learn about the climatic changes our region can expect and strategies that can be used to plan and manage for a healthy and resilient urban forest. Presenters will discuss the expected changes to the climate, urban forest responses, and what urban foresters and advocates can do to prepare. Presentations will be relevant to urban foresters, landscape professionals, restoration ecologists, tree care professionals, consulting arborists, sustainability professionals, urban planners, landscape designers, landscape architects, municipal managers, and tree advocates.

Professional credits will be available.

Date: Wednesday, May 28, from 9am-4:30pm
Location: UW Botanic Gardens – Center for Urban Horticulture, NHS Hall
3501 NE 41st St, Seattle, WA 98105
Cost: $75 per person. Lunches available for $15.

Registration now open.

Contact: urbhort@uw.edu or 206-685-8033

Presenters include:

Greg McPhersonResearch Forester, Urban Ecosystems and Social Dynamics – Pacific Southwest Research Station, USDA Forest Service
Jim Robbins, journalist and author of The Man Who Planted Trees
Nick Bond, Washington State Climatologist and Principal Research Scientist for the UW Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean
Nancy Rottle, RLA, ASLA, Associate Professor at University of Washington and founding Director of the UW Green Futures Research and Design Lab
Tom Hinckley, Professor Emeritus, University of Washington School of Environmental and Forest Sciences
Drew Zwart, Ph.D. Plant Pathology and Physiology, Bartlett Tree Experts
Municipal representatives discussing urban forest strategies for climate change adaptation
Link to more information.

Fraxinus_pennsylvanica_'Marshalls_Seedless'

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February Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum (Part II)

February 23rd, 2014 by Pat Chinn-Sloan


“Spring Buds”


Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (February 17 - March 2, 2014)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum             (February 17 – March 2, 2014)


1)   Acer monspessulanum var. turcomanicum
Montpelier maple

  • An elegant, compact tree reaching 23-33 feet tall.
  • Suitable for warm climates and adapted to calcareous and stony soils.
  • A mature individual is growing in the Mediterranean bed along Arboretum Drive.

2)   Magnolia kobus                Kobushi Magnolia

  • Blooms in early spring and bears pleasantly fragrant white flowers.
  • Native to Japan and cultivated in temperate climates.
  • A lovely, large specimen sits in the Arboretum Magnolia Collection.

3)   Rhodondendron ‘Directeur Moerlands’
Azalea ‘Directeur Moerlands’

  • Derived from crosses between Japanese azaleas and Chinese azaleas.
  • Known for their excellent fall color and unsurpassed springs flowers.
  • Azalea Way is loaded with beautiful azaleas just ready to explode for spring.

4)   Ribes sanguineum ‘Henry Henneman’           Henry Henneman Winter Currant

  • Studded with a cap-burst of color at a botanically bereft time of year.
  • Easy to grow, well-mannered and amenable to pruning.
  • The Cascadian Entry Garden boast several cultivars of this wonderful, early blooming shrub.

5)   Sambucus racemosa              Red Elderberry

  • Grows in riparian environments, woodlands and in generally moist areas.
  • Many parts of the plant are poisonous and have been used as an emetic.
  • Native to the Pacific Northwest, elderberry bushes dot the Arboretum. Birds love the seeds.
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Campus Wedding and Special Events Fair Feb 23, 2014

February 14th, 2014 by UWBG Communication Staff
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The University of Washington Club set for a festive event.

You are invited to an exhibition of campus venues for weddings and other special events!

Sunday, February 23, 2014
12:00 pm ~ 3:00 pm

Reservations are required uwclub@uw.edu or(206) 543-0437

Meet with representatives from UW Events services, UW Botanic Gardens, The Burke Museum, The University of Washington Club, and many more!

UW Club Members, UW Faculty, Staff, and their guests are complimentary.

The University of Washington Club will be arranged for a reception to give guests a taste of what the Club offers for private events, with examples of decorations for every season. Staff from campus venues and various local wedding resources will be on hand to provide information and answer  questions about their offerings.

No weddings in your near future? No worries! This reception is the perfect opportunity to connect with local vendors and sample their wares for any kind of special event ~ anniversaries, birthdays, receptions & ceremonies of all sorts! If it’s special to you ~ we’ll make the experience unforgettable!
Come enjoy the stunning view and fun atmosphere of the UW Club, as well as complimentary appetizers and beverages!

Some of the featured vendors will include :
AA Party Rentals, Fena Flowers, Seattle’s Best Chair Covers, Mobile Celebrations, Swink Style Bar,  Planning Savvy, UW Events Services … and, of course, the exceptional catering team from The University of Washington Club!

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February Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

February 6th, 2014 by Pat Chinn-Sloan
Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (February 3 - 16, 2014)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum             (February 3 – 16, 2014)

1) Chimonanthus praecox  Wintersweet

  • With exceedingly fragrant yellow flowers borne on the bare shoots in winter, C. praecox has a suitable home here within the Witt Winter Garden.
  • Chimonanthus is the Chinese counterpart of the North American genus, Calycanthus.

2)  Lonicera standishii Winter Honeysuckle

  • A native of China, L. standishii is a perennial favorite because of its charming fragrance.
  • This specimen can be found in the Witt Winter Garden.

3)  Pieris japonica ‘Valentine’s Day’

  • Known commonly as ‘Lily of the Valley’, P. japonica is an evergreen shrub of low habit. The clustered panicles of this particular cultivar are a dark, dusky red color, giving it plenty of mid-winter attraction.
  • Located near the south end of the Lilac Collection along Azalea Way.

4)  Prunus x subhirtella ‘Rosea’

  • Native to Japan, this relatively small flowering cherry has begun to show us its rose-pink blossoms.
  • Several specimens can be found throughout the Arboretum, including one along the trail that leads from here to the Winter Garden.

5)  Viburnum specimens

  • V. farreri ‘Candidissimum’
  • V. foetens
  • V. x bodnantense ‘Deben’
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A glimpse into the past – Rhododendron Glen before the canopy filled in

February 6th, 2014 by UWBG Communication Staff

By John A. Wott, Director Emeritus

Today it is difficult to find much open space when you walk about the Washington Park Arboretum. Often you have trouble seeing the sky. I have often heard visitors remark, “How I love the Arboretum, it never changes, only seasonally.” Several years ago, I had a gentleman tell me that he drove through the Arboretum daily and it had not changed a bit in 25years. It is interesting how subtly plants go up and around us, without us realizing it – that is, until we need to prune or remove them.   Plants, particularly conifers, in the Northwest can grow almost every day of the year, anytime the temperature is above 40 degrees F. No wonder we have such large conifers!

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View east from Interlaken boulevard toward Rhododendron Glen 7-16-1948

This is a picture taken July 16, 1948, soon after the Washington Park Arboretum officially began. It was taken from the lower part of East Interlaken Boulevard looking east across Lake Washington Boulevard. In the center is Rhododendron Glen. Look at the sparseness of trees and shrubs and you can actually see the “Glen” from East Interlaken Boulevard. You can also see the small meandering stream coming down the hillside and the small pond along Azalea Way.

Today the curatorial and maintenance staffs need to manage the growth of the plants, the collections and the native matrix (native trees that are not accessioned). It is a challenge to allow enough space for plants to grow to their intended size and shape. They make decisions on pruning and removal on a daily basis. The decisions they make enable us to enjoy the true beauty of each plant as well as the beauty of the panorama.

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Introducing our new look!

February 4th, 2014 by UWBG Communication Staff

Much like our varied and extensive collection of woody and herbaceous plants, our organization has evolved and grown over time. Throughout this growth, we have always striven to enrich the lives of students and the public through our education programs, outstanding collections and natural areas. Our two locations, the Center for Urban Horticulture and the Washington Park Arboretum, remain treasured destinations that provide an urban escape, accessible and free, in the heart of Seattle.

UW Botanic Gardens logo cone

With that in mind, we’re very pleased to share with you the latest evolution of our logo. Come grow with us.

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About the logo…

THE CONE: Inspired by our native Shore Pine (Pinus contorta), the cone represents our collection and the importance of conifers in our landscape. It holds the seeds that symbolize our commitment to a future where plants & people thrive together.

THE COLORS: Purple & gold to underscore our place within the University of Washington family; we are an integral part of the UW’s School of Environmental & Forest Sciences and serve as a “front porch” where academia mingles with the general public.

THE LOOK: As leaders in the fields of horticulture, environmental restoration and conservation, we are here to share the latest research and expertise with our diverse community of learners. We wanted a look that was professional yet approachable, and recognizable throughout our campus sites and facilities.

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Step Outside This Summer

February 4th, 2014 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Summer Camp at the Washington Park Arboretum is starting its fourth year with more weeks and themes than ever. Kids from 6-12 years can go on weekly adventures featuring bugs, birds, frogs, trees, weeds, and even an art and cooking show.

Learn more about the 2014 Summer Camp at the UW Botanic Gardens!

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February 2014 Plant Profile: Helleborus x ballardiae Gold Collection® Merlin

February 4th, 2014 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes

Helleborus x MerlinHellebores are very popular winter-blooming perennials, and plant breeders are responding to the high demand for easy maintenance and colorful blooms during the gloomiest time of the year. The Gold Collection® is an assortment of species and modern hybrids selected for vigorous growth and prolific blossoms year after year. ‘Merlin,’ a Ballardiae hybrids (H. niger x H. lividus), is simply magical: it opens as a soft pink with a deeper pink reverse and a hint of lime green. As the flower ages, the blooms age to a richer deep pink and hold on for many weeks. The foliage on ‘Merlin’ is exquisite, with a hint of marbled variegation on tough, clean leaves.

 

Skagit Gardens in Mt. Vernon, WA kindly donated a batch of Helleborus x ballardiae Gold Collection® ‘Merlin’ to UW Botanic Gardens,  and the plants have done well for us. They’re exceptional in the garden, but also in containers for those who don’t have much space. Helleborus x Merlin 2

 

 

 

 

 

Common Name: Hellebore hybrid
Location: Entry Triangle Bed Entry along NE 41st St.
Origin: Garden Origin.
Height and Spread: 10-12″ high x 18″ wide
Bloom/Fruit Time: December-March

 

Helleborus x Merlin Habit

 

 

 

 

 

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Take A Tour!

February 3rd, 2014 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Get out and stretch your legs this spring! The UW Botanic Gardens are going to some familiar and not-so-familiar places this spring. Explore a new garden, and maybe even get some ideas for your own yard!

Winter Garden pics 013

 

 

 

Coming up soon is our first Wednesday Walk with John Wott. Dr. John Wott, Professor Emeritus and former Arboretum Director will lead a walking tour and share insights on the history, design, and changes over time of the Washington Park Arboretum. This tour is also well-suited to visitors with limited mobility. This season’s tour will be of the Witt Winter Garden, which will be in full bloom!

 

 

 

 

Courtesy of the Miller Garden

 

 

Our next adventure takes us to the Elisabeth C. Miller Botanical Garden, located in the Highland community. This garden has a very limited amount of visitors each year, so this may be your only chance to see this Northwest treasure! The curator, Richie Steffan, will show us how the Miller Garden uses early flowering bulbs and perennials to create a delightful and vibrant spring garden.

 

 

 

trillium

 

 

 

 

Have spring ephemerals caught your attention this year? Come visit the Cottage Lake Gardens in Woodinville to immerse yourself in one of the most famous, the trilliums! We will be having an elegant tea, followed by a talk and a tour of the gardens, which features all 48 species of trillium.

 

 

 

 

 

 

In addition, we always offer our Free Weekend Walks every Sunday, starting at 1pm, and meeting at the Graham Visitors Center at the Washington Park Arboretum.

You can register online for any or all of these lovely tours, or call 206-685-8033.

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