May Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum
(Part III)

May 29th, 2014 by UWBG Horticulturist

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (May 27 - June 8, 2014)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum     (May 27 – June 8, 2014)

1)    Crataegus crus-galli        Cockspur Hawthorn

  • Native to eastern North America, this small deciduous tree has a pleasant habit and is now showing off its small white flowers, but don’t get too close!  The rigid thorns can be up to three inches long.
  • Hawthorns are classified within the plant family Rosaceae, and are allied to Cotoneaster, Mespilus, and Pyracantha.
  • This specimen is located on the east side of Lake Washington Boulevard, just north of the Boyer Parking Lot.

2)   Deutzia x hybrida        ‘Magicien’

  • Named after Johann van der Deutz, a friend of Thunberg in 18th century Amsterdam, Deutzia contains some of the most beautiful shrubs currently in flower.  It is a member of the family Hydrangeaceae.
  • This specimen is located near the east side of our field nursery, along the Broadmoor fence.

3)   Kalmia latifolia        Mountain Laurel

  • Native to eastern North America, Kalmias are a small group of shrubs within the family Ericaceae.  They were named by Linnaeus in honor of Peter Kalm, one of his pupils.  The Arnold Arboretum near Boston boasts a great hedge of K. latifolia that are over 200 yards long.
  • These cuttings were taken from specimens on Arboretum Drive near the Woodland Garden.

4)   Ostrya carpinifolia        European Hop Hornbeam

  • A member of the family Betulaceae, the genus Ostrya contains about ten closely related species native to various parts of the northern hemisphere.  O. carpinifolia is native to southern Europe.  Female catkins develop into hop-like fruits in the summer.
  • This specimen is located within our Hornbeam Collection near the terminus of Foster Island Road.

5)   Viburnum dilatatum        Linden Viburnum

  • An upright, deciduous shrub native to Japan and China, V. dilatatum is displaying its small flowers borne in domed, terminal corymbs, similar to those of ‘lacecap’ hydrangeas.
  • This cutting was taken from a specimen within our Viburnum Collection, just west of the “True Ashes”.
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