DIY Wetlands In a Bottle

July 8th, 2016 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

BottleWetlandJoelBidnickWetlands rely on the right balance of invertebrates, plants, water, and nutrients to stay healthy. In this class you will learn about plants and animals living in our nearby wetlands, and you will build your very own mini-ecosystem for your living room or office. Learn to care for your bottle so that it thrives month after month. Watch your community of plants, zooplankton, and detritovores evolve everyday. Bring your own bottle, and we’ll supply the rest of the materials.

What: Make your own wetlands in a bottle class

When:  Tuesday, August 9, 2016, 7 – 8:30pm

WhereCenter for Urban Horticulture, Douglas Classroom (3501 NE 41st St
Seattle, WA 98105)

Cost: $30

HowRegister Online, or by phone (206-685-8033)

Photo by instructor Joel Bidnick

Tour a Lavender Farm

June 7th, 2016 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Lavender2_woodinvillelavenderJoin Master Gardener Tom Frei for a talk and tour at the Woodinville Lavender Farm. Summer is the best time to view (and take in the scent) of lavender blooms!

Tom has been working with his wife and children to develop Woodinville Lavender since 2008. They are currently growing over 3000 plants and 25 varieties. Tom will discuss the history, botany, selection, care, and uses of lavender and lead us on a tour of the gardens. Lavender refreshments will be provided!

Afterwards, feel free to enjoy the gardens on your own, and don’t forget to stop in the shop where you can find all things lavender related!

What: Talk and Tour of Woodinville Lavender

When: Thursday, June 30, 1-2:30pm

Where: Woodinville Lavender, 14223 Woodinville Redmond Rd NW, Redmond, WA (about a 30 minute drive from Seattle)

Cost: $25/person

Register:  Online or by phone (206-685-8033)

Photos Courtesy of Woodinville Lavender

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Tom, harvesting a bunch of lavender

Meet our Summer Camp Staff!

June 6th, 2016 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

StephanieAragonStephanie Aragon, Preschool Garden Guide

Stephanie is an Environmental Educator, born and raised in the Pacific Northwest. Her background is in Anthropology and Environmental Studies, looking at how humans and the environment interact. When Stephanie is not leading summer camp, she presents engaging programs and experiences at the Woodland Park Zoo, focusing on environmental education and inspiring conservation action. During the school year she explores the natural world with students as a teacher at the Fiddleheads Forest School. Her interests spotlight education and community involvement, used as pillars to support healthy people, environments, and communities. She loves fresh berries, and the thrill that you feel when you positively identify something new for the first time. Stephanie approaches environmental education with a sense of wonder and excitement; she can’t wait to join you on adventures that foster our fundamental appreciation for the natural world.


 

RobynBoothby

 

Robyn Boothby, Garden Guide

Robyn has taught Environmental Education at IslandWood, an outdoor education center on Bainbridge Island, as well as Science at a high school in Texas. She is currently teaching at The Perkins School in North Seattle. She has a Masters of Education through the University of Washington and a BS in Engineering. When she is not teaching, Robyn enjoys reading until she is forced to go to bed, smelling flowers, lifting weights, and dancing around her room.

 

 


DaveGifford

 

 

Dave Gifford, Summer Camp Coordinator

Dave is thrilled to be returning for his third summer at the Arboretum. Dave has taught at a number of environmental education and school programs throughout Seattle including Islandwood and most recently Bryant Elementary. He holds a Master’s in Science Education from UW and a Fine Arts degree from Syracuse University. Dave loves hiking, mushroom-hunting, birding, and all the natural wonders of the Northwest.

 

 


Katy Jach, Garden GuideKatyJach

Katy has worked at both the Yakima and Seattle Arboretums and is very excited to be returning for her second summer here in Seattle!  She grew up east of the Cascades in Yakima, Washington. She enjoys hiking, rafting, swimming, and just about any activity where she can be outside! She will be graduating from the University of Washington this coming Fall with a Bachelor of Arts in Spanish and a minor in Education. She was a Peer Teaching Assistant for a Natural History course within the Program on the Environment during the Spring and plans to become a teacher after she graduates.

 


 

MorganLawlessMorgan Lawless, Garden Guide

Born and raised in Syracuse, Morgan went to the University of New England in Southern Maine and stayed in New England several years after graduation. She has worked outdoor education through a program called Nature’s Classroom. Teaching outside is the reason she decided to go to Islandwood and get her Master’s in Education. She is excited about working at the Arboretum this summer! Morgan really enjoys spending time outside near any body of water.  She loves looking for creatures that live in the water. She also likes hiking and reading.

 


CaseyOKeefeCasey O’Keefe, Garden Guide

Casey is a Senior at University of Washington and studies ecology, evolution, and conservation biology. During the school year she is a garden guide for Saplings field trip programs, and this is her second year of summer camps at the arboretum. She previously taught summer camps at Pacific Science Center. Casey has experience volunteering with Mountains to Sound Greenway and does undergraduate research at a UW paleobiology lab. She is so excited to share her appreciation of nature and wildlife during camps this summer!

 


 

LiseRamaleyLise Ramaley, Preschool Garden Guide & Aftercare

Although she is a true Seattle native who adores the rain and never turns down a mountainous hike, Lise currently goes to St. Olaf College in Minnesota. Going into her junior year, Lise is studying Sociology, Anthropology, and Environmental Studies. She began doing trail work five years ago with the Student Conservation Association, which led her to a love for the outdoors and environmentalism, as well as an interest in understanding the ways in which we interact with nature. When she’s not exploring outside, Lise spends her time playing ultimate frisbee and jazz bass (not at the same time). She cannot wait to explore the Arboretum this summer and spread her excitement for the wonders of nature!


AnyaRifkinAnya Rifkin, Preschool Garden Guide

Anya has lived in Seattle for two years and couldn’t be happier calling the Pacific Northwest home. Having a passion to teach children, Anya received a degree in Elementary Education with a concentration in Environmental Studies from the University of Vermont. During the school year, Anya is a teacher at Open Window School in Bellevue. Outside of teaching, you can find her hiking, kayaking, or doing puzzles.

 

 


SarahRogersSarah Rogers, Preschool Garden Guide & Aftercare

Born and raised in Ballard, Sarah grew up playing at Seattle’s local parks and beaches. She studied geology at Northern Arizona University, where she also fell in love with birding and natural history. She did a Student Conservation Association internship in interpretation at Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park during the summer of 2014, leading Junior Ranger and Ranger Cub programs, which changed her trajectory to environmental education. That fall she began working as an interpreter at the Pacific Science Center, and the following summer did another SCA internship in Coldfoot, AK, at the Arctic Interagency Visitor Center. She now works as an educator at the Pacific Science Center’s outreach education program, Science On Wheels, and as a naturalist for the University of Washington Botanic Gardens. In her free time she enjoys climbing, doodling, and exploring the beautiful world we live in.


 

 

 

 

Plants, Predators, and Food Webs

June 3rd, 2016 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant
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How could this pollinator be affected by a predator consuming a herbivore?

What is a food web and and how does each part interact? Ecological relationships between plants and animals can be complex. Plants produce food for many animals, forming the basis for food chains and shaping a community. Herbivores consume plants and have evolved special adaptations for digesting them. Herbivores can influence plants directly, through consumption, but plants can also experience ‘indirect effects’ through predators who control the herbivores. For example, wolf re-introduction in Yellowstone has increased willow tree growth by controlling the elk that eat them. Plant pollinators can also be affected by predators, indirectly benefiting plant reproduction and survival.  We will explore how plants can be affected by predators of herbivores in the food chain and explore trophic cascades.

Cost: Free! Optional $5 donation at the door supports our education programs
Please RSVP online, by phone (206-685-8033) or email (urbhort@uw.edu)

Instructor Leeanna Pletcher is an Assistant in the Saplings Education Program at University of Washington Botanical Gardens where she teaches elementary school groups about forests, wetlands, and ecology through hands-on activities, games and observation. She has taught biology as an Adjunct Instructor at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia. Her research interest is Ecology.

How do wolves, willow and elk interact?

How do wolves, willow and elk interact?

Another Successful BioBlitz!

May 27th, 2016 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

By Alicia Blood, Youth and Family Programs Supervisor

It’s hard to believe it has been 3 weeks since UW Botanic Gardens staff, taxa experts and community volunteers joined forces in our 2016 BioBlitz.  It was an amazing weekend full of sunshine, teamwork, and exploration. The Washington Park Arboretum, and Foster Island in particular, was abuzz with the opening day of boating season festivities, but that didn’t stop our dedicated crew! In all, we had over 86 people take part in our weekend BioBlitz events, including an entire University of Washington Entomology class.  Here are some of the highlights from the weekend:

DSC_0346smallWe started our weekend with an introduction to a BioBlitz for families on Friday evening. Participating families explored what a scientist does during a BioBlitz through a variety of hands-on stations. Children participated in a variety of activities which showed them how to think and act like a scientist, including creating a plant field guide and observing aquatic macroinvertebrates. In addition, families had the opportunity to join in on a few guided group hikes to find birds and pond life. We had a great time practicing our skills and learning about what a BioBlitz is. In fact, a few families returned the following day to put their new skills into action in one of our taxa groups!

BatsFriday evening kicked off our first official taxa group – bats! Michelle Noe from Bats Northwest brought a crew out to collect acoustic data, allowing us to listen to bat calls. Our experts then used the data collected to reveal that there were 5 different species of bats on Foster Island that night!   We also led a group of families on a bat focused night hike where they learned about bats, played a few bat games and had the opportunity to see bats flying overhead.

DSC_0426After a quick night’s sleep, we returned early Saturday morning to start off our day with our birds taxa group at dawn. This group of dedicated volunteers arrived bright and early (with children in tow) to beat the Boating Day foot traffic on Foster Island. With the sun recently risen, they headed out to the northern-most point of the island to begin their observations. Surrounded by springtime bird behaviors, this group had the opportunity to clearly view the Bald Eagle’s nest, stand by while a marsh wren went about its job protecting its nest, observe a Virginia Rail, and see many baby birds and ducklings.

While our birds group was out exploring Foster Island, volunteers were arriving at the Graham Visitors Center and gearing up to head out in our morning taxa groups. Teams assembled to collect data on lichens, bryophytes, noxious weeds and insects. Included in this group were college students enrolled in an entomology course at the University of Washington taught by Dr. Patrick Tobin, who added great energy to the morning. Teams spread out across Foster Island and went to work finding 16 species of bryophytes, 21 lichens, 25 noxious weeds, and a lot of insects! The noxious weed group found an interesting specimen. While the ID has yet to be verified, we think it might be Lonicera maackii or Amur honeysuckle, an invasive plant native to the NE United States.

DSC_0495smallOur final groups, arrived in the afternoon, eager to take a look at our plant collections as well as explore the waters of Foster Island in search of aquatic macroinvertebrates and mussels. Team Water headed all the way out to the furthest point on Foster Island and got right in the water to examine who was enjoying life in Lake Washington. Their investigation was highlighted by an abundance of sunshine and the festive Opening Day of Boating Season Boat Parade (I heard they got to sing along to the Love Boat song 6 times)!  Meanwhile, Team Plant was out checking plant collections on Foster Island, noting tree sizes, condition and tracking any trees that were not recorded on our 20 year old maps. Through these observations they noted an extreme increase of native species along the edges of Lake Washington.

DSC_0461 (2)When the day was over, our basecamp was packed up and our volunteers and taxa experts had departed, we had a moment to reflect on our accomplishments. With a wild Boating Day weekend on Foster Island, we were sure we would run into some challenges, but in the end everything seemed to run along as smooth as can be. We had 86 people participate in our weekend BioBlitz including many young and eager future scientists! Staff had a blast working alongside experts and volunteers and especially enjoyed sharing the wonders of nature at the Arboretum. With BioBlitz 2016 barely in the past we are now looking forward to our next event – stay tuned for fall 2017.  In the meantime, make sure to check out our data here, and don’t forget to make time to come out and explore the UW Botanic Gardens!

DSCN0663A BioBlitz is an intense period of biological surveying in an attempt to record all the living species within a designated area. Groups of scientists, naturalists and community volunteers conduct an intensive field study over a continuous time period. The University of Washington Botanic Gardens has completed four BioBlitzes at the Washington Park Arboretum over the last six years.

 

 

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2016 Bioblitz

April 15th, 2016 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant
Jenni Cena and Liam Stacey, guest entomologists, examine a catch at our 2013 Bioblitz

Jenni Cena and Liam Stacey, guest entomologists, examine a catch at our 2013 Bioblitz

Coming up on May 6 and 7, the UW Botanic Gardens invites you to join our 2016 BioBlitz at the Washington Park Arboretum! A BioBlitz is an intense period of biological surveying in an attempt to record all the living species within a designated area. Groups of scientists, naturalists and community volunteers conduct an intensive field study over a continuous time period. Sign up this year and help us look for bats, birds, insects, lichens, weeds, and mussels at the Arboretum’s Foster Island!

On Friday night, you can partake in “Introduction to BioBlitz” activities, as well as walks with our naturalists for families with kids ages 4 to 11. Stop in any time between 4 and 7 p.m., and we will also stay out late to look for bats from 8 to 10 p.m.

On Saturday, we’ll be searching for birds at daybreak, insects, lichens and noxious weeds in the morning, then plants and freshwater mussels/macroinvertebrates in the afternoon. The BioBlitz is open to everyone, whether you are a newbie or a seasoned naturalist, and children are welcome in all groups.

So if you’d like to join other students, citizen scientists and families for a rewarding, hands-on weekend of discovery, you can RSVP online for an organism group (or taxa), by phone (206.685.8033), or by email (uwbgeduc@uw.edu).

Hope you can make it!Andrew_Westphal_by_Christina_Doherty

2016 Urban Forest Symposium

April 8th, 2016 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

UrbanForestSymposium2016Explosive population growth is underway in the Puget Sound Region. The 2016 Urban Forest Symposium will explore approaches to sustaining the urban forest in the face of this rapid densification. Speakers will introduce the tenets of Smart Growth initiatives which have been widely adopted by policy makers, influencing land use decisions and the urban forest in Seattle and around the world. Case studies of successful approaches from Seattle and other cities will offer insights into ways to creatively address our local challenges.

Speakers include:

  • David B. Williams, freelance writer and naturalist. Author of Too High and Too Steep, and The Seattle Street-Smart Naturalist
  • John McNeil, past Manager of Forestry Services, Oakville, Ontario
  • Laurie Reid, Urban Forestry Supervisor, Charlotte, North Carolina
  • Shelley Bolser, Land Use Planning Supervisor, Seattle Department of Construction & Inspections
  • Roger Valdez, Director, Smart Growth Seattle
  • Shane DeWald, Senior Landscape Architect, Seattle Department of Transportation
  • Cass Turnbull, Founder of PlantAmnesty
  • Peg Staeheli, FASLA, PLA, LEED AP, MIG/SvR Design Company

What: 2016 Urban Forest Symposium

Who: Urban foresters, planners, policymakers, landscape architects, garden designers, landscape contractors, advocates, volunteers, restoration companies and organizations, project managers and landscape maintenance staff

Where: UW Botanic Gardens – Center for Urban Horticulture, NHS Hall (3501 NE 41st St)

When: Tuesday, May 17th, 8:45am-4pm. Reception to follow 4-6pm.

Cost: $85. Lunches available for $15. Free lunch available for the first 100 registrants

How: Register online, or by phone (206-685-8033)

We’ll see you there!

Tour Spring Ephemerals at the Miller Garden

March 21st, 2016 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

miller_garden_2014-031See some of the best and choicest plants for creating a lovely early season display. While strolling through the Miller Garden, you will learn how the garden weaves early spring flowering bulbs and perennials into the landscape. Join Richie Steffen, curator of the garden, and enthusiastic guide, as he shares his knowledge and expertise of these delightful garden gems. Space is limited so reserve your spot today.

What: Tour of the Miller Garden

When: Thursday, April 7th, 1-3pm

Where: The Elisabeth C. Miller Garden in the Highlands
(Directions will be sent after registration)

Cost: $25

How: Register Online, or call 206-685-8033

 

miller_garden_2014-008

Spring Family Nature Classes

March 16th, 2016 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

We are happy to announce that our Spring Classes are open for registration!

Join us for a Family Nature Class and make connections with the natural world that will last a lifetime! Through science-based exploration and outdoor play, preschoolers(2-5 years) and their caregivers will experience the UW Botanic Gardens using their senses.

Classes are Wednesday through Saturday 9:30 to 11:30am (We are not offering any older student Friday afternoon classes at this time)

Week of: Theme
March 30-April 2 Dirt!
April 6-9 Trees and Seasons
April 13-16 Forests Are a Healthy Home
April 20-23 Our Planet Earth – Celebrate Earth Day
April 27-30 Tree Appreciation – Celebrate Arbor Day
May 4-7 WEEK OFF  – Come to our Bioblitz Friday night and Saturday all day!
May 11-14 Flowers and Pollinators
May 18-21 What Makes a Bird a Bird
May 25-28 Owls
June 1-4 Birds on the Water
June 8-11 Wetlands

kids with binos

Feel free to register online, or call 206-685-8033. Please call if you have a class credit to use!

Cost is $18/class, $9 for additional children, (additional adults free) and there is a discount for purchasing 6 or more at once.

Meet our teachers!

Wednesday and Thursday: Tifanie Treter
Tifanie Treter received her Naturalist Certificate from the Morton Arboretum, near Chicago, where she was a lead guide for school field trips, family programs, and summer camps. After relocating to Seattle, she has volunteered at the Washington Park Arboretum with the school programs and the Fiddleheads Forest School.  In her free time Tifanie enjoys learning about her new Pacific Northwest surroundings through exploring the many natural areas that surround Seattle. She looks forward to sharing the Arboretum with the many families that visit!

Fridays: Lisa Sanphillippo:
Lisa Sanphillippo is a Certified Interpretive Guide and Naturalist living in Seattle for 23 years.  Her background is in theater, but she has been an informal educator for 17 years – the last 12 here at UW Botanic Gardens leading field trips for preschool to high school students at both Washington Park Arboretum and Center for Urban Horticulture.  Lisa is super excited to work with families exploring and discovering the wonders of nature at both sites.

Saturdays: Stephanie Aragon
Stephanie Aragon is an Environmental Educator, born and raised in the Pacific Northwest. Her background is in Anthropology and Environmental Studies, looking at how humans and the environment interact.  When Stephanie is not teaching Family Nature classes, she explores the natural world with students at the Fiddleheads Forest School, and presents engaging programs and experiences at the Woodland Park Zoo. Stephanie approaches environmental education with a sense of wonder and excitement. She can’t wait to join you on adventures that foster our fundamental appreciation for the natural world.

More information…

First Aid with Plants

February 22nd, 2016 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant
Heidi Bohan will show how to prepare simple plant remedies - perfect for hikers!

Heidi Bohan will show how to prepare simple plant remedies – perfect for hikers!

Learn how to use common native and wild plants for first aid along the way during your outdoor travels, using poultices, infusions, compresses, syrups and more made simply from raw plants. We will learn plant identification and preparation techniques, and practice these techniques in sample scenarios. Each person takes home a set of laminated Journey Plant Medicine Cards.

Instructor Heidi Bohan is an ethnobotanist known regionally for her knowledge of native traditional plants and their uses. She has worked extensively with local tribes, organizations and schools throughout the Pacific Northwest for over twenty years. She serves as adjunct faculty at Bastyr University and advisor for Northwest Indian College Traditional Plants Program. She is author of The People of Cascadia – Pacific Northwest Native American History, Starflower Native Plant ID Cards, Journey Plant Medicine Cards, and numerous other publications.

WHAT: Journey Plant Medicines

WHEN: Saturday, March 19, 2016, 10am – 4:30pm

WHERE: UW Botanic Gardens – Washington Park Arboretum, Wisteria Hall (2300 Arboretum Drive E, Seattle, WA 98112)

HOW MUCH: $75

REGISTER: Online, or call 206-685-8033

Take home these handy laminated cards, perfect for camping, hiking, or canoeing

Take home these handy laminated cards, perfect for camping, hiking, or canoeing