Bioblitz 2011

September 9th, 2011 by Arboretum Education Supervisor, Patrick Mulligan

 

The UW Botanic Gardens is pleased to announce BIOBLITZ 2011, the 3rd installation of a long-term citizen science experiment aimed at measuring and tracking biodiversity within the Washington Park Arboretum – a 230 acre collection of trees founded in 1934 making it Seattle’s 4th oldest public park.

Bioblitz 2010 was held last May and attended by over 100 volunteers comprised of scientists, both professional and aspiring, of all ages and interests. Approximately 400 species from a variety of taxa groups, including a potentially new species of Philodromus crab spider.

foster island phil1The Fungus Among Us”, a special edition held in partnership with the Puget Sound Mycological Society and focused entirely on mushrooms was held in October, 2010. Close to 80 volunteers collected approximately 500 specimens during four 3-hour shifts.

With these base line numbers, we now have some idea of who is calling the WPA “home”, but these two surveys provide only snapshots of the ever changing story being played out upon this piece of urban green space. In order to gain a deeper understanding of this special place, we strive to duplicate our experiment and turn these snapshots into a movie. Our mission at the UWBG is to “sustain managed to natural ecosystems and the human spirit through plant research, display, and education.” You are invited to help us fulfill that mission by taking part in this unique event.

What: Small field groups surveying various habitats for different taxa groups during six 2.5 hour shifts over a 24 hour period.

When:  October 21 – 22

What time:

Friday, Oct. 21st                                                            Saturday, Oct. 22nd

  • 3pm-5:30                                                                     7am – 9am
  • 5:30 – 7pm (cookout dinner/lecture)              9am – 11:30
  • 7pm – 9pm                                                                   12pm – 2:30
  • 9pm – 11:30                                                                  2:30 – 3pm (show & tell)

Who:  Anyone and everyone, no experience necessary, just a healthy curiosity.

Cost:  FREE

How:  RSVP for specific shifts to simsigan@uw.edu or call 206-616-3381

 

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Learn field sketching and botanical watercolor

August 24th, 2011 by Jennifer Youngman, Communications Specialist

Koi Rock by Suzanne FerrisIn a single, all-day Plein Air Field Sketching workshop Sept. 24, botanical artist Suzanne Ferris will get you started indoors by drawing basic shapes and then head outdoors to discover the same shapes in trees and shrubs. You’ll consider “value veils” for creating depth, one- and two-point perspective, point of view and the process of seeing by mark making, while working in sumi and walnut ink as well as soft graphite. Register by Sept. 12to secure the Early Bird Price of $75. Suzanne’s work is pictured at right.

In Beginning Botanical Watercolor, botanical artist and instructor Kathleen McKeehen will show you how the application of controlled washes and the dry-brush technique produce images that are three-dimensional and aesthetically appealing. Five weekly classes meet at the Center for Urban Horticulture 7:00-9:30 PM beginning Sept. 28. Register by Sept. 16 to secure the Early Bird Price of $170.

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Discover Hidden Water-ways on a Kayak Tour of the Arboretum

July 13th, 2011 by Arboretum Education Supervisor, Patrick Mulligan

Kayaking at the Arboretum

Discover Hidden Water-ways on a Guided Kayak Tour of the Washington Park Arboretum The UWBG is unique among other botanic gardens in the country in that our "grounds" include quite a bit of water. Owing to our location around Lake Washington, our approximately 300 acres include the longest stretch of freshwater marsh in Washington State. There is no better way to enjoy this wetland ecosystem than by kayak. The Agua Verde Paddle Club in partnership with the UWBG is pleased to offer guided kayak tours of our Foster Island Wetlands to the public for the third consecutive summer. Tours are approximately 90 minutes in length and push off from "Duck Bay" at the north end of the Washington Park Arboretum. During the tour you will learn a little about the history of the area and have a chance to meet some of our plant and animal residents. All proceeds will go from Agua Verde Paddle Club to the UWBG for the Agua Verde Scholarship fund. This fund will help provide educational opportunities to students and schools with limited resources. No experience necessary. Double kayaks, safety equipment and a brief training session will be provided by Agua Verde Paddle Club. Youth & children under the age of 18 must be accompanied by their parent/guardian. Tour Dates & Times Wednesday, Aug. 29th: 11am & 3pm Thursday, Aug. 30th: 11am & 3pm Wednesday, Sept. 5th: 11am & 3pm Thursday, Sept. 6th: 11am & 3pm Friday, Sept. 7th: 7am ("early birders"), 11am & 3pm Cost & Registration: Space is limited to 12 participants per tour, so pre-registration is required. Cost: $30/person; ($5 discount for early registration before August 1st) To register, CLICK HERE


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Aquatic Weed Symposium – July 13, 2011

June 7th, 2011 by UWBG Horticulturist

A loosestrife by any other name. . .

If you have trouble remembering this plant’s name, you might try thinking of the strife it has let loose on our wetlands.

In 2009, the Department of Ecology awarded the UW Botanic Gardens a 5-year grant for the control of garden loosestrife (Lysimachia vulgaris), a class B noxious weed mandated for control by the King County Noxious Weed Control Board. Now we’re hosting a symposium featuring the latest observations and expertise on aquatic weed management.

In his keynote address, Steve Manning, founder and president of Invasive Plant Control, Inc., will present economically and environmentally sound techniques for controlling invasive aquatic weeds. You’ll also hear from King County Noxious Weed Specialist Katie Messick and representatives from the UW Botanic Gardens and Seattle Parks Department. The afternoon will be devoted to a kayak or walking tour (your choice) through Lake Washington’s wetlands, one of garden loosestrife’s primary haunts in this region.

Designed for professional audiences, this symposium is open to everyone interested in aquatic weeds and their control.

Managing Aquatic Weeds: Challenges and Opportunities
Wednesday, July 13, 9:00 AM-3:30 PM
Graham Visitors Center, Washington Park Arboretum, 2300 Arboretum Dr. E, Seattle
Professional Credits: WSDA, WSNLA (pending)
Symposium with Kayak Tour, $55; Symposium with Walking Tour, $30
Box lunch included when you register by July 10: 206-685-8033 or online

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Super Fun Summer Camp at the Arboretum

May 18th, 2011 by Arboretum Education Supervisor, Patrick Mulligan
summer camp photograph

Kids planting a garden at summer camp

Summer camp at the Washington Park Arboretum takes place in July this year.

  • Week 1: Native Plants and People (July 11 – 15)
  • Week 2: Little Green Thumbs (July 18 – 22)
  • Week 3: Arboretum Detectives (July 25 – 29)

Read the full theme descriptions and learn how to register at the Summer Programs page.

Family Fun Day May 22, 2011 gives a taste of what summer camp holds.

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Science, Services and Performance of Sustainable Sites

April 15th, 2011 by Tech Librarian, Tracy Mehlin

Date: Wednesday May 18, 2011
Time: 9 am to 3:30 pm
Location: NHS Hall at the Center for Urban Horticulture
Register online.

CUH Dry Stream BedThe Washington Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects and the University of Washington
Botanic Gardens present this symposium on issues surrounding the Sustainable Sites Initiative. This day-long
event will dig into the science behind and intent of the Sustainable Sites Initiative with a focus on how the SITES guidelines can transform our urban ecosystems, horticulture industry, and design and construction practices. Educational sessions and small group dialogue will identify the current obstacles and brainstorm ways to hurdle them. The day will build cross-disciplinary relationships, with focused discussion among horticultural specialists, landscape architects, nursery industry representatives, arborists, planners, scientists, landscape maintenance contractors and city staff.

Keynote address: Urban Ecosystem Services and Their Value by Kathleen Wolf, Ph.D.  Dr. Wolf is a Research Social Scientist with the College of the Environment, University of Washington, and has a joint appointment with the USDA Forest Service Pacific NW Research Station to help develop a program on Urban Natural Resources Stewardship.

  • The What and Why of Sustainable Sites Initiative by David McDonald. Mr. McDonald is a biologist and environmental scientist with Seattle Public Utilities, focusing on soil science and environmentally friendly landscape design and development practices. He serves on the technical core committee of the national Sustainable Sites Initiative.
  • Salmon Safe Program: Local Performance Demonstrated by Ellen Southard. Ms. Southard, Honorary AIA, is the Outreach Coordinator for Salmon Safe and Stewardship Partners. She is a trained community engagement facilitator with 20 years experience advising on low impact development and preservation.
  • Urban Design and Sustainable Sites: Dual Performances or Dueling Performances? by
    Brice Maryman. Mr. Maryman is a landscape architect with SvR Design Company.  His work focuses on making urban systems that are humane, ecologically-responsive, healthy and equitable.
  • Can Nurseries Meet the Objectives of SITES? by Tom Quigley.  Mr. Quigley is the owner and manager of Olympic Nursery in Woodinville, a retail/wholesale nursery and landscape installation firm specializing in trees, and past president of WSNLA.
  • Breakout group discussions and reporting on solutions and next steps

Cost: $75, lunch included.
Available credits: LAs, WSNLA, APLD WA, ISA
Contact: Jean Robins at 206-685-8033.

Symposium flyer and print registration form.

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2011 Urban Forest Symposium

March 8th, 2011 by Tech Librarian, Tracy Mehlin

Arboretum Drive by E. WeltyTrees and the Urban Infrastructure

Plant Amnesty and the University of Washington Botanic Gardens are reprising their highly successful Urban Forestry Symposium, an all day event at the Center for Urban Horticulture. The past two symposiums have focused on the value and preservation of trees; this year’s event will delve into the nitty gritty of how can trees and urban infrastructure co-exist. The event will bring together highly-regarded “tree people” from a variety of fields that affect urban trees, including ecologists, arborists, landscape architects, and utility planners. The symposium promises to be highly informative, with sessions covering topics ranging from foundational values to technical solutions and political strategies. Inspirational keynote speaker Chris Maser has been called “Gandhi of the forest”. He is a research ecologist and courageous writer who rethinks the future beyond simple slogans – using hard science and the wisdom of the ages he can and will show us how the urban forest can be designed to effectively serve the citizens of the city. Additional presentations and panels promise to be lively.

Where:                UWBG Center for Urban Horticulture, 3501 NE 41st Street, Seattle 98105

When:                  Monday, May 9, 2011 from 9 am to 4 pm

Cost:                      $55.   Lunch is an additional $15.  Bringing your own sack lunch is also an                                     option.  There will be a free lunch for the first 50 registrants.

Credits:                Credits available for ISA, WALP, WSNLA, APLD WA and ASLA members.

Contact:               Jean Robins at 206-685-8033, jrobins@uw.edu

Complete informationRegister online or print and return this registration form.

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Free Weekend Walks

March 3rd, 2011 by Tech Librarian, Tracy Mehlin

Magnolia by L. ThornbergEvery month on the first and third Sundays get outside and enjoy a free guided tour of the beautiful Arboretum.

Sunday, 11am – 12:30pm and 1 – 2:30pm
Location: Washington Park Arboretum, 2300 Arboretum Dr. East, Seattle.

Our Weekend Walks are led by experienced, trained, knowledgeable and engaging docents. The 11 am tours of each month are themed tours. March’s theme is Harbingers of Spring. Right about now we are all dreaming of spring. It’s not too far away! Get an early glimpse of the bright colors of spring by visiting early blooming Rhodies, Magnolias and Camellias.

Photo by Samantha Kimble

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