November 2013 Plant Profile: Camellia sasanqua ‘Setsugekka’

November 4th, 2013 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes

Camellia 2After a tremendous autumn display, the show continues in the landscape with wonderful fall and winter blooming plants that take center stage. This lovely selection of the fall/winter blooming Camellia sasanqua is highly coveted by garden designers for its glossy, dark green, evergreen foliage and simple flowers that do not leave a horrible mess once they’re through flowering.

‘Setsugekka’ has lovely pure white flowers with stunning yellow stamens that begin blooming in late October. It has a soft, earthy scent to its flowers and it has somewhat of a free and open habit that lends itself to being trained up against a wall as an espalier that provides a dark green background to others plants during the spring and summer months when its not blooming.

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Common Name: Fall-Blooming Camellia
Location: Fragrance Garden/NHS Hall Bed
Origin: Garden Origin
Height and Spread: 10-15′ high x 7′ wide
Bloom Time: October-February

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October 2013 Plant Profile: Hypericum Hypearls™

October 1st, 2013 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes

Hypericum 3Since our sample plants arrived three years ago from Blooms of Bressingham, this series of hybrid St. John’s Wort has really impressed us with their vigor, beauty, and reliability out in the garden.  These short shrubs are wonderful in bedding; not only are their showy yellow flowers attractive, it’s the fruit on these tidy plants that are the main draw.

Luminous pink to captivating corals, they often will be blooming and fruiting at the same time making them exquisite in floral arrangements. Even the ripened black fruit remain intact and are quite ornamental.

 

 

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Hypericum Hypearls™ Olivia with Erigeron ‘Prosperity’ poking through

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Hypericum Hypearls™ Renu

Hypericum 2

Hypericum Hypearls™ Renu with older fruit

Common Name: Hybrid St. John’s Wort
Location: Blooms of Bressingham Plant Trials
Origin: Garden Origin
Height and Spread: 2-3′ high x 3″ wide
Bloom/Fruit Time: Mid-June-Frost

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September 2013 Plant Profile: Osteospermum ‘Whirligig’

August 30th, 2013 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes

Osteo 4Probably the most asked about plant in our seasonal container plantings, this unique African Daisy is both eye-catching and remarkably easy to grow. ‘Whirligig’ is referred to as a “spoon” type of hybrid where the tips of each petal is scalloped and rounded in shape.

Osteospermum come in various colors and are easy annuals provided that they receive full sun, regular water and fertilizer and in a mild winter, some plants may overwinter and come back the following season.

 

 

 

Common Name: African Daisy
Location: Container at the entrance of Merrill Hall at the Center for Urban Horticulture.
Origin: Garden Origin
Height and Spread: 8-12″ high x 12″ wide
Bloom Time: June-Frost

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August 2013 Plant Profile: Cortaderia richardii

August 6th, 2013 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes

Cort habitIn recognition of the installation of New Zealand’s focal forest at the Pacific Connections Garden, we highlight a stunning ornamental grass that certainly attracts attention at this time of year. The “toe toe” grass is a relative of the more common, but often troublesome Pampas grass (C. selloana).

C. richardii is far more elegant and their plumes arch and sway in a gentle breeze making a dramatic impact in the landscape. It takes full sun and is quite adaptable to poor soils. It is best used as a single specimen or as a grouping of 3-5 clumps so you can admire its form and habit.

Cort 2Like a few Ornamental grasses, it has the potential to re-seed in warmer climates, but it hasn’t been considered invasive here in the Pacific Northwest. Like any plant we’ve accessioned at UWBG, we will closely monitor its habit and take appropriate action should it ever become a problem. For now, we will enjoy it’s striking presence in the New Zealand entry at the Pacific Connections Garden and the South Slope of the Soest Perennial Garden.

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Common Name: Toe Toe Grass, Plumed Tussock Grass
Location: Soest Garden – South Slope, WPA Pacific Connections New Zealand
Origin: New Zealand
Height and Spread: 5-7′  high x 5ft. wide
Bloom Time:  July with plume lasting through the winter months.

 

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July 2013 Plant Profile: Single & Dark-leaf Dahlias

July 12th, 2013 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes
Dahlia 'Bashful'

Dahlia ‘Bashful’

Not many garden plants can challenge the constant bloom and remarkable display dahlias put on in a summer garden. Their extravagant blooms come in a wide selection of different shapes, forms and seemingly endless colors. With thousands of varieties to choose from, I’ve tried to seek out types that are often hard to find and are a little more unusual.
Dark-leafed dahlias are all the rage in Europe, but a limited number are available to avid gardeners and collectors so I wanted to make sure that they were represented in our regularly irrigated sandy clay loam Bed 8 in full hot sun.

Dahlia 'Moonfire'

Dahlia ‘Moonfire’

Dahlias flowers have a tendency to dominate a planting scheme, especially large dinner-plate types that tend to look gaudy and out of scale and the stems always require support. I’ve also sought out varieties that have single flowers and have a more open growth habit so they compliment other plants in a flower bed.

Planted in the spring, dahlias are typically grown from tuberous roots or rooted cuttings. They grow quickly with heat and regular applications of an organic fertilizer. They begin blooming this month and can continue on until frost if one keeps the spent flowers off. Tubers can be left in the ground over winter if you have them growing in soil that drains well and then provide a good thick mulch in the fall. To be on the safe side, tubers may be carefully lifted after frost has zapped the plant and stored in a box with soil  left intact.  Keep them in a cool unheated garage until spring.

Dahlia 'Bishop of York'

Dahlia ‘Bishop of York’

Common Name: Dahlia cultivars
Location: Soest Garden – Bed 8
Origin: Garden Origin
Height and Spread: 2-6′  high x 2ft. wide
Bloom Time:  July-first frost

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June 2013 Plant Profile: Lilium ‘Tiger Babies’

June 6th, 2013 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes

Tiger Babies

Striking elegance with remarkable hardiness and vigor, this lily has withstood the test of time and is considered a classic amongst lily growers worldwide. ‘Tiger Babies’ is a complex hybrid that was bred from the often virus-infected “tiger lily” (Lilium lacifolium). Breeding has made it virus free and a welcomed summer-flowering bulb each year.

Soft shades of cantaloupe orange blushed with pink as they open with heavy brown spots color the pendant, nodding flowers that have a very slight scent to them.  They have strong stems and do not require staking and they are quick to multiply compared to many other lily Asiatic lilies.

Common Name: Tiger Babies Asiatic Lily
Location: Soest Garden – Bed 6
Origin: Garden Origin
Height and Spread: 3-4′  high x 1ft. wide
Bloom Time:  June

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May 2013 Plant Profile: Pacific Coast Irises

May 3rd, 2013 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes

Iris 'Ami Royale'The Pacific Northwest is home to a remarkable assortment of plants that are the envy of other gardeners across the country and the Pacific Coast Iris hybrids are among them.

With their remarkable variation in colors, evergreen foliage and tolerance of drought and some shade, this type of iris has become quite the workhorse in the spring garden come late April and into May. Over the past few years, more and more Northwest gardeners are beginning to discover Pacific Coast irises and, in some cases, even collect the handful of named selections that exist.

Pacific Coast Iris hybrids are comprised of several species that exist throughout the west coast of Washington, Oregon and California. While straight native species such as I. douglasii and I. tenax are readily available and are fine garden plants, it’s these remarkable hybrids that gardeners crave. With grassy foliage and profuse flowers, they rarely get over 12″ tall and are wonderful planted in perennial beds and the ever-so-difficult spot of planting underneath a tree! Given time to establish, they are remarkably drought-tolerant and easy to care for.

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In the Soest Garden, we’ve introduced a plant that’s been passed around for many years, yet it hasn’t been properly registered as a named cultivar. It’s actually a division from a clump that’s growing at the Washington Park Arboretum where not many people get to see and enjoy it. This is a selection named ‘Ami Royale’.

 

Common Name: Pacific Coast Iris
Location: Soest Garden – Bed 7
Origin: Garden Origin
Height and Spread: 8-12″ high x 1.5 feet wide
Bloom Time:  Mid-Spring

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April 2013 Plant Profile: Akebia quinata ‘Alba’

April 2nd, 2013 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes

Akebia quinata 'Alba' bloom detailWe have an increasing number of vines here at the Center for Urban Horticulture and this particular selection is one that’s been around the longest.

Often dubbed as the “Chocolate Vine”, the typical species flower is generally a deep purple with a gentle, yet deliciously scented blossoms. It is a deciduous and very fast growing vine that will require support. This rare white form (possibly the same as the selection named ‘Shirobana’) is absolutely lovely, but often overlooked.

It can cover the side of walls, spill over banks, climb over just about anything with its pliable and supple vines that can easily be trained and also contained with regular summer pruning of excessive “Whips”.

I’ve yet to see this white-flowered form set fruit, but it should be possible. It produces a large pod with gelatinous fruit with a sweet pulp and many seeds.

 

Akebia quinata 'Alba' The lovely and highly unusual flowers of Akebia with  the large female flower dominating with smaller, but more prolific male flowers that hold the pollen.

Akebia quinata 'Alba' habitHere you can see its habit taking up the corner of NHS Hall at the Center for Urban Horticulture

  

Common Name: White-Flowered Chocolate Vine, White Five-leafed Akebia
Location: CUH-Fragrance Garden, NHS Hall
Origin: China/Japan/Korea
Height and Spread: Can climb 25-30ft.
Bloom Time:  Early Spring

 

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March 2013 Plant Profile: Edgeworthia chrysantha

March 7th, 2013 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes

photo 3I always attempt to showcase a different plant , but for the second year in a row, I simply couldn’t resist mentioning a species that people who visit UW Botanic Garden’s  Center for Urban Horticulure at this time will be asking about because it’s looking the best its ever looked for us.

Making a grand return this month is Edgeworthia chrysantha all by itself!

I paired it with its close relative Daphne odora last year, but with the mild winter we’ve had, both of our specimens came through beautifully and it’s just starting to bloom its heads off! And like it’s relative, it is WONDERFULLY FRAGRANT!

They can be finicky to get established. Make you you choose a spot with sun/part shade, and it benefits from a protected location as well as it’s not as hardy as the Daphnes here in the Pacific Northwest. Rich, well drained soil is a must along with regular irrigation during the summer and fall while buds are setting and avoid moving it around as with most daphnes, mature specimens will sulk if transplanted.

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Common Name: Chinese Paper Bush, Yellow Daphne
Location: CUH-Fragrance Garden, Miller Library North beds
Origin: China
Height and spread: 6ft. high and 6-7ft. wide (usually smaller)
Bloom Time: Winter

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February 2013 Plant Profile: Cyclamen coum

February 1st, 2013 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes

Cyclamen coum portraitWho says there isn’t much color in the landscape in the winter time? The month of February is peak bloom for one of the most delicate, yet tough plants in the winter garden. Hugging the ground with it’s rounded foliage often mottled and marked with silver patterns, this prolific tuberous perennial sends out multiple buds that gently emerge and, all of a sudden, burst  into bloom.

What makes Cyclamen coum so charming are their diminuitive size and the diversity of leaf color and patterns on the foliage and the vibrant colors that seem to appear in the ground as if a child had spilled a bag full of candy! They come in wonderful whites, pinks, purples,  lavenders and an occasional darker colored “eye” giving a bi-color effect.

Through the rigors of winter, whether it be  gloomy and wet or  bitter cold, these delicate charmers are as tough as can be.  Even gardeners with winters temperatures dropping down to -15F can enjoy these cheery flowers once the snow melts and the weather warms.

 

They are wonderful under deciduous trees and shrubs or even scattered about in a lawn where you don’t want children and pets playing in during the winter.

 

Cyclamen coum Common Name: Winter Cyclamen

Location: Soest Garden – Bed 7

Origin: Eastern Europe/Turkey/Caucasus

Exposure: Part sun – shade

Height and spread: 2-3ft. tall x 5ft. wide

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