Supporting LIDAR research in the Washington Park Arboretum

May 17th, 2012 by Heidi Unruh, UWBG Communications Volunteer
graphic
Three‐dimensional 
visualization 
of 
the 
Arboretum
 derived 
from 
LiDAR 
and 
aerial
 photo. Graphic by Jeff Richardson

Did you know that the Washington Park Arboretum often serves as a research site for researchers at the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences? Recently, researchers at UW have been using the Arboretum to study LiDAR and its applications. LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) is a method of airborne laser scanning that can be used as a tool to inventory and manage forests. Below are some of the research papers discussing their findings.

Akira Kato, L. Monika Moskal, Peter Schiess, Mark E. Swanson, Donna Calhoun, Werner Stuetzle, Capturing tree crown formation through implicit surface reconstruction using airborne lidar data.  Remote Sensing of the Environment. Volume 113, Issue 6, 15 June 2009, Pages 1148-1162.

Kim, Sooyoung; Hinckley, Thomas; Briggs, David. Classifying individual tree genera using stepwise cluster analysis based on height and intensity metrics derived from airborne laser scanner data, Remote Sensing of Environment. Volume 115, Issue 12, 15 December 2011, Pages 3329-3342.

Moskal, L.M.; Zheng, G. Retrieving Forest Inventory Variables with Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) in Urban Heterogeneous Forest. Remote Sens. 2012, 4, 1-20.

Richardson, Jeffery J.; Moskal, Monika; Kim, Soo-Hyung. Modeling approaches to estimate effective leaf area index from aerial discrete-return LIDAR. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, Volume 149, Issues 6–7, 15 June 2009, Pages 1152-1160.

Vaughn, N.R.; Moskal, L.M.; Turnblom, E.C. Fourier transformation of waveform Lidar for species recognition. Remote Sensing Letters, 2011, Volume 2, Number 4, 347 – 356.

Vaughn, N.R.; Moskal, L.M.; Turnblom, E.C. Tree Species Detection Accuracies Using Discrete Point Lidar and Airborne Waveform Lidar. Remote Sens. 2012, 4, 377-403.

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FlorAbundance: Seattle’s best plant sale moves back to the Arboretum

April 17th, 2012 by Tech Librarian, Tracy Mehlin

photoIf you only make it to one plant sale this spring be sure not to miss FlorAbundance held on April 28th and 29 at the Washington Park Arboretum. The Arboretum Foundation, with many, many volunteers organize and host the sale that features dozens of specialty nursery vendors and expert help from the King County Master Gardeners.

Complete information on the Arboretum Foundation site.

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Get Your Hands Dirty this Earth Day

April 7th, 2012 by UWBG Horticulturist

Join the Student Conservation Association (SCA), the University of Washington Botanic Gardens (UWBG), and Seattle Parks and Recreation for a day of fun service projects at the Washington Park Arboretum.

When: Saturday, April 14, 2012. 9:00am – 2:00pm

Where: Washington Park Arboretum, 2300 Arboretum Drive E, Seattle 98112. (Meet in the Meadow—a 5 minute walk south of the Graham Visitors Center.)

What to bring: water bottle, sack lunch, travel mug for a hot drink, sunscreen, rain gear, long pants, layers of clothing, and boots. Some snacks & drinks will be provided. Tools, gloves, snacks, environmental education, and project materials will be provided.

photo
Student volunteers having fun spreading mulch at the Arboretum at a previous Earth Day event.

PLEASE RSVP to the SCA

For more information and to register, visit thesca.org/seattle, email wanw@thesca.org or call 206.324.4649

Printable Flyer 

Map of project locations at Washington Park Arboretum

In partnership with the Seattle Parks and Recreation, UW Botanic Gardens and Woodland Park Zoo.

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7th Annual Garden Lovers’ Book Sale

March 27th, 2012 by Heidi Unruh, UWBG Communications Volunteer

Spring is the perfect time to update your gardening library with new inspiration. Choose from thousands of used gardening, horticulture, botany and landscape design books at the Miller Library’s 7th annual Garden Lovers’ Book Sale.

Want to get first dibs and beat the crowds, all while enjoying a glass of wine? Join us for the Wine and Cheese Preview Party on Friday, April 6, from 5:00 to 8:00 pm, and bid on specially selected books in the silent auction. Tickets to the Preview Party are $20 each, and directly fund the book budget of the Miller Library. Contact the Library at 206-543-0415 to purchase tickets.

The book sale takes place on Saturday, April 7, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Admittance is free. While you’re there, be sure to check out the original Pacific Northwest botanical artwork on exhibit and for sale through May 5.

The sale and preview party will take place at the Center for Urban Horticulture, UWBG, 3501 NE 41st Street, Seattle. All proceeds from the book sale and preview party directly fund the book and journal budget of the Miller Library.

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And the Winners Are…..Biodiversity Conference Art Exhibit up through March

March 19th, 2012 by Wendy Gibble

Paintbrush and Sedge illustration by Louise Smith

The winners of the botanical art exhibit  held in conjunction with the conference Conserving Plant Biodiversity in a Changing World: A View from NW North America were announced Wednesday afternoon at the close of the conference.  The winners are:

Botanical Illustration:
1st Place: Louise Smith for Paintbrush and Sedge
2nd Place: Daphne Morris for Carex macrocephala
3rd Place: Jan Hurd for Rosa nutkana

Photograph:
1st place: Daniel Mosquin for Castilleja applegatei var. pinetorum
2nd Place: Michael Hannam for Veratrum viride
3rd Place: Morgan Turner for Blechnum spicant

The exhibit is on display in the Elisabeth C. Miller Library at the UW Botanic Gardens through March 29th.


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Are Weddings Allowed at the UW Botanic Gardens?

January 10th, 2012 by Tech Librarian, Tracy Mehlin

Answer:  Yes!  Weddings and all social events are a natural fit at the beautiful Center for Urban Horticulture (CUH) and Washington Park Arboretum (WPA).   Weddings and many other social events are booked months, even a year, in advance at both of these sites.

NHS Hall photo

Imagine your wedding reception at the beautiful and affordable UW Botanic Gardens

Our wedding packages include tables, chairs, catering kitchen, parking and staffing.  The surrounding gardens and patios further enhance your event and are included in the package.  Other social event rental packages such as memorial services, auctions and parties are available – ask our reservationists for pricing tailored to your event.

Where would a wedding or other event take place?

Answer:  We have two sites to choose from.  The CUH is a distinctive Northwest event destination with a hall, classrooms and outdoor spaces that can be configured for conferences, weddings, meetings, exhibits, auctions and more conveniently located just blocks from the University of Washington (UW) main campus and the University Village shopping center.  The Graham Visitor Center is a unique urban woodland destination with a hall, classroom, conference room and outdoor patio for weddings, meetings, parties and more located in the 230-acre WPA amongst the UW’s collection of plans from around the world.

Arboretum wedding photo

Perfect for an intimate party

To book your wedding or other social event for 2012 or beyond, please contact the Rental Team to discuss your plans, available dates and personal site visit.  Please phone 206-221-2500 or 616-3994.  We look forward to working with you to plan a truly memorable event!

Book Your Events Now for 2012 at UW Botanic Gardens!

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One weekend, two dozen rare plant surveys

November 3rd, 2011 by Jennifer Youngman, Communications Specialist

by Wendy Gibble [edited for the web; see complete article on page 3 of the Rare Plant Press]

Twenty-five volunteers, agency partners and Rare Care staff gathered in Klickitat County in mid-June to monitor known populations of rare plants in the Klickitat Wildlife Area, Conboy National Wildlife Refuge and surrounding areas. We knew from the outset that our survey plans had to be adjusted. Late wet spring conditions caused as much as a one-month delay in the onset of flowering for many species. We were too early to catch the long-bearded sego lily (Calochortus longebarbatus var. longebarbatus) in bloom. But we caught the tail end of Baker’s linanthus (Leptosiphon bolanderi), a tiny spring annual that normally blooms in April and May. Our timing was perfect for finding Pulsifer’s monkey-flower (Mimulus pulsiferae), another tiny annual found in seasonally moist areas that seemed to have benefited from the spring moisture.  

Barrett's beardtongue, photo by Janka Hobbs

Barrett's beardtongue closeup, photo by Betty Swift

Klickitat County was an ideal location for Rare Care’s fifth annual monitoring weekend. It’s at the east end of the Columbia River Gorge, a region that hosts some of the state’s most diverse flora. The Gorge is one of the few places in the northwest where moist Pacific air meets dry Columbia Basin air near sea level, providing a corridor for migration and a refuge for relict populations from previous glacial and interglacial periods. The Columbia River system also provides a significant corridor for species movement from its headwaters in the Rocky Mountain ecoregion of British Columbia, through the Okanogan highlands, Columbia Basin shrub-steppe, and east Cascades, and out to the wetter ecoregion of the west Cascades. The convergence of these topographic features is likely a major factor in the high number of endemic species found in the vicinity.

Keying rare plants on a steep slope, photo by Julie Bresnan

Gooseberry-leaved alumroot, photo by Julie Bresnan

Twenty-four surveys were completed over the three-day campout, including new populations of rare plants such as oblong bluecurls (Trichostema oblongum), western ladies-tresses (Spiranthes porrifolia) and common bluecup (Githopsis specularioides). Regional endemics such as Barrett’s penstemon (Penstemon barrettiae), gooseberry-leaved alumroot (Heuchera grossulariifolia var. tenuifolia), and Suksdorf’s lomatium (Lomatium suksdorfii) are locally common on the cliffs and steep slopes of the Klickitat River. We monitored several populations of each and documented several new sites while surveying for other rare plant populations. We also monitored blue-flowered diffuse stickseed (Hackelia diffusa var. diffusa) and the very rare Ames’ milk-vetch (Astragalus pulsiferae var. suksdorfii), found in Washington only from an area around Conboy National Wildlife Refuge.

Diffuse stickseed, photo by Julie Bresnan

Identifying rare plants in a cool June, photo by Bev Linde

Although we accomplished so much in the short three days we had, we wrapped up the monitoring weekend with the impression that there is still much ground to cover in the region. We look forward to more explorations in the basalt canyons and pine woodlands in the coming years.

Images from top left:

  • Barrett’s penstemon, photo by Janka Hobbs
  • Barrett’s penstemon, photo by Betty Swift
  • Keying gooseberry-leaved alumroot on a steep slope, photo by Julie Bresnan
  • Gooseberry-leaved alumroot, photo by Julie Bresnan
  • Diffuse stickseed, photo by Julie Bresnan
  • Monitoring rare plants in a cool June, photo by Bev Linde

You may view additional photos on Rare Care’s page on Facebook.

 

 

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Oral History of UWBG Open House Nov. 1

September 28th, 2011 by Carrie Bowman

Oral History of Washington Park Arboretum, the Arboretum Foundation and the Center for Urban Horticulture

Graham Visitor Center

In 2010, a combined effort of many donors, led by John Wott, funded an oral history project, administered by the Miller Library. Carrie Bowman is supervising the project; Shelly Leavens was hired last November and spent the past ten months conducting research and interviewing people. People with long term associations with the Washington Park Arboretum, the Arboretum Foundation, and/or the Center for Urban Horticulture were invited to participate. Carrie, with the help of many others, looked for narrators who fulfilled multiple roles within these organizations, as well as seeking narrators from outside them.

The collection of interviews is an open door to our history. The intent of this phase of the project was to collect a variety of interviews, index them so that people can determine what was discussed, and organize them so that materials relevant to each interview are gathered in one place. Research materials, field notes, indexes, and narrator data sheets are all included with the interviews. This collection will remain in the Miller Library and will be available for public use. Arboretum Bulletin article.

The public is invited to a presentation of the project on Tuesday, November 1, from 5 – 7 pm in the Miller Library. Several displays will showcase the interview collection and will remain on exhibit in the library from Oct 21 until the week of Nov 20. The displays include audio clips from the interviews, set up so that people can browse at 5-10 different “stations.” Light refreshments will be provided.

Merrill Hall photo

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Pacific Connections Update: Cascadia Bog Development

July 21st, 2011 by Jennifer Youngman, Communications Specialist
new Cascadia bog

The new Cascadia bog is a perfect solution for a wet spot.

When the Cascadia section of the Pacific Connections Garden was under construction, a natural depression appeared. Recognizing the potential for this poorly-draining area, Jason Henry of the Berger Partnership incorporated a Cascadian bog into the design. Pacific Connections Gardener Kyle Henegar explains, “Creating the bog is a long-term process as the soil conditions mature, the plants are phased in, and as Roy Farrow and I continue to procure and stage snags and rocks to create a more realistic-looking garden. I suggest visitors come visit the bog frequently to see how it ages over time and develops the beautiful patina of a native bog.”

An irrigation system will keep the soil soggy during dry months. Vegetation includes Andromeda polifolia, Ledum glandulosum and Rhododendron occidentale grown from seed collected in the Siskiyou Mountains by Collections Manager Randall Hitchin, and Darlingtonia californica from the UW Botany Greenhouse. Native plants such as huckleberry and maidenhair fern are serving as placeholders while bog plants are being phased in. In addition, the Cascadian Focal Forest contains a Siskiyou seep area along the east side of the first stairway. It too is being phased in and is currently full of container-grown native plants and plants grown from wild-collected seed.

Darlingtonia californica

Darlingtonia californica from the UW Botany Greenhouse

Rhododendron occitentale

Rhododendron occidentale grown from seed collected in the Siskiyou Mountains by Collections Manager Randall Hitchin


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Vendor Showcase at CUH for Event Planners

June 1st, 2011 by Tech Librarian, Tracy Mehlin
NHS Hall at the Center for Urban Horticulture

NHS Hall at the Center for Urban Horticulture is perfect for your next wedding or staff retreat.

Purpose: This event will showcase indoor and outdoor venues at UWBG Center for Urban Horticulture and nearly 50 vendors who serve our rental customers for their business meetings, symposiums, conferences, classes, graduations, weddings, bar/bat mitzvahs, auctions, memorial services, parties, fundraisers, etc.

Who’s Hosting: UWBG Rental Program in collaboration with nearly 50 vendors

Who’s Invited: UW department representatives, government representatives, event planners, wedding planners,  the general public shopping for a beautiful rental facility and top-notch vendors

When: Thursday, July 21, 2011, 3:00 – 7:00 p.m.

Where: Center for Urban Horticulture, 3501 NE  41st St. (Near U-Village)

RSVP: 206-221-2500 with name and # attending

Questions: Contact Lauren S. Fortune, UWBG Facilities & Rental Program at 206-685-1706 or laurenf@u.washington.edu

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