Miller Library annual gift show inspired by nature

November 4th, 2014 by UWBG Communication Staff
Monotype by Roberta McDaris Long

Monotype by Roberta McDaris Long

GIFT EXHIBIT December 5 – 23

From December 5th through December 23rd, the Elisabeth C. Miller Library will have a selection of locally made arts and crafts available for purchase. Nature inspired gifts such as hand made tiles, letter press cards, and felted wool flower pins will delight recipients.

OPENING RECEPTION   December 5

Join us for refreshments at the opening reception and sale on Friday, December 5th from 5 to 8pm.

Cash or Check only please! 25% of proceeds benefit the Miller Library.

Participating artists:

  • BARBARA CLARK, carved ceramic tiles
  • JENNY CRAIG, Notta Pixie Press, vintage letterpress cards and gifts
  • AL DODSON, color photographs of bark, trees, plants and landscapes.
  • MOLLY HASHIMOTO, nature-inspired watercolor paintings, prints, cards and calendars
  • JOAN HELBACKA, Elda Grace handcrafted journals
  • ROBERTA MCDARIS LONG botanically themed monoprint cards and prints, shown right
  • SYLVIA PORTILLO, The Human Hand Card Company, cards, prints, dioramas and botanically inspired, felted wool, wearable flowers
  • JENNIFER ROSE, flower photographs, cards and calendars

3501 NE 41st Street, Seattle, WA 98105

Share

November 2014 Plant Profile: Callicarpa dichotoma ‘Early Amethyst’

November 3rd, 2014 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes

IMG_7871Beautyberry is starting to put on quite a show and we have a species that isn’t common in Pacific Northwest Gardens. Callicarpa dichotoma is widely known on the East Coast and thrives in their summer heat and humidity. Having had an exceptionally lengthy summer here, our plants of ‘Early Amethyst’ look the best they’ve ever looked in the three years since they were planted out as small 1 gallon pots.

Combined with consistent moisture in full sun, they’re dripping in hot purple pink and look absolutely stunning in the autumn landscape! We hope the foliage has a chance to color up before a hard frost comes. Meanwhile, they are a sight to behold

Family: LAMIACEAE
Genus: Callicarpa
species: dichotoma
Cultivar: ‘Early Amethyst’
Common Name: Beautyberry
Location: CUH Sidewalk Entry
Origin: China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam
Height and Spread: 4′ high x 4-5′ wide
Bloom/Fruit Time: September-frost

 

 

Growing with the bright gold, moisture loving Acorus gramineus 'Ogon'

Growing with the bright gold, moisture loving Acorus gramineus ‘Ogon’

IMG_7883

C. dichotoma ‘Early Amethyst’ with Persicaria amplexicaulis ‘Taurus’


Share

What to do with fallen leaves? Arborist Chris Watson considers the options

November 2nd, 2014 by UWBG Communication Staff
photo

Beautiful fallen leaves from the Amelanchiers growing at the Center for Urban Horticulture. Photo by Larry Howard 2007

To rake or not to rake? When asked what homeowners should do with leaves falling from trees growing in city gardens, Chris Watson, the Arborist who cares for the trees at the Washington Park Arboretum definitively stated, “It depends!”

Is the best mulch for a tree its own leaves? Or does that spread disease and pests? Chris explained:

“From a nutrient cycling perspective, ideally the leaves would be left in place where they fall.  Much like a forest, this would reduce the need for additional inputs, such as fertilizer. However, the urban situation is quite different from a forest.  We have introduced plants, soils, pests and diseases, as well as the desire for aesthetically pleasing landscapes.  Leaves blow in the wind and have the potential to clog drains.  Also, the first best management practice for most foliar diseases is to remove all leaves when they fall to reduce inoculum.

“When leaf removal is necessary, I recommend composting leaf material if possible.  The compost can then be used to amend soils around landscape plants.  If leaves are diseased, they should be composted in a way that increases the temperature to sterilize pathogens.  This is difficult to do for the typical homeowner, so it may be best to place leaves in the yard waste bin where they will be processed in a suitable manner.”

Share

Don’t Let Winter Keep You Down: Indoor Classes at UW Botanic Gardens

October 31st, 2014 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Just because it is raining outside doesn’t mean you have to stop your plant passions. There are plenty of indoor botanical activities at the UW Botanic Gardens to keep your horticultural spirits high until spring!

Lilium_distichumPD
Did you know that you can enjoy flowers all year round? Bulbs make it easy. Learn from Master Gardner Joan Helbacka about spring bloomers like tulips and daffodils, summertime lilies and iris, fall beauties including autumn crocus and cyclamen and even how to force bulbs to bloom for the winter months in this FREE class. Never have a flowerless day again!

More information…

Rose_herbarium_specimen

 

Back by popular demand, Plant Pressing allows you to create your very own botanical specimen to frame and hang in your office, livingroom, where ever! Taught by Herbarium Manager Eve Rickenbaker, the class includes a tour of the Hyde Herbarium, and allows you to create up to 5 pressed flower cards – perfect for holiday greetings or thank yous. Mounted specimens and cards look like a million bucks, and would retail for over $100!

More information…

 

worm_calimpong

 

 

Interested in reducing the waste your household puts out? And interested in making some delicious, nutritious compost for your plants? Try this introductory FREE class on vermicomposting! All you need is a bin, worms, and food scraps. Let Crescent Calimpong lead you through the rewarding world of composting with worms. Whether you have a small apartment, or a house with extensive gardens, you can fit vermicomposting in to your life and routine.
More information…

 

holiday_TablescapeAnd finally, imagine you are hosting the holiday dinner this year! What will your table look like? Will it impress the in-laws and cousins? Well it certainly will if you take this class! Barbara Selemon will show you how to create a wonderful centerpiece using organic, sustainable and even edible plants to wow your guests. Materials will be provided to make your own tablescape to bring home. Make it as simple or elaborate as you want!
More information… 

 

And in case this wasn’t enough fun stuff to do this winter, our January-March classes are open for registration!

You can register online, or call 206-685-8033.

Share

Interested in graphic design? Miller Library seeks book sale poster design

October 28th, 2014 by UWBG Communication Staff

Calling all artists & designers

 The Miller Library needs a poster design for the 2015 10th anniversary Garden Lovers’ Book Sale.

Tulip Tree FlowerWe seek your donation of creative talents for a new design for the 11 x 17 poster and 5 x 8 postcard advertising the 2015 Garden Lovers’ Book Sale. The successful design will have a plant or garden theme and eye catching appeal. The poster must include the specific details below about the date and location, plus the UW Botanic Garden logo. We will accept submissions through December 29th. Send a message to Tracy at tmehlin@uw.edu for more information. The creator of the selected design will receive two tickets to the book sale preview party.

 


 

GARDEN LOVERS’ BOOK SALE APRIL 3 & 4, 2015
Elisabeth C. Miller Library

CENTER FOR URBAN HORTICULTURE 3501 NE 41ST STREET, SEATTLE

ART EXHIBIT AND SALE PACIFIC NORTHWEST BOTANICAL ARTISTS Continues through May xx

WINE AND CHEESE PREVIEW PARTY AND BOOK SALE FRIDAY, APRIL 3rd FROM 5:00 – 8:00 PM ADVANCE TICKETS: $20

BOOK SALE SATURDAY, APRIL 5TH FROM 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM FREE ADMISSION!

For more information visit www.millerlibrary.org
To purchase party tickets call the library at 206-543-0415

Share

Art exhibit: native plants by Linda Stewart Henley

October 27th, 2014 by UWBG Communication Staff

Linda Stewart Henley: OregonGrapeWatercolors by Linda Stewart Henley will be on exhibit in the Miller Library from November 4th through December 2nd. The paintings of Washington natives, done mostly on location, are accompanied by field notes. The exhibit shows the plants in representational, but not scientifically botanical, style. The poster Washington Shrubby Plants is featured as part of the exhibition.

Meet the artist at a free reception at the Library on Friday, November 14th from 5:00 to 7:00 pm.

Share

October Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum (Part II)

October 27th, 2014 by UWBG Arborist, Chris Watson
Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (October 20 - November 2, 2014)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (October 20 – November 2, 2014)

1)   Euonymus hamiltonianus subsp. sieboldiana                      (Siebold’s  Euonymus)

  • Native to the eastern Himalaya 1
  • Ornamental seed pods on display in autumn months 2
  • Specimen located in the Spindle Tree Collection

 

2)   Illicium henryi      (Henry Anise Tree)

  • Native to western China 1
  • Red summer flowers turn to star-shaped fruits in autumn
  • Specimen located along Upper Trail near the Asiatic Maple Collection

3)   Lithocarpus henryi      (Longleaf Chinquapin)

  • Native to central China 1
  • Notable for “laurel-like, narrow, glossy leaves” 2
  • Specimen located along the Lower Trail near the Sino-Himalayan Hillside

4)   Osmanthus yunnanensis      (Chinese Osmanthus)

  • Native to southern China 1
  • “Less cold-hardy” than other Osmanthus species in Seattle 2
  • Specimen located in the Sino-Himalayan Hillside

5)   Polyspora kwangsiensis      (Fried Egg Plant)

  • Relative of the Camellia and Stewartia 1
  • Camellia-like flowers appear in autumn 1
  • Specimen located along Upper Trail near the Camellia Collection

 

1 Bean, W. J., and George Taylor. 1970.  Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles.  London: J. Murray.
2 Jacobson, Arthur Lee. 2006.  Trees of Seattle.  Seattle, WA: Arthur Lee Jacobson.

Share

Autumn Is Amazing

October 18th, 2014 by Catherine Nelson, Adult Tours Program Assistant

liquidambfallcolorThe Liquidambar styraciflua, or Sweetgum, is one of autumn’s most brilliantly colored trees, its leaves showing off every color in the spectrum.

The Liquidambar was wide spread, existing all over the Northern Hemisphere during the Tertiary Period (250-65 million years ago), but mostly disappeared due to glaciation during the ice age. Now this tree is native only to the SE United States and some areas of Mexico and Central America.  These deciduous trees can grown to 80-100 feet tall & live up to 400 years.  Its species name in Latin means ‘flowing with resin’ as the sweet resin in this tree was originally used for chewing gum.

They can be mistaken for maples as they have a similar palmate leaf. The Sweetgum leaf has 5-7 pointed lobes, but is usually flat along the bottom. They also have a distinctive spiky  brown fruit in autumn.

Our free Weekend Walks 10/19 – 11/16 will take visitors to view this and other deciduous plants in our collection.  Please join us.  See Visit > Tours for more information.

Share

October Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

October 10th, 2014 by UWBG Horticulturist
Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (10/6/14-10/19/14)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (10/6/14-10/19/14)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1)   Franklinia alatamaha

Close-up photo of Franklinia flower

Close-up photo of Franklinia flower

  • Native to the Alatamaha River, Georgia, and discovered in the late 18th.
  • Genus contains just one species, and has long been extinct in the wild. Today’s plants all descend, it is believed, from those cultivated in Philadelphia under the name chosen by William Bartram in honor of Benjamin Franklin.
  • Specimen located along Arboretum Drive near the Camellias.

2)   Ilex crenata      ‘Mariesii’

Close-up photo of Rehderodendron seed pods

Close-up photo of Rehderodendron seed pods

  • A very slow-growing female holly with tiny leaves and black fruit. Collected in Japan around 1890 by Charles Maries and sent to Veitch Nursery.
  • Located within the Asian/North American clade in the Holly wedge.

3)   Rehderodendron macrocarpum

  • An upright deciduous tree with red young shoots and glossy dark green leaves.
  • Native to western China, seeds from macrocarpum were first collected in 1932 from a fruiting specimen on Mount Omei in the Szechwan Province.
  • This specimen is located in grid 36-B, northwest of the Winter Garden.

4)   Sorbus helenae

  • Very distinctive species only recently introduced to cultivation. White fruits and autumn leaf color make helenae an attractive tree this time of year.
  • Located about midway through the Mountain Ashes, west of the path.

5)   Viburnum odoratissimum

  • A vigorous, bushy evergreen shrub with glossy, dark green leaves and red fruit ripening to black.
  • Native to India, China, Burma, Philippines, and Japan.
  • Located in grid 12-8E along Arboretum Drive.
Share

October 2014 Plant Profile: Amaryllis belladonna

October 1st, 2014 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes

IMG_7256A large indoor bulb that’s forced to flower in time for the holidays is often what gardeners think of when we say “Amaryllis.”  Those large, almost dinner plate-sized flowers are actually the genus Hippeastrum. The true Amaryllis, depicted here, is a fall-blooming plant. Though its growth habit is similar to Hippeastrum, it can be grown outdoors in the Pacific Northwest

Native to South Africa, they thrive in Mediterranean type  climates with full sun and well drained soil and are best left undisturbed once planted as they can take several years to flower from bulbs that are regularly available for planting in the spring.

 

 

Family: AMARYLLIDACEAE
Genus: Amaryllis
species: belladonna
Common Name:  Naked Ladies
Location: McVay Courtyard
Origin: South Africa
Height and Spread: 15-18″ tall stems and forms clumps 3-5ft. in width over time
Bloom Time: August-October

IMG_7145

IMG_7260

 

 

 

 

Share