Spring and Summer Classes

March 17th, 2014 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Are you getting excited about warmer weather and experiencing sunlight? Finally, things are starting to grow, and green is a welcome relief from the grays and browns. There is even a smell to spring, a warm breeze carrying the scent of growing things and earth. Springtime always gets me excited about plants, and what better way to celebrate the new season than by learning a new topic!

Edible Seaweed

Browse our Spring/Summer Course catalog and see what catches your eye. Whether you are a novice gardener or an experienced horticulturist, there is a class for everyone. We offer a wide range of topics from garden design, wild sea vegetables, and summer pruning.

 

 

 

Succulent Seaweed courtesy of Melany Vorass Herarra

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Feel like getting outside, walking or discovering a new place? Join us in our continuing tour series, including Wednesday Walks, tours of the Miller Garden, a trillium garden or a lavender farm.

 

 

 

 

 

40-Ton Bed, courtesy of the Elisabeth C. Miller Botanical Garden 

 

 

 

We even have free classes, courtesy of the King County Master Gardeners. These hour -long classes contain useful tidbits of gardening information, including composting, veggie gardening, and what to do with that unsightly boulevard!

 

 

Designed by Kim Rooney, Instructor of Practical and Creative Landscape Design

 Registration is easy, go online, or call 206-685-8033 to register by phone. 

Hope to see you there!

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March 2014 Plant Profile: Stewartia sinensis

March 10th, 2014 by Soest Gardener, Riz Reyes
Photo by Mitch Evans

Photo by Mitch Evans

It may seem odd that we’re profiling a plant we currently don’t have yet at UWBG, but soon everyone will be able to see it in a very prominent spot at the Center for Urban Horticulture. After over 10 years in its place, the 2nd of two Parrotia persica (Persian Ironwood) in the Soest Garden will be removed to make room for a new tree that will take its place for the next 10 year cycle to cast part shade in Bed 2. Curation has selected the exquisite and rare Stewartia sinensis.

Many keen gardeners and horticulturists are familiar with the more common Stewartia pseudocamellia and the stunning bark of S. monodelpha. This Chinese stewartia seems to have been overlooked in the trade as descriptions state that the flowers are a hair smaller than that of S. pseudocamellia and monodelpha and the fact that it may be less hardy than the two species may also have contributed to its status as a collector’s item destined mainly for taxonomic collections.  It has the same exquisite white blooms with the yellow stamens and the trunk of this small tree is truly exceptional with pretty peeling bark and a magnificent marbling pattern as the plant ages.

Be on the lookout for this stunning species. It will be years until it casts the kind of shade the underplantings of herbaceous perennials prefer, but the eventual effect will be quite dramatic.

 

 

 

 

Common Name:  Chinese Stewartia
Location: Soest Garden Bed 2
Origin: Central China
Height and Spread: 20-25′ high x 15-20′ wide
Bloom/Fruit Time: June-July

 

 

 

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March Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

March 9th, 2014 by Pat Chinn-Sloan
Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (March 3 - 16, 2014)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (March 3 – 16, 2014)

1)   Berberis fortunei      (Chinese Mahonia)

  • Previously categorized in the genus, Mahonia
  • Characterized by narrow, serrated evergreen leaves
  • Located in the Sino-Himalayan hillside

2)   Grevillea victoriae      (Mountain Grevillea)

  • Australian shrub, growing up to four meters
  • Named for Queen Victoria
  • Located in the Pacific Connections – Australia Entry Garden

3)   Lomatia myricoides      (River Lomatia)

  • Originally placed in the genus, Embothrium
  • Specific epithet refers to foliage similar to the genus, Myrica
  • Located near the Pacific Connections – New Zealand Forest

4)   Morella californica      (California Bayberry)

  • Formerly of the genus, Myrica
  • A Pacific Coast native shrub that is well suited for borders and hedges
  • Located in the Pacific Connections – Cascadia Entry Garden

5)   Podocarpus macrophyllus      (Kusamaki)

  • Japanese conifer, sometimes referred to as Buddhist Pine
  • Known by carpenters for termite resistant wood
  • Located near the junction of the Middle Trail and Lower Trail
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A glimpse into the past: A view of Azalea Way 70 years prior

March 7th, 2014 by UWBG Communication Staff

By John A. Wott, Director Emeritus

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Azalea Way from Lake Washington Boulevard. Photo by H. G. Ihrig 1944

This view looks from Lake Washington Boulevard toward the southern end of Azalea Way. The photo was taken by H. G. Ihrig in May, 1944. It shows the opening of Arboretum Creek along Azalea Way as it flows north from the culvert under Lake Washington Boulevard. Note the large weeping willow trees as well as the large open grass path we all know as Azalea Way. The wooden bollards with the long grass growing under them are also noteworthy of the time.

On the extreme left is the entrance to East Interlaken Boulevard. The small kiosk located at the intersection was built by the Works Progress Administration crew. The kiosk was later destroyed and removed.

The intersection appears much the same today, with a few minor changes. Besides being widened, formal concrete curbs along Lake Washington Boulevard have been added.

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Slowing the Clock with Winter

March 5th, 2014 by Lisa Sanphillippo

Before we know it, it will be spring. April will be here and there will be flowers and (more) rain and leaf buds opening. We will continue on with our lives; work, school, exercise, going out and of course, gardening. Time moves on, no matter what, and it feels like it’s moving VERY quickly.

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I think I may have found a way to slow things down. Well, slowed down for an hour, anyway. I went to the Joseph A. Witt Winter Garden at Washington Park Arboretum with my camera. It was on a day we were supposed to have rain and didn’t. For the hour I was out in the field, I saw color, smelled sweet and spicy scents, felt soft and hairy flower buds, heard birds sing and declare territory and relished in the form of the naked trees. Time slowed and my senses (including my sense of wonder) took over.

If you don’t already know, the Joseph A. Witt Winter Garden is just a short distance from the parking lot near Graham Visitors Center. Walking west of the center and up the graveled ramp, you pass by one of the most fascinating trees, Malus fusca or Pacific Crabapple. This particular tree is at least as old as the Arboretum (1935) and is listed as a State Champion for it’s width. You can see in the picture below how long the side branches are.

Malus fusca

Just a little further down the trail, in the “hallway” to the Winter Garden, are two of my most favorite witch hazels. Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Diane’ not only has a beautiful flower color, but it’s fall color is also spectacular. I have seen purple, orange, red, green and yellow in one leaf.

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Directly across the trail is Hamamelis mollis, which has my favorite witch hazel fragrance and a brilliant yellow color.

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A few steps more and the the garden and all its beauty presents itself.

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A Townsend’s Warbler in Berberis ‘Arthur Menzies’ – tasting the last of the flowers. Too fast for me to get a great shot.

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The friendly and fuzzy flower buds of a star magnolia.

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The amazing and nearly unbelievable color of Cornus sanguinia ‘Midwinter Fire’.

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The shy (they don’t even lift their ‘heads’ when you walk by) and spicy sweet flowers of the Chimonanthus praecox.

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Mercy! I could go on and on. There is so much to see, smell and touch! Okay, just one more. Helleborus ‘HGC Cinnamon Snow’.

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You must come to the Joseph A. Witt Winter Garden for yourself and take the time to be fully rooted in the present. You will feel like you are suddenly living in technicolor after having been in black and white. Don't delay, soon enough we’ll be caught up in spring’s turn to blow our minds with sights and sounds.

(Top picture is a Acer griseum surrounded by two Betula albo-sinensis var. septentrionalis.
All photographs taken by Lisa Sanphillippo, UW Botanic Gardens Education Program Assistant.)

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NHS Spring Plant Sale – March 7

February 28th, 2014 by Heidi Unruh, UWBG Communications Volunteer

1912242_712998182064027_770195739_nJoin us for the Spring Ephemeral Plant Sale on March 7 with selections from  more than 20 local nurseries. Dan Hinkley will present a special lecture, “Favorite Vignettes of Spring:  Noteworthy Plant Combinations for the Pacific Northwest.” Tickets to the lecture ($5) go on sale at 8:30 am.

The sale runs from 9am – 3pm at the Center for Urban Horticulture. Proceeds from the sale benefit the Elisabeth C. Miller Library.



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2014 Urban Forest Symposium

February 24th, 2014 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Announcing the 6th Annual Urban Forest Symposium! Registration is now open for this year’s symposium, focusing on Climate Change and the Urban Forest.

Learn about the climatic changes our region can expect and strategies that can be used to plan and manage for a healthy and resilient urban forest. Presenters will discuss the expected changes to the climate, urban forest responses, and what urban foresters and advocates can do to prepare. Presentations will be relevant to urban foresters, landscape professionals, restoration ecologists, tree care professionals, consulting arborists, sustainability professionals, urban planners, landscape designers, landscape architects, municipal managers, and tree advocates.

Professional credits will be available.

Date: Wednesday, May 28, from 9am-4:30pm
Location: UW Botanic Gardens – Center for Urban Horticulture, NHS Hall
3501 NE 41st St, Seattle, WA 98105
Cost: $75 per person. Lunches available for $15.

Registration now open.

Contact: urbhort@uw.edu or 206-685-8033

Presenters include:

Greg McPhersonResearch Forester, Urban Ecosystems and Social Dynamics – Pacific Southwest Research Station, USDA Forest Service
Jim Robbins, journalist and author of The Man Who Planted Trees
Nick Bond, Washington State Climatologist and Principal Research Scientist for the UW Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean
Nancy Rottle, RLA, ASLA, Associate Professor at University of Washington and founding Director of the UW Green Futures Research and Design Lab
Tom Hinckley, Professor Emeritus, University of Washington School of Environmental and Forest Sciences
Drew Zwart, Ph.D. Plant Pathology and Physiology, Bartlett Tree Experts
Municipal representatives discussing urban forest strategies for climate change adaptation
Link to more information.

Fraxinus_pennsylvanica_'Marshalls_Seedless'

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February Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum (Part II)

February 23rd, 2014 by Pat Chinn-Sloan


“Spring Buds”


Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (February 17 - March 2, 2014)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum             (February 17 – March 2, 2014)


1)   Acer monspessulanum var. turcomanicum
Montpelier maple

  • An elegant, compact tree reaching 23-33 feet tall.
  • Suitable for warm climates and adapted to calcareous and stony soils.
  • A mature individual is growing in the Mediterranean bed along Arboretum Drive.

2)   Magnolia kobus                Kobushi Magnolia

  • Blooms in early spring and bears pleasantly fragrant white flowers.
  • Native to Japan and cultivated in temperate climates.
  • A lovely, large specimen sits in the Arboretum Magnolia Collection.

3)   Rhodondendron ‘Directeur Moerlands’
Azalea ‘Directeur Moerlands’

  • Derived from crosses between Japanese azaleas and Chinese azaleas.
  • Known for their excellent fall color and unsurpassed springs flowers.
  • Azalea Way is loaded with beautiful azaleas just ready to explode for spring.

4)   Ribes sanguineum ‘Henry Henneman’           Henry Henneman Winter Currant

  • Studded with a cap-burst of color at a botanically bereft time of year.
  • Easy to grow, well-mannered and amenable to pruning.
  • The Cascadian Entry Garden boast several cultivars of this wonderful, early blooming shrub.

5)   Sambucus racemosa              Red Elderberry

  • Grows in riparian environments, woodlands and in generally moist areas.
  • Many parts of the plant are poisonous and have been used as an emetic.
  • Native to the Pacific Northwest, elderberry bushes dot the Arboretum. Birds love the seeds.
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Campus Wedding and Special Events Fair Feb 23, 2014

February 14th, 2014 by UWBG Communication Staff
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The University of Washington Club set for a festive event.

You are invited to an exhibition of campus venues for weddings and other special events!

Sunday, February 23, 2014
12:00 pm ~ 3:00 pm

Reservations are required uwclub@uw.edu or(206) 543-0437

Meet with representatives from UW Events services, UW Botanic Gardens, The Burke Museum, The University of Washington Club, and many more!

UW Club Members, UW Faculty, Staff, and their guests are complimentary.

The University of Washington Club will be arranged for a reception to give guests a taste of what the Club offers for private events, with examples of decorations for every season. Staff from campus venues and various local wedding resources will be on hand to provide information and answer  questions about their offerings.

No weddings in your near future? No worries! This reception is the perfect opportunity to connect with local vendors and sample their wares for any kind of special event ~ anniversaries, birthdays, receptions & ceremonies of all sorts! If it’s special to you ~ we’ll make the experience unforgettable!
Come enjoy the stunning view and fun atmosphere of the UW Club, as well as complimentary appetizers and beverages!

Some of the featured vendors will include :
AA Party Rentals, Fena Flowers, Seattle’s Best Chair Covers, Mobile Celebrations, Swink Style Bar,  Planning Savvy, UW Events Services … and, of course, the exceptional catering team from The University of Washington Club!

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February Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

February 6th, 2014 by Pat Chinn-Sloan
Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (February 3 - 16, 2014)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum             (February 3 – 16, 2014)

1) Chimonanthus praecox  Wintersweet

  • With exceedingly fragrant yellow flowers borne on the bare shoots in winter, C. praecox has a suitable home here within the Witt Winter Garden.
  • Chimonanthus is the Chinese counterpart of the North American genus, Calycanthus.

2)  Lonicera standishii Winter Honeysuckle

  • A native of China, L. standishii is a perennial favorite because of its charming fragrance.
  • This specimen can be found in the Witt Winter Garden.

3)  Pieris japonica ‘Valentine’s Day’

  • Known commonly as ‘Lily of the Valley’, P. japonica is an evergreen shrub of low habit. The clustered panicles of this particular cultivar are a dark, dusky red color, giving it plenty of mid-winter attraction.
  • Located near the south end of the Lilac Collection along Azalea Way.

4)  Prunus x subhirtella ‘Rosea’

  • Native to Japan, this relatively small flowering cherry has begun to show us its rose-pink blossoms.
  • Several specimens can be found throughout the Arboretum, including one along the trail that leads from here to the Winter Garden.

5)  Viburnum specimens

  • V. farreri ‘Candidissimum’
  • V. foetens
  • V. x bodnantense ‘Deben’
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