Summer Classes at the Botanic Gardens

June 6th, 2014 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Summer is the perfect time to learn about plants. Once you are finished with your class, you can actually put your new knowledge to work, whether its learning about unusual hydrangeas to add to your landscape, maintaining your trees or shrubs, or just getting outside to enjoy a farm tour!

Register Online!

Take a look at some of our upcoming classes:

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Enjoying the wonderful scent of lavender on last years tour!

Woodinville Lavender Tour

What could be better than smelling the scent of a bouquet of lavender? Smelling 3 acres! Join Tom Frei, Master Gardener, on his lavender farm and learn a little about the uses, the care and types of lavender. There will even be lavender teas and cookies as we listen to Tom, then a tour of the 25 varieties of lavender grown there.

Here’s what people had to say about last years tour:

“I really enjoyed this session. It was gorgeous, relaxed, useful, the snacks were tasty and the store was full of things I wanted.”

“I had a thoroughly enjoyable experience just learning more about lavender. Loved discovering this new gem and will definitely be back to visit the farm in the future!”

More information…

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One of the many lovely hydrangeas from the Washington Park Arboretum

 

 

Curator Talks: Hydrangea Family

Go behind the scenes and learn about the interesting and unusual members of the Hydrangea family. Curator Ray Larsen will discuss the rare, the weird, and his favorite members of the Hydrangea family. Take notes on the handy map that will be provided, and find them on your next trip to the Arboretum!

More information…

 

 

 

Hedges are often pruned in the summer

Hedges are often pruned in the summer

 

Pruning Shrubs and Trees: The Summer Advantage

Is your garden looking overgrown? Are you unsure of how to manage it? Summer may be the best time to prune it! Learn what can and can’t be achieved through pruning in the summer with certified arborist Chris Pfeiffer. This is a 2 part class that includes a lecture and a trip to a homeowner’s residence where we will have a practical demonstration! Let us know if your garden may be a potential candidate for the field demonstration section of the class.

More information…

 

 

 

compost

The “black gold” of the gardening community.

The Hows, Whys and Uses of Kitchen & Garden Composting

Take a quick tour into the world of compost! Join Master Gardener and compost enthusiast Fred Wemer for a look into the hows, whys and what you can do with compost made from your kitchen or garden in this FREE class.

More information…

 

 

 

 

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Part of the New Zealand Garden

Wednesday Walk with John Wott: Touring the Pacific Connections Garden

 

Wouldn’t it be great if you could travel through Cascadia, Australia, China, Chile and New Zealand all in one day? In the Washington Park Arboretum’s Pacific Connections Garden, you can! In this garden, you will find amazing plants from five countries connected by the Pacific Ocean. In addition to the beautiful entry gardens, you can venture more deeply into the plantings of Cascadia and New Zealand, and learn about the ongoing progress and future plans for the newest and largest project in the Arboretum this century.

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The strange-looking Monkey Puzzle Tree

Join John Wott, Professor Emeritus and former Arboretum Director, for a new series of walking tours at the UW Botanic Gardens’ Washington Park Arboretum. Dr. Wott will discuss the history of the Arboretum, overall design, and changes over time. Throughout the year, each walk will feature plants that offer us seasonal highlights. These walks take routes that are well-suited for visitors with limited mobility.

More information…

Class dates, locations and pricing can also be found our class catalog as well as additional classes.

You can always call 206-685-8033 or email urbhort@uw.edu with questions; we are happy to answer them!

Register online!

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Stormwater Garden gets new plants

May 23rd, 2014 by Heidi Unruh, UWBG Communications Volunteer

McVay_Stairs_DesignPacific Coast Hybrid Irises, Yucca Filamentosa, and many varieties of Hebe are just a few of the plants you’ll see in the newly planted beds around the Stormwater Garden. The garden is irrigated from an underground cistern fed by roof runoff as well as from filtering and stormwater collection pools at the bottom of the garden.

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The garden is located just off the McVay courtyard at the Center for Urban Horticulture and features a solar fountain. Come check it out!

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Gabion walls allow water to drain while retaining the slope soil. Pacific coast hybrid irises are charming perennials that flower in May.


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NHS Spring Plant Sale – March 7

February 28th, 2014 by Heidi Unruh, UWBG Communications Volunteer

1912242_712998182064027_770195739_nJoin us for the Spring Ephemeral Plant Sale on March 7 with selections from  more than 20 local nurseries. Dan Hinkley will present a special lecture, “Favorite Vignettes of Spring:  Noteworthy Plant Combinations for the Pacific Northwest.” Tickets to the lecture ($5) go on sale at 8:30 am.

The sale runs from 9am – 3pm at the Center for Urban Horticulture. Proceeds from the sale benefit the Elisabeth C. Miller Library.



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A Glimpse into the past: Dedicating the Douglas Research Conservatory

January 6th, 2014 by UWBG Communication Staff

By John A. Wott, Director Emeritus

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Douglas Research Conservatory in May 1989

On June 29, 1988, the Douglas Research Conservatory was dedicated.  It was a state-of-the-art facility for plant propagation, research, and horticultural education. The facility was made possible through a one million dollar donation from the estate of the late Neva Douglas, daughter of the University’s Metropolitan Tract developer, John Francis Douglas. The gift was given in memory of Douglas and his wife, Neva Bostwick Douglas. The facility featured 5000 square feet of glass-house space and 8000 square feet for support facilities. It included a laboratory, classroom, growth chambers, storage, experimental construction spaces, and offices.

The Douglas’ son, James B. Douglas, was the developer of Northgate and many other shopping malls. He was instrumental in directing the gift, along with his son, James C. Douglas of San Diego, CA. It also show-cased innovative computer technology, which monitored and controlled vents, fans, temperatures, and other events throughout the glass houses.

The Metropolitan Tract was given to the University of Washington in 1861 and was its original site until 1895. The Tract has long been the financial heart of downtown Seattle. The Tract’s business success began in 1907. In the ensuing 20 years, the Douglas Metropolitan Building Company constructed 13 major buildings, including the White Building (1909) and the Skinner Building (1927).

The Douglas Research Conservatory was the last major building built and dedicated at the Union Bay site at the Center for Urban Horticulture.

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New Winter/Spring Courses Are Out!

January 3rd, 2014 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

 

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Our new course catalog for Winter/Spring is out and ready for registration. Whether you are a novice gardener, or an experienced horticulturist, you will find something to interest you.  Why not take up watercolor or drawing, learn to be a beekeeper, forage for your own foods, or learn about our very own seed vault right in Seattle.

 

 

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Interested in the background and stories of the Botanic Gardens? Go behind the scenes with our Curator Talks series, and discover the history of the Gardens’ most remarkable collections. Or if you feel the need to get outdoors, why not sign up for Wednesday Walks with John Wott?

 

 

 

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Maybe take a tour with the Botanic Gardens! We will be touring the Elisabeth C Miller Botanical Garden to discover spring ephemerals and taking a trillium tour at the Cottage Lake Gardens in Woodinville (where we will get tea and snacks!).

 

 

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For our professionals and advanced gardeners out there, we have the Master Pruner series,  Woody Plant Study Group, and First Detector: Pest and Disease Diagnotics. These classes focus on material relevant to professional horticulturists, and include pruning for trees, vines, and roses, woody plant selection for location and aesthetics, and pest detection, identification and monitoring.

 

 

 

flickerPlants not your thing? Local birding expert and author Connie Sidles will be doing a 4-part bird series with us this year, kicking off with Avian Tools.

 

There you have it! There really is something for everyone this year. And you can sign up for any of them by registering online, or calling 206-685-8033.

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Autumn in the Soest Garden

October 31st, 2013 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Have you ever visited the Soest Garden and wondered what kind of work goes into making it thrive year round? Join Soest Gardener Riz Reyes for a morning of hands-on instruction, fun and fall perennial care. Learn how he keeps this garden glowing even in the winter months!

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In this exclusive class, you will get down and dirty in the garden with Riz while he shares his favorite “tried and true” selections for fall interest as well as tips and techniques for keeping your own garden beautiful even in the rainiest, grayest months.

 

 

 

 

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Instructor Riz Reyes has worked at UW Botanic Gardens since 2004 and has run his own garden consultation business, RHR Horticulture, since 2003. He is a regular contributor to many local horticultural publications and also writes a monthly feature on the UW Botanic Gardens website. Earlier this year, Riz won the Founder’s Cup for Best Show Garden at the Northwest Flower & Garden Show. Recently Riz has been working in the Soest Garden at the Center for Urban Horticulture, a garden designed to help local gardeners select plants appropriate to a variety of site conditions commonly found in Pacific Northwest urban gardens.

For more information on Riz, check out his website and blog!

Participants should bring their own hand-pruners, gloves, and hori-hori soil knife, and dress for the weather.

Date: Saturday, November 9th, from 10am-12pm

Fee: Early Bird Discount: $25; $30 after November 2

Register online, or call 206-685-8033

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The Garden at Rest

October 7th, 2013 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

You may think fall and winter is a time for rest for your garden. Get prepared this fall so your garden will be supercharged come spring!

Register Online, or call 206-685-8033!

 

Putting Your Garden to Bed

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Protecting tender plants

In this FREE class taught by a Master Gardener, find out what you should do in your garden in the fall to prepare it for winter and make your garden chores easier come spring. You can help give it a gentle transition into the winter season by performing a few important tasks that will not only make the winter garden more appealing but also able to better handle the cold temperatures ahead.
By doing these simple things, your garden will be ready for winter and further ahead for next spring.

Join us on Saturday, October 26th from 10-11 to see how to put your garden to bed!

 

November Garden Tasks: Ensuring a Healthy Flower Garden Next Year

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Soest in the Fall and Spring

Join the Soest Garden gardener Riz Reyes for this hands-on workshop on fall perennial garden care.  Walk the extensively planted beds and learn about which plants to cut back now, and which ones to leave until spring.  Learn how to divide and transplant specific types of plants, and some tricks and techniques for maintenance practices that create visual appeal for the dormant season.  Riz will also share his favorite “tried and true” selections for fall interest.
Participants should bring their own hand-pruners, gloves, and hori-hori soil knife, and dress for the weather.

Join the class on Saturday, November 9th, from 10am-12pm; $25/person.

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Garden Design: Planning for Spring!

September 3rd, 2013 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Does the impending bleak weather have you feeling down? Sign up for one of our garden design classes to stay positive, and hopeful through the blah months! Learn about attracting wildlife to your yard or window, and making a safe and exciting garden for your little ones!

Wildlife Habitat Garden Design

Courtesy of Emily Bishton

Courtesy of Emily Bishton

 

Bring birds, butterflies, and bees to your yard! Learn the steps of choosing plants and features that fit your yard, and fulfill the daily needs of wildlife all the while keeping pests at bay. Whether your goal is to design a new garden or to incorporate new habitat features into an existing garden, you will enjoy this practical approach to sustainable success. Wildlife habitat gardens have kind of a beauty that plants alone cannot provide!

Bring photos of your own yard for personalized advice!

 

 

 

Child-Friendly Garden Design

Courtesy Emily Bishton

Courtesy Emily Bishton

 

 

Turn your garden into a safe and inviting place for kids. Learn to make unique places for nature exploration, and design the garden so that it “grows up” along with your child. Even learn how to involve your kids in food gardening.  Attendees should bring photos of their garden for personalized advice, and they will also receive lists of child-friendly plants and plants to avoid.

 

 

 

And as always, you can register online or call 206-685-8033 for more information

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Rain Garden Training for Professionals

August 26th, 2013 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Functional and attractive, rain gardens are becoming popular with homeowners and businesses because of the benefits they bring such as reducing water pollution and flooding and increasing property values and appeal (plus government incentives). Learn how to design and install these gardens in our upcoming 2-day workshop for professionals to tap into a new and growing customer base.

Photo Courtesy of 12,000 Rain Gardens

Photo Courtesy of 12,000 Rain Gardens

 

 2-day workshop – October 23-24
8:30a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

University of Washington Botanic Gardens, Center for Urban Horticulture
3501 NE 41st St., Seattle, WA 98105

Cost: $135; Late registration after October 16 is $150.

Draft Agenda for Rain Garden Workshop

Register Online or call 206.685.8033

 

Landscape designers, installers, and maintenance technicians are invited to take advantage of a two-day training.  This professional level training will focus on rain gardens and other low-impact development practices gaining in popularity with savvy homeowners who want to control run-off and beautify their yards.  The class will cover site selection, soils, new regulations, designs, plant selection, and more.

The demand for properly installed rain gardens is growing, creating a new niche and business opportunity for those with adequate training.  State and local programs are, or will soon be, requiring low impact development on new construction and several are offering incentives for retrofit projects.  These regulations are and will increasingly result in the creation of new jobs in the landscape industry.  The workshops will include lunch and refreshments, a copy of the new rain garden handbook, and other take-away materials.

Presented by:

UWBG logo color_small Stewardship Partners Logo WSU Extension

 

 

 

 

Photo Courtesy of 12,000 Rain Gardens

Photo Courtesy of 12,000 Rain Gardens

 

 

 

 

 

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Art in the Garden

July 29th, 2013 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Maybe you don’t have the greenest thumb. Your tomatoes refuse to ripen and your roses won’t bloom. That doesn’t mean that you can’t enjoy the botanical world. You might have to go about it a little differently! Try out one of our upcoming Garden Craft series or learn how to capture the plant world in pencil or silks.

Interested? Call 206.685.8033 with questions or register online!

Garden Craft: Potato Printmaking

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Saturday, September 7, 10am – 12pm
Early-bird discount $25; $30 after September 14

If glass isn’t your thing, try Potato Printmaking! Use potatoes (or yams, or sweet potatoes!) to create sophisticated and elegant prints for paper and cloth. Print on plain wrapping paper for a unique gift or bring a plain tablecloth to embellish. The possibilities are endless! At the very least, you will take home your own custom printed tea towel.

Botanical Drawing

Catherine Hovanic
7-part course
: Tuesdays, 7-9:30pm, starting October 1 and ending November 12
Early Bird Discount $230; $260 after September 24.

If you are looking for something a little more technical, sign up for our Botanical Drawing series of classes. With nothing but a pencil, learn to create beautiful, detailed and accurate botanical drawings. Beginners are welcome; many start with sketch an egg or a pepper, before moving onto more complicated subjects such as artichokes and coleus leaves.

 

Botanical Silks

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Saturday, November 2, 9am – 5pm
Early-bird discount $150; $175 after November 16

And finally, if you are looking for gifts for the hard to buy people in your life, why not give hand -dyed and painted silk scarves? Join local artist Linda Ann Vorobik for a day-long workshop on fabric. Learn how to make beautiful botanical designs on silk, while making your own small silk to take home.

 

Garden Craft: Hanging Glass

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Unfortunately, this class scheduled for Saturday, August 24, 2013, 9 – 11am, has been cancelled due to low registration. We plan to hold the class again in December. Please check back for scheduling updates.

Learn the basics of creating reclaimed glass art. Using nothing but glass and wire (and the occasional bead!), you can create whimsical outdoor ornaments or sun catchers that will impress your family, friends and neighbors. Class participants will be able to design and create their own small piece, while learning how to do it at home.

 

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