June Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum (Part II)

June 21st, 2013 by Pat Chinn-Sloan
Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (June 17 - 30, 2013)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum  (June 17 – 30, 2013)

1)  Callistemon sieberi            (Alpine Bottlebrush)

  • This small, spreading shrub is currently showing off its creamy-yellow flowers in bottlebrush-like spikes.
  • Native to Australia, C. sieberi can be found along the footpath of the Australian Entry Garden within the Pacific Connections Garden.

2)  Cytisus battandieri            (Pineapple Broom)

  • Sometimes referred to as Argyrocytisus, this genus of Brooms fall within the family, Fabaceae.
  • Native to Morocco, C. battandieri is an upright tree-like shrub with pineapple-scented flowers.
  • Located on the east side of Arboretum Drive in the Legumes.

3)  Liriodendron tulipfera         (Tulip Tree)

  • A member of the family Magnoliaceae, Liriodendron is a genus of two deciduous trees, L. chinense and L. tulipfera.
  • The solitary, cup-shaped flowers, inconspicuous from a distance, add interest in summer, but are not produced on young plants.
  • Located in the Magnolias, these cuttings came from a tree over 100 feet tall.

4)  Staphylea pinnata             (European Bladdernut)

  • The flowers of this upright shrub have come and gone, but it is the curious bladder-like fruit now on display.
  • Located near Azalea Way amongst the True Ashes.

5)  Tsuga sieboldii                (South Japan Hemlock)

  • Glossy, dark green foliage and smooth, dark gray bark give this tree some distinction within its genus.
  • This Tsuga can be found between the Woodland Garden and the top of Loderi Valley.
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June Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

June 10th, 2013 by Pat Chinn-Sloan
Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (June 3 - 16, 2013)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum  (June 3 – 16, 2013)

1)  Illicium henryi     (Henry’s Star Anise)

  • This Chinese Illicium is a standout of the genus, as most anise have white or cream-colored flowers.
  • I. henryi can be found along the foot path of the Sino-Himalayan Hillside as well as along the Ridgetop Trail, just west of the Magnolia Collection.

2)  Kalmia latifolia     (Mountain Laurel)

  • This under-used Rhododendron relative is native to the eastern United States.
  • The color of the closed flower buds is often completely different from the open flower color, which ranges from white to deep red, often with a distinctive band inside.
  • There are several cultivars of K. latifolia in the Woodland Garden.

3)  Leptospermum scoparium     (Manuka, New Zealand Tea Tree)

  • The bloom of manuka is profuse and long lasting.
  • Captain Cook supposedly brewed tea for his crew using manuka, which is rich in vitamin C.
  • Specimens can be found in the Australian portion of the Pacific Connections Garden.

4)  Quercus robur  ‘Concordia’     (Golden English Oak)

  • The golden color of the young growth fades to green as the leaf ages.
  • Our specimen can be seen on Azalea Way just south of the Graham Visitors Center.

5)  Rhododendron  ‘Teddy Bear’

  • This cultivar of Rhododendron is a cross between R. bureavii and R. degronianum ssp. yakushimanum.
  • The thin white indumentum on the upper side of the leaf goes away in time, while the thick indumentum of the underside remains and turns brown.
  • This Rhododendron can be found in the Puget Sound Rhododendron Hybridizers Garden along Azalea Way.
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May Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum
(Part II)

May 23rd, 2013 by Pat Chinn-Sloan

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (May 13 - 26, 2013)

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (May 13 – 26, 2013)


 
 
 
1)   Aesculus x carnea    ‘Fort McNair’

  • A hybrid between A. pavia and A. hippocastanum, it probably originated as a chance hybrid made by insects in 19th-century Germany.
  • Selected at the fort of the same name in Washington, D.C., flowers are pink with a yellow throat.
  • It can be found on Azalea Way, across from the Woodland Garden.

 
 

Close-up view of the unusual orange flowers of the Buddleja globosa

Close-up view of the unusual orange flowers of the Buddleja globosa

2)   Buddleja globosa

  • A species of flowering plant endemic to Chile and Argentina, where it grows in dry and moist forest.
  • It can be found at both ends of the Arboretum at the Holmdahl Rockery and in the Graham Visitor Center parking lot.

 

3)   Embothrium coccineum   (Chilean Fire tree)

  • A small evergreen tree from the temperate forests of Chile and Argentina.
  • The plant was introduced to Europe by William Lobb during his plant collecting expedition to the Valdivian temperate rain forests in 1845–1848. It was described by Kew Gardens thusly: “Perhaps no tree cultivated in the open air in the British Isles gives so striking and brilliant a display as this does.”
  • There are several small specimens in the Chilean Gateway, and one large one just north of the bus turnaround on Arboretum Drive.

4)  Rhododendron x  ‘Favor Major’

  • Hybridized by L. De Rothschild, the founder of Exbury Gardens in the United Kingdom.
  • A beautiful orange Azalea, located on Arboretum Drive at the Rhododendron Glen parking lots.

5)  Syringa josikaea   (Hungarian Lilac)

  • A species of lilac native to central and eastern Europe, in the Carpathian Mountains in Hungary, Romania, and western Ukraine.
  • Located in the Syringa Collection on Azalea Way, just south of the Woodland Garden.
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May Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

May 5th, 2013 by Pat Chinn-Sloan

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (April 29, 2013 - May 12, 2013)

1)   Acer circinatum (Vine maple)

  • Taken for granted around here, this time of year our vine maple is most eye-catching in flower.
  • Located throughout our native matrix as a deciduous forest understory tree.
  • Vine maple is native to the North American west coast from British Columbia to California.

2)   Acer cissifolium   (Vine-leaf maple)

  • Despite their similar common names, vine maple and vine-leaf maple could hardly be more different. The Acer cissifolium leaf is compound, composed of three leaflets; Acer circinatum has almost round leaves. The flowers of Acer cissifolium have four petals (unusual for a maple) and are arranged in racemes while those of Acer circinatum are five-petaled and in panicles.
  • Acer cissifolium is native to Japan. In the Arboretum, it is located in Rhododendron Glen (12-3E) and in the Asiatic Maples (27-B).

3)   Broussonetia kazinoki

  • The inner bark is prized in Japan for making high-quality paper.
  • A related species Broussonetia paperifera (paper mulberry) is used for paper from Myanmar to Japan and in Polynesia for the paper-like “tapa cloth”.
  • The fruit begin to develop before the flowers produce pollen.
  • Our Broussonetia is north of the Winter Garden in 35-3E and 36-2E.

4)   Rhododendron augustinii

  • Provides the mauve backdrop for the beds along Azalea Way and in Rhododendron Glen.
  • One of many plants discovered by and named for Augustine Henry in western China.

5)   Viburnum macrocephalum

  • A China native introduced by Robert Fortune in 1844.
  • Located in the Pacific Connections China Entry Garden.
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April Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum
(Part II)

April 17th, 2013 by Pat Chinn-Sloan

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (April 15 - 28, 2013)

“Now it will Spring forth!”

1)  Acer macrophyllum    (Bigleaf maple)

  • Taken for granted around here, this time of year our Bigleaf maple is most eye-catching in flower.
  • It’s the subtle texture of its expanding leaf that drew my attention.
  • Located throughout our native matrix as the dominant deciduous forest tree.

2)  Aesculus wangii

  • A horse chestnut classified as vulnerable in its native habitat of Vietnam.
  • Notice the flattened bract-like stipule of the newly-expanding leaves.
  • Our young, marginally-hardy specimen is located in Loderi Valley.
Close-up view of Kalopanax septemlobus (Prickly castor-oil tree)

Close-up view of Kalopanax septemlobus (Prickly castor-oil tree)

3)  Kalopanax septemlobus    (Prickly castor-oil tree)

  • Deciduous tree from northeast Asia known for its “tropical” appearance in full-leaf.
  • I was impressed by the size of the bud bracts and pure white indumetum of the expanding leaves.
  • This specimen is located along the eastern side of Arboretum Creek, south of Boyer Ave. East

4)  Picea meyeri    (Meyer’s spruce)

  • Spruce tree native to China, similar in appearance to Colorado Blue spruce.
  • Quite striking, springing forth new needles in combination with red male and female cones.
  • Located in the Pinetum, just west of path and south of Stone Bridge.
Close-up of the poplar, Populus sp

Close-up view of the poplar, Populus sp

5)  Populus sp

  • The detail and color contrast in the expanding leaf is awesome!
  • This poplar is unidentified in our collections, but worthy of attention.
  • Located in the Poplar Collection, south Azalea Way.



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April Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

April 6th, 2013 by Pat Chinn-Sloan

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (April 1-15, 2013)

1) Azara dentata

  • Native to temperate and subtropical Chile.
  • Bears gold spring time flowers.
  • Located in the Pacific Connections Chilean Entry Garden.

2) Liriodendron chinense

  • A smaller Chinese version of the North American native tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera).
  • Known for its unique leaf shape and tulip-shaped flower.
  • Located in the Magnolia Collection.

3) Rehderodendron macrocarpum           

  • A small deciduous tree native to China.
  • Bears white spring flowers and kiwi-shaped fruits in the fall.
  • Several specimens located along Arboretum Drive and Azalea Way.

4) Viburnum carlesii

  • Native to Korea and Japan.
  • Bears clusters of 2-3″ fragrant white flowers.
  • Located in the Viburnum Collection.

5) Viburnum bitchiuense

  • Native to Korea and Japan.
  • Very similar to V. carlesii, possibly more heat tolerant.
  • Located in the Viburnum Collection.
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March Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum
(Part II)

March 24th, 2013 by Pat Chinn-Sloan

Selected cuttings from the Pacific Connections Garden at the Washington Park Arboretum (March 18 - 31, 2013)

Pacific Connections Garden

1)  Corokia x virgata    ‘Sunsplash’

  • An odd shrub from New Zealand with variegated foliage and wiry, twisty branches.
  • This carefree evergreen tolerates some dry and looks great in containers.
  • Specimens can be found in the New Zealand Entry Garden.

2)  Grevillea victoriae

  • Fine-textured foliage, long thin flower clusters and drought tolerance make these evergreen shrubs very popular.
  • Also known as Royal Grevillea, it is endemic to parts of Victoria in Australia.
  • Several varieties of Grevillea can be found in the Australian Entry Garden.

3)  Gaultheria mucronata   ‘Rubra’ 

  • A hardy evergreen shrub with pinkish-white bell-shaped flowers followed by beautiful red berries late summer through winter.
  • Often referred to as “female prickly heath”, it needs a male plant to ensure fruiting.
  • Beautiful masses of G. mucronata can be found in the Chilean Gateway Garden.

4)  Phyllostachys dulcis

  • Sweet shoot bamboo is considered one of the best edible bamboos.
  • Large drooping leaves, thick culms and a white ring at the node make this a very beautiful bamboo.
  • A lovely drift graces the Chinese Entry Garden.

5)  Ribes sanguineum cv.

  • Flowering current is native to western coastal North America.
  • It and its varieties and cultivars are valued for their brightly-colored spring flowers and bird and habitat support.
  • Enjoy the incredible display of Ribes currently blooming in the Cascadian Entry Garden.
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March Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

March 10th, 2013 by Pat Chinn-Sloan

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (from March 4 - 17, 2013)

1)  Camellia japonica  ‘High Hat’

  • One of our earlier-flowering Japanese camellias.
  • This specimen can be found along the west side of Arboretum Drive near the construction zone detour.

2)  Pieris japonica  ‘Valentine’s Day’

  • Showing its large panicles of pink flowers.
  • Can be found on Azalea Way just south of the Lilacs.

3)  Rhododendron floribundum

  • Native to the Szechwan Province of China.
  • Specimen currently resides along the Upper Trail near the Rhododendron seedling area.

4)  Salix irrorata

  • Upright shrub with slender purple shoots and gray catkins borne before the leaves.
  • Can be found in the Witt Winter Garden.

5)  Stachyurus himalaicus

  • Native to western China and Taiwan.
  • Spreading, deciduous shrub with arching shoots and bell-shaped flowers borne in racemes in late winter.
  • Can be found on the west side of Arboretum Drive across from the double lot.
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February Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum

February 11th, 2013 by Pat Chinn-Sloan

Witt Winter Garden

Selected cuttings from the Witt Winter Garden at the Washington Park Arboretum (February 4 - 21, 2013)

1) Chimonanthus praecox           Wintersweet

  • Wintersweet is in the allspice family of Calycanthaceae.
  • The sulfur-yellow flowers are intensely fragrant and are born on bare stems.
  • This winter garden favorite is native to China.

2) Ganya x issaquahensis            Hybrid Silktassel

  • This natural hybrid, between G. elliptica and G. fremontii, is native to the western U.S.
  • The showy male catkins will soon produce large amounts of yellow pollen.

3) Hamamelis x intennedia ‘Pallida’           Hybrid Witch Hazel

  • This cultivar produces large, pale-yellow flowers on a horizontal growing form.
  • H. x intermedia is a hybrid between H. japonica and H. mollis, both native to Asia.

4) Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Winter Beauty’           Hybrid Witch Hazel

  • This cultivar, though of the same parents as ‘Pallida’, has orange flowers on a taller,
    more rounded form.

5) Salix irrorata           Bluestem Willow

  • The shoots of this upright shrub are purple with a distinct white bloom in the winter.
  • The catkins are grey when they emerge, turning red and then quickly to yellow.
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January Color Appears at the Washington Park Arboretum
(Part II)

January 28th, 2013 by Pat Chinn-Sloan

Selected cuttings from the Washington Park Arboretum (January 21 - February 3, 2013)

“Scratch and Sniff”

1)  Abies amabilis (Pacific Silver Fir)

  • Pacific Northwestern native growing up to 250 feet tall in the wild, but is often short-lived in gardens.
  • Its crushed needles smell like orange peel.
  • The easiest of the Arboretum specimens to find is on the Upper Trail below the Peony bed.

2)  Cupressus goveniana var. pygmaea (Mendocino Cypress)

  • The “pygmy” stature occurs in this tree’s native habitat: infertile ancient sand dunes above the Pacific Ocean near Mendocino. In normal soil, it can exceed 100 feet.
  • The crushed needles smell like lemon peel.
  • It is located on Arboretum Drive near the south end.

3)  Laureliopsis philippiana

  • Native to Chile and Argentina.
  • Crushed leaves smell like orange.
  • It is located in the Pacific Connections Entry Garden and on Arboretum Drive in grid  9-4E.

4)  Morella pensylvanica (Bayberry)

  • Formerly Myrica, native to the east coast of North America from Canada to Florida.
  • The fragrant, waxy berries were made into candles.
  • Located in 43-B in the Arboretum’s Oak Collection.

5)  Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas Fir)

  • For Northwesterners, this is the essential smell of Christmas in the winter and the forest in summer.  It is native to the North American west coast and self-sows freely in the Arboretum.
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