Fiddleheads Forest School Opens

September 19th, 2013 by Arboretum Education Supervisor, Patrick Mulligan

Fiddleheads_sign_UWBG

The changing hues at the Washington Park Arboretum these days signal a transition.  Many of the deciduous trees that make up our collection are booting down in preparation for winter dormancy.  Despite these seasonal changes amongst the plants, however, there is an exciting new energy in the air, one of growth and development.  The source of this vibrancy is the newest and youngest members of our UW Botanic Gardens community – the inaugural class of our Fiddleheads Forest School.

This new endeavor is designed for preschool-aged children, and aims to introduce these 3-5 year olds to the natural world in the best way possible, by immersing them in it.  In gently guiding their innate curiosity, our uber-qualified teachers, Sarah Heller & Kit Harrington, seek to promote the complete development of their students – mental, emotional, physical and social.  A lofty goal to be sure, but one we feel well-worth pursuing.  And judging by the response from the families involved, one for which there is strong desire to be met. 

Innumerable studies point towards the value of early childhood learning.  Businesses and municipalities around the country are recognizing the long-term benefits of starting kids off on the right foot and are making investments in hopes of creating a more competent and competitive work force down the road.  These “Grow Smart” initiatives can be found in states across the country and make the connection between regional economic growth and the importance of early childhood education.  It behooves organizations like ours that lean green to join this movement if we are to have any hope of achieving a more sustainable relationship with the Earth.   

Richard Louv sounded the alarm in his now seminal book, “Last Child in the Woods”, in which he coined the term “nature deficit disorder” to describe a social byproduct of the information age.  Louv pointed out that while kids and people in general become more and more plugged in to a virtual world, they simultaneously become less and less connected to the natural one.  Disconnection leads to a loss or lack of appreciation, and in the Environmental Education world, appreciation is the first step towards conservation.

Over a year in the making, we are now almost two weeks into our first year of the Fiddleheads Forest School.  We have twenty-four families who have taken this exciting plunge with us and we couldn’t be more grateful for their trust and support.  The spectacular outdoor classroom that is the UWBG Washington Park Arboretum has never felt more perfect a space than with this new application.  And we could not have found a more dynamic duo than Sarah & Kit to lead this adventure.  So two weeks in, and I’m happy to report, so far, so so good. 

Are we winning the battle in combating nature deficit disorder?  Only time will tell.  At the UW Botanic Gardens we work a lot with trees and perhaps as a result, we think like trees and take a long-term approach.  The seeds we plant today, we plant to ensure healthy forests for tomorrow.  With this mentality, we hope that when these 3-5 year olds grow up to have 3-5 year olds of their own, that outdoor schools for early learners are commonplace, and that we as a society will have had the forethought to set aside spaces like the Arboretum in which to hold them.  

Kit reads a book about emotions during story time

Kit reads a book about emotions during story time

 

Sarah unleashes bubbles that elicit shrieks of joy and fits of dancing

Sarah unleashes bubbles that elicit shrieks of joy and fits of dancing

Garden Design: Planning for Spring!

September 3rd, 2013 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Does the impending bleak weather have you feeling down? Sign up for one of our garden design classes to stay positive, and hopeful through the blah months! Learn about attracting wildlife to your yard or window, and making a safe and exciting garden for your little ones!

Wildlife Habitat Garden Design

Courtesy of Emily Bishton

Courtesy of Emily Bishton

 

Bring birds, butterflies, and bees to your yard! Learn the steps of choosing plants and features that fit your yard, and fulfill the daily needs of wildlife all the while keeping pests at bay. Whether your goal is to design a new garden or to incorporate new habitat features into an existing garden, you will enjoy this practical approach to sustainable success. Wildlife habitat gardens have kind of a beauty that plants alone cannot provide!

Bring photos of your own yard for personalized advice!

 

 

 

Child-Friendly Garden Design

Courtesy Emily Bishton

Courtesy Emily Bishton

 

 

Turn your garden into a safe and inviting place for kids. Learn to make unique places for nature exploration, and design the garden so that it “grows up” along with your child. Even learn how to involve your kids in food gardening.  Attendees should bring photos of their garden for personalized advice, and they will also receive lists of child-friendly plants and plants to avoid.

 

 

 

And as always, you can register online or call 206-685-8033 for more information

Rain Garden Training for Professionals

August 26th, 2013 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Functional and attractive, rain gardens are becoming popular with homeowners and businesses because of the benefits they bring such as reducing water pollution and flooding and increasing property values and appeal (plus government incentives). Learn how to design and install these gardens in our upcoming 2-day workshop for professionals to tap into a new and growing customer base.

Photo Courtesy of 12,000 Rain Gardens

Photo Courtesy of 12,000 Rain Gardens

 

2-day workshop – October 23-24
8:30a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

University of Washington Botanic Gardens, Center for Urban Horticulture
3501 NE 41st St., Seattle, WA 98105

Cost: $135; Late registration after October 16 is $150.

Draft Agenda for Rain Garden Workshop

Register Online or call 206.685.8033

 

Landscape designers, installers, and maintenance technicians are invited to take advantage of a two-day training.  This professional level training will focus on rain gardens and other low-impact development practices gaining in popularity with savvy homeowners who want to control run-off and beautify their yards.  The class will cover site selection, soils, new regulations, designs, plant selection, and more.

The demand for properly installed rain gardens is growing, creating a new niche and business opportunity for those with adequate training.  State and local programs are, or will soon be, requiring low impact development on new construction and several are offering incentives for retrofit projects.  These regulations are and will increasingly result in the creation of new jobs in the landscape industry.  The workshops will include lunch and refreshments, a copy of the new rain garden handbook, and other take-away materials.

Presented by:

UWBG logo color_small Stewardship Partners Logo WSU Extension

 

 

 

 

Photo Courtesy of 12,000 Rain Gardens

Photo Courtesy of 12,000 Rain Gardens

 

 

 

 

 

Art in the Garden

July 29th, 2013 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Maybe you don’t have the greenest thumb. Your tomatoes refuse to ripen and your roses won’t bloom. That doesn’t mean that you can’t enjoy the botanical world. You might have to go about it a little differently! Try out one of our upcoming Garden Craft series or learn how to capture the plant world in pencil or silks.

Interested? Call 206.685.8033 with questions or register online!

Garden Craft: Potato Printmaking

potato print
Saturday, September 7, 10am – 12pm
Early-bird discount $25; $30 after September 14

If glass isn’t your thing, try Potato Printmaking! Use potatoes (or yams, or sweet potatoes!) to create sophisticated and elegant prints for paper and cloth. Print on plain wrapping paper for a unique gift or bring a plain tablecloth to embellish. The possibilities are endless! At the very least, you will take home your own custom printed tea towel.

Botanical Drawing

Catherine Hovanic
7-part course
: Tuesdays, 7-9:30pm, starting October 1 and ending November 12
Early Bird Discount $230; $260 after September 24.

If you are looking for something a little more technical, sign up for our Botanical Drawing series of classes. With nothing but a pencil, learn to create beautiful, detailed and accurate botanical drawings. Beginners are welcome; many start with sketch an egg or a pepper, before moving onto more complicated subjects such as artichokes and coleus leaves.

 

Botanical Silks

Vorobik scarf
Saturday, November 2, 9am – 5pm
Early-bird discount $150; $175 after November 16

And finally, if you are looking for gifts for the hard to buy people in your life, why not give hand -dyed and painted silk scarves? Join local artist Linda Ann Vorobik for a day-long workshop on fabric. Learn how to make beautiful botanical designs on silk, while making your own small silk to take home.

 

Garden Craft: Hanging Glass

glass art5
Unfortunately, this class scheduled for Saturday, August 24, 2013, 9 – 11am, has been cancelled due to low registration. We plan to hold the class again in December. Please check back for scheduling updates.

Learn the basics of creating reclaimed glass art. Using nothing but glass and wire (and the occasional bead!), you can create whimsical outdoor ornaments or sun catchers that will impress your family, friends and neighbors. Class participants will be able to design and create their own small piece, while learning how to do it at home.

 

Take Back Your Backyard!

July 18th, 2013 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant
Removing Ivy on a Steep Slope

Removing Ivy on a Steep Slope

Overgrown yard got you down?

Does the dog keep getting lost in the ivy?

Are you tired of not being able to see to the end of the yard?

Learn how to take control of your unruly backyard in this Saturday class. Instructor Rodney Pond will introduce you to the invasive species commonly found in Seattle yards, and show you how to get rid of them (permanently!). In addition, you will learn about what plants will be safe to add to your backyard to return it to the oasis of peace and relaxation it once was.

Are you intimidated by the idea of working on your unruly ravine? This class will also teach home and property owners how to safely remove plants from and work on steep slopes.

Join us for Backyard Restoration!
Saturday, July 27 from 9:30am-2pm
UW Botanic Gardens, Center for Urban Horticulture, Douglas Classroom
3501 NE 41st, Seattle, WA 98195

Cost: $50; $60 after July 20th
Register Online or Call us at (206) 685-8033

 

 

Get crafty with our upcoming Garden Craft Series!

Garden Craft: Hanging Glassglass art1
Saturday, August 24, 9-11am
Cost $55; $60 after August 17

Learn how to create reclaimed glass works of art in this introductory class. Use stained glass and wire to create whimsical pieces for any garden or window and take with you not only your creation, but the knowledge of how to do it at home.

 

 

potato printGarden Craft: Potato Printmaking
Saturday, September 7, 10am-12pm
Cost: $25; $30 after August 31

Think printing with potatoes is just for kids?  Well, kids do enjoy it, but now adults can too! Learn how to print on cloth or paper with any type of potato. Cheap and elegant gifts are at your fingertips! This is an introductory class; all levels and ages are welcome.

 

 

 

Lavender Escape!

July 1st, 2013 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

It’s Lavender Season, and the flowers are in full bloom!

Beautiful blooms!

Beautiful blooms!

On July 17th, come with us and escape to the quiet beauty of Woodinville Lavender. Master Gardener Tom Frei will tell us a little about all things lavender, including history, botany, selection, care and uses.

Just sit back and take it in.

Just sit back and take it in.

 

In addition, Tom will lead us on a tour of his sustainable and organic gardens, which he and his family have been working on since 2008. To top it all off, we will relax with a refreshing lavender scented cold beverage and snack!

A delicious shortbread Lavender cookie!

Don’t those lavender cookies look good?

The cost of the tour is $20, or $25 after July 10th. Register online or call (206) 685-8033.

Space is limited, so register today!

We will meet at the Woodinville Lavender Farm, in Redmond, on July 17 at 1pm . The talk and tour will last until 2:30.

More information about the farm.

All photos courtesy of Woodinville Lavender.

A Walk in the Park

June 10th, 2013 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Come with us for a walk in the park…conscientious gardener

Join Dr. Sarah Reichard, UW Botanic Gardens Director, and author of The Conscientious Gardener, for a discussion of her book and a walk through Washington Park Arboretum.

Discover how routine gardening practices can harm both local and distant ecosystems and how you can manage your own garden to minimize detrimental effects on the environment. Learn how to sustainably and responsibly control pests, conserve water, and improve your soil.

Dr. Reichard has practical tips that will help you become a Conscientious Gardener!

Saturday, June 29, 9-11am

Cost: $15; $20 after June 22nd

UW Botanic Gardens
Washington Park Arboretum
Graham Visitors Center
2300 Arboretum Drive E, Seattle, 98112

Other upcoming classes:

Can you grow interesting plants in the shade?
Is there such a thing as too many plants?
What does a lavender farm look (and smell!) like?
What can you do to help your poor overgrown yard recover from an invasive takeover?
We can help!  We have the answers to all these questions and more. Stop in for one of our fascinating plant classes.

Register Online!
Or call (206) 685-8033 to register over the phone

 

Perennials: After the Shade

Carrie Becker showing off a private garden.

Carrie Becker showing off a private garden.

2-part class: Wednesday, June 19th, 7:00 – 8:30pm, and Saturday, June 22nd, 1:00 – 3:30pm
Cost: $50; $60 after June 16

Is your formerly sunny garden becoming shady with maturing trees and shrubs? Or do you have areas of existing shade? This class will teach you how to plant for shade and still have beautiful enduring plants from early spring through fall. Learn to love the shade!
Saturday’s class will be a field trip to a Northwest Seattle private (shady!)  garden.

UW Botanic Gardens
Center for Urban Horticulture
Douglas Classroom
3501 NE 41st St., Seattle, WA 98105

 

Summer Propagation

Wednesday, June 26, 2013, 7 – 8pm
Cost: Free!
( Pre-registration required.) Suggested donation ~$5 at the door.

There are a lot of good reasons to make more plants of the ones you already grow and love:  fill empty spots in your own garden, gift to friends, contribute to plant sales, maybe even just have cheap fun in your garden.  Whatever your reasons, this program will demonstrate a variety of techniques that can be used in early summer including division and cuttings as well as discuss materials and resources that will contribute to your success.  Join Master Gardener Kay Gordon as she shares experiences from her own garden.

UW Botanic Gardens
Center for Urban Horticulture
Douglas Classroom
3501 NE 41st St., Seattle, WA 98105

Lavender Farm Tour

Wednesday, July 17th from 1-2:30

Lavender in full bloom at the Woodinville Lavender farm.

Lavender in full bloom at the Woodinville Lavender farm.


Cost: $20; $25 after July 10

Master Gardener Tom Frei has been working with his wife and children to develop Woodinville Lavender since 2008. They are currently growing over 3000 plants and 25 varieties at a farm overlooking the Sammamish Valley.

Tom will discuss the history, botany, selection, care, and uses of lavender and lead us on a tour of the sustainable and organic gardens. Lavender refreshments will be provided. The 3rd week of July is the peak time for lavender blooms so don’t miss out on this wonderful opportunity!

Woodinville Lavender Farm
14223 Woodinville Redmond Rd NE
Redmond WA 98052

 

Backyard Restoration

Let's get rid of the ivy!

Let’s get rid of the ivy!

Saturday, July 27, 2013, 9:30am – 2pm
Cost: $50; $60 after July 20

Want to stop your yard from being swallowed up by unsightly ivy? Tired of being scratched by thorny blackberries? Join this workshop to jump start your backyard restoration efforts. Learn the common invasive species in Seattle, how to remove and dispose of them, and how to keep them from coming back. We will also touch on good plants to replace invasive species and how to work safely on steep slopes.

UW Botanic Gardens
Center for Urban Horticulture
Douglas Classroom
3501 NE 41st, Seattle, WA 98195

Get Outside this Year!

May 30th, 2013 by Sasha McGuire, Education Program Assistant

Looking to spend more time outside, but don’t know exactly what to do?

Come and learn at our upcoming classes, “Sharing Nature with Your Children”, and “Grow Your Own Organic Food”.

  Sharing Nature with Your Children

 

 

Kids enjoying a day at Mt. Rainier! Photo Credit Julie Luthy

Kids enjoying a day at Mt. Rainier! Photo Credit Julie Luthy

Do your kids complain about being bored all summer? Do they sit in front of the TV and watch shows and play video games all day? Do you wish that they would get out and explore the world, like you did as a kid?

Join naturalist Julie Luthy for a morning filled with fun activities and nature tidbits that will amaze you and your children.  A classroom introduction will be followed by a session of putting the ideas into action outside in the Arboretum, so dress for the weather and get ready for some innovative outdoor exploration.

If you’ve ever had difficulty getting your kids to hike, play or explore outside; don’t miss this!

Time: Saturday, June 8, from 9-11am
Graham Visitors Center at the Washington Park Arboretum
2300 Arboretum Drive E, Seattle, 98112

Cost: $35; $40 after June 2

Register Online
Or call (206)685-8033 to register over the phone!

 

 

 Grow Your Own Organic Food

Peas ready to go up the trellis.

Peas ready to go up the trellis.

 There is nothing better than a homegrown tomato, ripe, red and warm from the sun, sliced with some olive oil and salt on a bed of your own lettuce, in colors that you would never find at the grocery store! Does this sound delicious to you? You can make it all happen with the right knowledge.

Not only is homegrown food fresher, but you know exactly where it came from, and how it was grown. It’s cheaper than buying produce at the market too!

Take this class to learn the tricks of the trade, including using recycled materials, container and limited space gardening techniques, and urban pest control. You’ll be enjoying your harvest in no time!

Time: Saturday, June 8, from 1-3pm
Douglas Classroom at the Center for Urban Horticulture
3501 NE 41st St., Seattle, 98195

Cost: $25; $30 after June 2

Register Online
Or call (206)685-8033 to register over the phone!

Can't get much fresher than this!

Can’t get much fresher than this!

“The Life of Owls” with Paul Bannick

May 6th, 2013 by Arboretum Education Supervisor, Patrick Mulligan

Join internationally acclaimed photographer, Paul Bannick, at the Washington Park Arboretum May 10, Friday evening from 7pm-8pm for a visual and auditory exploration of the life of North American Owls. With his stunning photographs, Paul will walk us through all four seasons and all 19 species of owls while touching on their interdependence with other plants and animals.

Paul is this year’s guest speaker at Bioblitz 2013. The fee to attend is $8 per person.

Online registration is now closed. You may pay at the door with cash (exact change), check, or Visa/MaterCard.

When: May 10th 2013, 7pm – 8pm

Where: UWBG’s Washington Park Arboretum, in the Graham Visitors Center
Cost: $8 per person

Snowy__Owl_Bannick

 

Urban Forest Symposium Line-up

May 2nd, 2013 by Jessica Farmer, Adult Education Supervisor

The 5th Annual Urban Forest Symposium is just eleven days away. Take a look at the final schedule below. Please note the new end time of 4:30pm.

A limited number of seats are still available. Lunch ordering will be available until Wednesday, May 8.

Register Here

Visit http://depts.washington.edu/uwbg/news/urban-forest/ for the latest news!

2013 Urban Forest Symposium: Trees and Views
Monday, May 13, 2013

AGENDA

8:15 – 9:00   Checkin

9:00 – 9:15   Welcome and introductions
Cass Turnbull, founder of PlantAmnesty

9:15 – 10:00 The Aesthetics of Views
Kathleen Day, landscape consultant, ASLA, LEED AP BD+C, ISA Certified Arborist
Kathleen Day has more than twenty years of experience combining the art and science of landscape architecture, arboriculture and horticulture.

10:00–10:30 Break – Merrill Commons

10:30–11:15 Trees, Views, and Slope Stability
Elliott Menashe, Owner of Greenbelt Consulting
Elliott Menashe has published the standard for shore management guidance and is the originator of the “Biostructural Engineering” approach to slope stabilization, which combines structural, bio-technical and vegetative elements to restore slopes and reduce erosion.

11:15–12:00 Valuing Trees and Views
Kathleen Day, landscape consultant, ASLA, LEED AP BD+C, ISA
Lisa Ciecko, Green Cities Project Manager, Forterra
Phillip Sit, King County Department of Assessments
Bob Melvey, Assistant Manager, Windermere Real Estate NW / Inc.

12:00–12:45 Lunch – Merrill Commons.
Thank you to our lunch sponsors:  The Davey Tree Expert Company, Seattle Tree Preservation, Inc., Thundering Oak Enterprises, and Trees for Life

12:45–1:30   Views and Laws: Covenants, Ordinances and Trespass to Trees, Part I
Randall S. Stamen, Attorney
Randall S. Stamen is an attorney and an ISA Certified Arborist. He practices law throughout California and provides green industry legal services, including: the development of litigation prevention measures; the drafting of contracts; litigation representation; consulting; and, acting as a mediator and negotiator.

1:30 – 2:00   Policies and Views
Craig Salzman, Code Enforcement Officer, City of Kirkland
Dan DeWald, Natural Resource Manager for Bellevue Parks & Community Services

Mark Mead, Senior Urban Forester for Seattle Parks and Recreation

2:00 – 2:20   Break – Merrill Commons

2:20 – 3:30   Views and Laws: Covenants, Ordinances and Trespass to Trees, Part II
David Brenner, Attorney
Baker v. Olerud tree/view case in Clyde Hill. Case study and implications for the future.

Barri Kaplan Bonapart, founder of Bonapart & Associates and Bonapart Resolution, Sausalito, CA
Barri Bonapart is a nationally recognized attorney, mediator, and arbitrator with nearly three decades of experience helping people resolve tree and neighbor disputes (see www.treelaw.com and www.got-peace.com for more information).  She will explain the laws governing trespass and wrongful cutting of trees and will also discuss the use of mediation in resolving tree issues in general and view disputes in particular.

Matthew York, Assistant City Attorney, East Precinct Liaison, City of Seattle

Shawn Crowley, Law Office of Shawn Crowley LLC
Previous Staff Attorney with The Defender Association

3:30 – 4:25   Speakers Panel
Randall S. Stamen, Attorney
Barri Kaplan Bonapart, Attorney
Elliot Menashe, Owner of Greenbelt Consulting
Dan DeWald, Natural Resource Manager for Bellevue Parks & Community Services
* Other speakers will be seated in the front row and available to comment as needed.

4:25 – 4:30   Wrap-up
Cass Turnbull, founder of PlantAmnesty

 

THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS:

City of Seattle Office of Sustainability and Environment
West Seattle Garden Tour

and Our Supporters:

The Davey Tree Expert Co.
Thundering Oak Enterprises
Seattle Tree Preservation, Inc.
Windermere Ballard
SvR Design Company
Trees for Life