Winter Wrap-Up: Certainly NOT Boring…

March 29th, 2013 by UWBG Horticulturist

According to Cliff Mass, UW meteorologist, our past winter of 2012-2013 was the most “boring” on record. There were no major weather events such as wind storms, artic blasts, snowfalls in the lowlands or major flooding. This was indeed good news for the UWBG horticulture staff. Instead of spending the winter cleaning up after storms and worrying about how many plants would be affected from cold hardiness issues, we were able to focus on scheduled and planned work projects for a seasonal change of pace.  Here’s a rundown of several of these projects we were able to accomplish during this most boring winter.

Reclaimed View of Azalea Way from Lookout

Reclaimed View of Azalea Way from Lookout

An adjunct to the current Pacific Connections Garden – New Zealand construction work was taking on the long overdue renovation of the Lookout rockery and reclaiming the lost vistas from the Lookout viewpoints. Arguably the most interesting rock work in the arboretum, the rockery was essentially lost under overgrown plant collections. The crew certainly wasn’t bored with the thought of what new and exciting discoveries lay under the next pruning cut. When the Lookout gazebo reopens to the public, visitors will be able to see the pond and Azalea Way from inside the newly restored structure and experience the original 1941 design intent. In other words, the Lookout is once again a lookout. Also, check out the new  Rhododendron species planted along the Lookout trail in honor of Ben and Margaret Hall’s 80th birthdays. They are major supporters and donors of UW Botanic Gardens.

Raoulia australis close-up

Raoulia australis close-up

McVay Courtyard  Raoulia australis grndcvr

McVay Courtyard
Raoulia australis grndcvr

The McVay Courtyard renovation is mostly completed now thanks to Riz and Annie and contains many new additions. The original designer, Iain Robertson,  specified renewing the 3 distinct plant groups: Bulbs, Groundcovers and Shrubs. The existing grove of Acer palmatum ‘Aconitifolium’ which were carefully worked around and a few Osmanthus are all that remain of the original tree and shrub palette  Iain’s new design incorporates elements of interesting plant architecture, habits and striking bark. Hence his use of several types of Arctostaphylus, the unusual divaricating shrub, Corokia, Rhododendron moupinense, Rh schlippenbachii, and several tidy groundcovers that mimic inanimate forms, such as Raoulia and  Bolax. For the bulk of color, Iain chose a wide-range of spring and summer flowering bulbs.  Though the garden looks a bit austere at the moment, as any newly planted landscape does, we’re looking forward to a quick and healthy establishment and growth period this spring and summer. For those that miss the striking habit of the Nolinia, no need to panic, they were successfully transplanted  to the adjacent cistern slope and new stairs  to the south.
Washington Park Arboretum is once again a UW-Restoration Ecology Network capstone site. The student group known as the “A-Team” has designed a weir system in the north “wet” zone of the holly collection. They will be continuing construction and planting this spring. Ryan and company decided it’s better to flow with nature rather than fight it. This new feature will, over time, become a healthy wetland area and will immediately reduce both UWBG and City Parks maintenance input, i.e., mowing and weed control.

"A-Team" installing weirs

“A-Team” installing weirs

The Winter Garden was in showcase form as it should be during the winter. Roy has been busy procuring new plants primarily for the new drainage area in the SE quadrant of the garden. We’re looking forward to having an updated brochure and map next winter. There’s still time to catch some of the late winter, early spring flowering plants such as Corylopsis and Magnolia.
Gardeners, Rhett and Preston, took on the tatty northeastern most corner of Rhododendron Glen. Pruning out several years worth of Rhododendron rootstock growth and removing deadwood in the grove, removal of several poor or dead specimens, and lots of sheet mulching! Wow, I’ve never seen it so good and I’ve been around these parts a long time.

Chris and Darrin spent several days up at the double parking lot along the Broadmoor fence tackling deferred storm damage cleanup and improving view corridors. I would expect ne’erdowells will think twice about using this area for their dirty deeds for quite some time.

Adding soil to Chilean Gateway via conveyor belt system along LWBlvd


Adding soil to Chilean Gateway via conveyor belt system along LWBlvd

The Lake Washington Blvd curbside area along the Chilean Gateway is vastly improved as a result of over 120 yards of new soil  brought in to create “fingers” at the toe of the slope. This new design will hopefully deter pedestrians from walking through the Gateway and stepping on our plants. Also, with improved drainage, we now can grow Elymus magellanicus without drowning its roots. There are also several new Chilean taxa planted throughout the Gateway that over time as they get bigger will create that Wow! sensation, either up close or from a distance. They include: Gunnera magellanica, Ourisia coccinea, Mitraria coccinea to name a few.

Will spring be as boring too? The UWBG horticulture staff certainly hopes so.

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Building the New Zealand Forest, Pacific Connections Update

March 11th, 2013 by UWBG Horticulturist

The 2.5 acre New Zealand  forest construction project is scheduled to be completed by the end of June.  W.S. Contractors LLC  is currently finishing up infrastructure details, including the future bus turnaround and toilet area located across Arboretum Drive from the NZ  forest in the future Australia exhibit. Irrigation system installation will begin later this month through May. Planting will begin in June. There will be approximately 10,000 total plants representing over 90 taxa for the 9 plant communities that will be represented.  Garden dedications have been tentatively set for September 13 and 14.

In tandem with the 2.5 acre NZ focal forest project, the Lake Washington Blvd street lighting upgrade through WPA is completed. The Olmsted inspired lamps installed with modern LED bulbs is a huge aesthetic and vehicular safety improvement.   Also, the lower section of the Chilean Gateway re-do will be wrapping up with new plantings in the coming weeks. Our goal for the lower Chilean Gateway is to make it uninviting for pedestrians to walk curbside and trample our plants. We accomplished this by creating raised “fingers” and small berms close to the curb by adding over 120 yards of soil amendment. The well-draining soil-mix will also provide much better growing conditions for the Chilean blue wheatgrass, Elymus megellanicus, than before.

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Cash donation helps vandalized garden recover

May 10th, 2012 by Tech Librarian, Tracy Mehlin

In early May UWBG suffered a sever vandalism attack of  in the Gateway to Chile garden. This follows similar vandalism last May in the same location and in some cases, the same plants.  KOMO news covered the story with an interview with the Manager of Horticulture, David Zuckerman:

 

Yesterday Director Sarah Reichard received a call from a private banker representing an anonymous donor and by late yesterday UWBG had a check to cover the estimated costs to replace plants and repair the damages – $43,000!

Director Reichard reassured staff in an email announcing the donation that the investigation continues:

“This does not mean we will not continue to assist the police to track down the guilty parties but I hope you feel – as I do – that your faith in human nature at least a little bit restored.”

Seattle Parks and Recreation, the Arboretum Foundation, and the UW Botanic Gardens ask anyone with information about the crime to contact the Seattle Police Department’s East Burglary Unit at 206-684-4300

Donations can be made through the University of Washington Foundation.


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Chile Tour 2011: Exciting Days in the Lake District

January 25th, 2011 by Sarah Reichard
Araucaria forest in Chile by S. Reichard

Monkey puzzle trees frame Volcan Lanin

Auracaria! Embothrium! Drimys! Oh my! We have had exciting few days in the Lake District, seeing old friends from our gardens and being captivated by new ones. We arrived in the area and nearly immediately went into the Andes to see Auracaria auracana in the wild. While this species brings both love and hate in Seattle, including among our group, everyone agreed it looked splendid in the wild, silhouetted against Volcan Lanín. We also did a short hike in the area, seeing lots of Alstroemeria aurantiaca (a weed here, though native) and Mutsia spinosa. Embothrium coccineum was flowering too.

Araucaria photo by S. Reichard

Nita Jo Rountree and Shelagh Tucker take photos of Susie and Jennifer Marglin

Yesterday we did a fantastic hike most of the day in a private conservation area that is designed to preserve Aextoxicon punctatum, a rare tree that almost does not exist in the wild because of its harvest for wood. The Valdivian rain forest here was really exciting and we raced from plant to plant exclaiming over the Luma apiculata, the ferns both huge and tiny, and sweet-smelling Myrceugenia. As we walked, we spotted the orange flowers of Mitraria coccinea on the path – this epiphyte was up high and we mostly saw it this way. I grow it in-ground in Seattle and it does VERY well for me. The forest was thick with vines of the Chilean national flower, Lapageria rosea, which may be my very favorite flower of all time. I grow it in Seattle and cherish the flowers, though it may be hard to grow in the colder parts of our area. Sadly, we were about six weeks too early to see it flower, though if all those vines had been dripping in flowers, you would probably never see us again. This hike would have been outstanding for the fabulous forest, but the fact that it was also set among the spectacular scenery along the Pacific Ocean did not hurt.

fitzroya photo by S. Reichard

Fitzroya cupressoides (alerce) is related to our native western red cedar and is considered rare due to overharvest

We also did a hike in Lahuen Nadi Park, which is set aside to protect Fitzroya cupressoides (alerce) another tall tree now rare because of over-harvest. This forest was also a humid forest, but very different from the other. The underbrush was thick with native bamboos (Chusquea species) and some of my beloved Drimys winteri. Lapageria relative Philesia magellanica was just opening here (Dan impishly tucked one behind his ear and tried to convince me that it was Lapageria – he had me going for about 2 seconds). It is similar to Lagageria, but smaller and less deeply colored. We also saw the wonderful flowers of Desfontainia spinosa, another favorite of mine, though only very high up. These flowers look like orange candy corns dangling from branches with holly-like leaves. I grow this in Seattle, but have not gotten it to flower and recently my mountain beavers attacked it, so I don’t know if I will ever get it to flower.

Philesia magellanica photo by S. Reichard

Philesia magellanica is a beautiful shrub that grows both in the ground and as an epiphyte

Herbarium in Santiago photo by S. Reichard

Children working the vegetable gardens of Herbarium, near Santiago

I would be remiss if I did not recount our last day in the north as well. We visited an inspirational place near Santiago called “Herbarium” which has nothing to do with herbaria such as our Hyde Herbarium. Instead, they focus on horticultural therapy and the use of plants to heal those with physical and mental problems. Perhaps most important, they work with kids 3-14 that are from families with problems. Somewhat similar to Seattle Youth Garden Works, a collaboration we share with Seattle Tilth and work with at-risk teenagers, this program provides children with healing and learning.

Wine tasting photo by S. Reichard

Our group tastes wines at the De Martino winery

We also spent time in the wine country, especially at a winery called De Martino. We had probably the best wine making tour I have ever had and then tasted three wines. The signature wine of Chile is the Carménère. The story is fascinating. The vines have been grown as merlot for years, about 15 years ago a French viticulturist was visiting and recognized it as different. DNA testing showed it was a different variety and now it is a very popular red wine.

We have been blessed with absolutely spectacular weather – crazy good, actually. Here in the Lake District it has been sunny and just perfect for hiking – warm, but not so hot that you overheat as you hike. I hope this continues the rest of our trip!

photo by S. Reichard

The new Chilean miners emerge! From left, Mary Palmer, Joanne White, Susie Marglin, Jennifer Marglin, Denise Lane, and Debby Riehl stand in a soil pit at the De Martino winery. The pit is used to monitor roots and water movement subsurface.

 

photo of hikers in Chile by S. Rechard

Our group of hikers in the coastal forest preserve for Aextoxicon punctatum, a tree edenmic to the Valdivian rain forests.

Tomorrow we head south for our final, and perhaps most exciting adventure – a visit to Torres del Paine National Park. None of us, including Dan or me, have been there before. Dan and I had to bear keeping a terrible secret from the group for a few days – when we first got here there was civil unrest over an increase in the cost of natural gas and tourism to the Park was blocked! It was resolved a few days ago and the adventure is on!

I hope you  guys are all good.

Sarah

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Chile Tour 2011: Wowed by the amazing gardens

January 19th, 2011 by Sarah Reichard

Wow! No wait, that is not good enough. WOW! No, still not enough. WOWWOWWOWWOW!!!! We saw some amazing gardens designed by Juan Grimm, a Chilean architect who has designed over 300 fabulous gardens. On Monday night he gave us a talk about his design philosophy and showed many photos. His philosophy would fit into Seattle very well. He believes the garden should fit into the existing landscape and, while he uses non-native plants, he also uses natives, but arranges them as a garden. He integrates the house and the garden together. At that point, as I was writing (“like Windcliff” – Dan Hinkley’s home and garden – into my notes, Mary Palmer leaned over to me and whispered “like Windcliff!”). Señor Grimm also believes that the existing conditions should be taken into account and gardens formed around them. At one garden he designed there was hardpan. Rather than fight that, he created a garden with ephemeral ponds.

Grimm pool photo

The pool at Juan Grimm´s house

The first garden we saw with Señor Grimm was one he started designing in 1984 for Pedro Tomas Allende (yes, related to the famous Chilean Allende family). This 20 acre garden was a delight! Agapanthus, with flower heads as big as humans, with orange daylilies behind, with an overstory of palms native to Uruguay. The gardens went on and on, with beds of Clivia, an aviary, and so much more the mind reels. I am not a huge hydrangea fan, but behind his house he has a large pond and at the far side is a sweep of pink mophead hydrangeas that were gorgeous!

Allende - hydrangea photo

Hydrangeas, as viewed from Senor Allende's house

Allende garden photo

This is the entry to the Allende garden, with an overstory of palms from Uruguay and Agapanthus with flower heads the size of human heads!

In front of his house, leading to the main garden, there were stairs that were topped in grass that one ascended from a patio that had pavers of fossilized wood. The same pavers were repeated, polished, in the home. Señor Allende was very gracious and served us refreshments on his patio overlooking the pond.

The second garden was that of Tomas Muller, who is currently the Chilean ambassador to the United Kingdom. This is a very modern house, perched on a cliff above the Pacific Ocean. We were also able to tour the house, which features fabulous art by Chileans, along with the fantastic view and gardens. Here, he has created a very naturalistic garden, again with a mixture of natives accented with interesting non-natives, that blends into the native landscape beyond.

Muller garden photo

Jim Heg climbs the rocks at the Muller Garden

The last garden we saw was his own, again perched on a cliff above the sea, a bit too close for comfort for those of us with a healthy fear of heights. In fact, the deck off the master bedroom was literally perched at the edge of a steep cliff, with no railing at all. Not a house for children, pets, night-walkers, or partiers! But the house was again beautifully integrated into the landscape, with a pool at the edge of the cliff.

Grimm garden phots

The view from Juan Grimm´s bedroom balcony is beautiful, but the drop is steep and there is no rail, so be careful!

Besides gardens, we also visited some Chilean wine palms (Jubaea chilensis) near the national park set aside for them. We planted a few of these in the new Gateway to Chile garden in the Washington Park Arboretum last fall. These were huge and I am excited about the potential for our new display in the garden.

The group learns more about the Chilean wine palm (Jubaea chilensis), a rare palm that is included in the Arboretum´s new Gateway to Chile display

wine palm fruit photo

One of the reasons the wine palm is so rare is because the large fruits are a favorite food, so not enough young plants are regenerating

We have been enjoying wonderful food, especially seafood. Two and three hour lunches and dinners with multiple courses are common and we are all feeling a bit snug in our clothes. Fortunately, next week will involve much more hiking and hopefully we will work it off. Our group has also discovered pisco sours, a delicious blend of the clear brandy that Chileans are very proud of, with lemons, a bit of sugar, and a dash of bitters. They go down a little too easily! We have also been enjoying the excellent Chilean wines at lunch and dinner. Chileans certainly know how to live the good life!

tour group photo

We enjoy one of several leisurely lunches

But lest you think we have just been imbibing, we have also been enjoying the excellent fruit juices. This morning I had melon and peach juices (separately, not mixed) and they were amazing. We have also sampled raspberry and strawberry juices. Why don’t we have these wonderful fresh juices in the States?

Speaking of wine, tomorrow we tour the wine country and visit some of the oldest wineries in the country. We will cap the evening off with a dinner followed by traditional Chilean dancing, as we had at the dedication to the Gateway to Chile celebration last fall. On the 21st we are off to the Lake District and a whole new set of adventures.

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Chile news is good news!

October 21st, 2010 by Jennifer Youngman, Communications Specialist

Monkey Puzzle tree photo“Uno, dos, tres, cut!” cried Paige Miller, the Arboretum Foundation’s executive director. Armed with garden shears, dignitaries clipped the bamboo ribbon, officially opening the Gateway to Chile in Washington Park Arboretum’s Pacific Connections Garden. Bathed in sunshine, and on the heels of the Chilean miners’ safe return above ground, the Oct. 17 Gateway to Chile celebration was triply joyous. Watch a 2 1/4-minute video.

Can’t wait until the monkey puzzle trees and other fascinating plants mature so you can stand immersed in a Chilean forest? Join Dr. Sarah Reichard, professor at UW Botanic Gardens, and Plantsman Dan Hinkley for a breathtaking tour of Chile’s national botanical gardens, parks, nurseries and private estate gardens Jan. 15-30, 2011.

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