Tree Removal Notice

August 10th, 2010 by UWBG Horticulturist

WPA TREE REMOVAL NOTIFICATION UPDATE:

PINE REMOVAL SCHEDULED FOR YESTERDAY, 8/19/10,  HAS BEEN POSTPONED UNTIL SEPT. 2nd, THUR., DUE TO EQUIPMENT NEED: BUCKET TRUCK.

UWBG tree crew has scheduled the removal of a large standing dead pine collection for Wed. 8/18 and/or Thur. 8/19. Vitals below:

Pinus sylvestris

UW Accession: X-72

Grid 4S-8E

DBH 11.8

Location: Madison Strip

Notes: Standing dead, in decline for several years, oozing pitch near base, possibly caused by boring insects

Wood will be hauled and stump ground ASAP to minimize attracting pine pests.

Targets include:  Street – Washington Place. Trail – S. entry pedestrian path. Other – Plant collections

Temporary road and trail closures and/or detours will be well marked at the site and removal posted at the Graham Visitors center and UWBG website.  Thank you for your cooperation.

If you have any questions, pls contact me via e-mail or phone number below.

David Zuckerman

Horticulturist

UW Botanic Gardens

VM 206.543.8008

FX   206.616.2971

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Tree Removal Notice

August 3rd, 2010 by UWBG Horticulturist

ARBORETUM TREE REMOVAL NOTICE –

UWBG tree crew has scheduled the removal of a large standing dead pine collection for Wed. 8/4.  Details below:

Pinus strobus 977-97-E

Grid 35-4W

26″ DBH

Tree has been in decline for several years, possibly due to drainage problems and/or root rot.

Wood will be hauled and stump ground ASAP to minimize attracting pine pests.

Targets include Pinetum Loop trail and other and other plant collections.

Temporary road and trail closures and/or detours will be well marked at the site and removal posted at the Graham Visitors center. Thank you for your cooperation.

If you have any questions, please contact me via e-mail or phone number below.

David Zuckerman, UWBG Horticulture Supervisor,  206-543-8008

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Invasive Garden Loosestrife Spraying to Restart

July 29th, 2010 by UWBG Horticulturist

Lysimachia vulgaris imageFor a second year, Northwest Aquatic Eco-Systems along with UW Botanic Garden will begin spray work to control Lysimachia vulgaris (garden loosestrife), a state-listed noxious weed occurring along Union Bay shorelines including the Union Bay Natural Area and the Arboretum’s Foster and Marsh Islands the first week of August.  King County requires control of this aggressive and invasive weed, which poses a serious threat to the native character of area wetlands. In 2009, DoE provided a 5-year grant for $75,000 to fund loosestrife control.

In mid-July members of King County’s Noxious Weed Control Program and UW Botanic Gardens staff mapped the extent of the weed in the areas listed above.  Comparison of the maps from year 1 to year 2 demonstrated slight control had taken place.  Once again the weed will be controlled with an aquatically approved herbicide by the contractor, Northwest Aquatic Eco-Systems using airboats and other specialized equipment.

King County Garden Loosestrife Fact Sheet

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What’s the story of Herb Robert at the Arboretum?

July 16th, 2010 by UWBG Horticulturist

On July 14 a UWBG Facebook fan asked us what’s the story of Herb Robert at the Arboretum. UWBG Horticulturalist, David Zuckerman, replies with background information and his personal experience with this stinky weed.

Herb Robert, aka, Stinking Robert. Geranium robertianum is an escaped ornamental herbaceous perennial native to Europe. It has quite a history of folklore and medicinal uses. It is a class B noxious weed in Washington(1998?) and first seen in our state in 1911, Klickitat. Due to its ubiquitous nature in King County, control is currently not required. King County Noxious Weed board strongly encourages and recommends control and containment of existing populations and discourages new plantings.

Personally, my encounters and observations of Bob in the arboretum from 1982 to present:

Started innocently enough as a lovely, cute little scented geranium  and quickly spread into our most troublesome forest shade herbaceous monster in the ‘80s and ‘90s. Now, due to a vigorous weed control program, we have actually reduced its seed bank (from whence it spreads by catapulting tiny black seeds that attach themselves on a filament on the undersides of our Rhododendrons and other forest plant collections and natives).  After hand pulling this weed for many a year, it is NOT recommended to leave one’s gloves hanging indoors to dry out, for the following day you will be hit by a most obnoxious odor reminiscent of the worst possible case of sock and shoe malodorous!

Want to join the fight against invasive weeds in the Arboretum? Volunteer as a Gardener Assistant – we could use your help!

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Two Red Oaks Topple in Arboretum

June 24th, 2010 by UWBG Horticulturist

Root wad of fallen red oak in west lagoon

Two leaning mature red oaks (Quercus rubra) fell last week in the arboretum. The one that went down at the north end of Azalea Way, near our famous propped Willow oak, was witnessed by several onlookers as our arborist Chris Watson was hurredly trying to stablize it from going over. He never had a chance. The popping and cracking noises from severing roots on the backside kept getting louder and more frequent. It was sad and awesome at the same time. Not many people get to see a large tree go down on its own volition.  The other oak is located at the water’s edge in the west lagoon area. This oak was significant from a curation standpoint too.  It was wild-collected in the Adirondacks in 1958 by the Morton arboretum. Arboretum staff hope to keep its massive root wad (see photo) intact for interpretive and educational opportunities.  Both oaks were leaning and growing in shallow soils, had insufficient support roots, extraordinary spring growth and wet, heavy foliage when they failed. The fact that there were two trees of the same species topple  at approximately the same time was indeed a rare coincidence in the arboretum.

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Pacific Connections – “Chilean Gateway” Notice

March 26th, 2010 by UWBG Horticulturist

Upcoming Pacific Connections Phase 2 Construction

33 trees will be removed under the Pacific Connections Phase 2 Project. These trees do not contribute to the horticultural collection.  They are being removed as a management tool and to make way for the new Chilean garden.

Location: Pacific Connections Garden – Chilean Immersion Forest NE quadrant of intersection of Lake  Washington Blvd. and Arboretum Drive.

Timeframe: April 19 -23, 2010

Safety: Service roads and trails near tree removal operations will be clearly signed “Closed” for  this removal and a detour will be set up to route pedestrians around the removal.

Contact: Andy Sheffer, Seattle Parks and Recreation, for  additional information. andy.sheffer@seattle.gov or 206.684.7041

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WPA Coming Attraction: Mason Bee Boxes

February 19th, 2010 by UWBG Horticulturist

Mason Bee Box

Arboretum staff will be assisting mason bee hobbyist Dave Richards (JohnnyAppleBeez, LLC) install several mason bee boxes in trees throughout the Arboretum grounds. The gentle, native mason bee is a better pollinator than the honeybee, but doesn’t travel nearly as far from its nest. Boxes will be up until June. An interpretive sign about mason bees will soon be posted up at the Arboretum apiary.

8 boxes similar to the one in the photo will be installed throughout the Arboretum grounds

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J.A. Witt Winter Garden: SE Bed Renovations

February 18th, 2010 by UWBG Horticulturist

The UWBG horticultural crew will be making renovations to the southeast bed, which will include removing, relocating, or protecting other UW plant collections in the project area, followed by regrading of the bed and soil remediation. The 2009-2010 fall and winter planting of new winter-interest trees, shrubs, and ground covers will also take place.

This project will reclaim over 5,000 sq. ft. of bed space that is now detrimentally shaded by elm trees. It will also renew UW Landscape Architecture Professor Iain Robertson’s original 1987 Winter Garden design intent.

This renovation was made possible by a gift from the Arboretum Foundation, which was given to them from Lake Washington Garden Club, Unit 3.

Renovation information sheet.

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