The Science and Practice of Sustainable Sites

August 26th, 2011 by Tech Librarian, Tracy Mehlin

Three stand-alone Tuesday evening sessions: 6:30–8:30pm at CUH, September 20; September 27; October 4.

$30 per event; $50 for two; $75 for three, with an additional 10% early-bird discount by EOB September 9.

Approved for Landscape Architecture Continuing Education System (LACES) credits.

Register online, call 206-685-8033 with a credit card, or mail in this downloadable registration form.

———————————

Tuesday, September 20

“The Science and Practice of Sustainable Sites: Observations from Two Parks Pilot Projects”

6:30 – 8:30 pm, 2.0 LACES PDH

This session will compare and contrast how the SITES™ process applies to two Seattle Parks e

Bradner Park Fence image

Bradner Park Fence

nrolled in the Sustainable Sites (SITES) Initiative’s Pilot Program: Bradner Gardens Park, an existing park; and Kirke Park, a park in development. Participants will gain an understanding of the application of SITES to different project types as project-team leads share their experiences with SITES and compare notes on their decision-making and documentation processes. Team members will review how they determined the appropriate credits, show sample documentation from credit requirements, and speculate on possible lessons learned from the process. The event will conclude with a lively dialog about how SITES may influence Seattle Parks’ design, operations, maintenance, and marketing, and conversely how the pilot projects may inform SITES standards. This training is intended for design professionals, site owners, and landscape contractors who want to learn how to effectively contribute to the team-oriented process of creating and documenting sustainable landscapes.

“Observations from Two Parks Pilot Projects” is a standalone course in an evening series exploring the Sustainable Sites Initiative and the sustainable practices that will enable built landscapes to support ecological functions and regenerate natural resources. We examine the SITES metric and its use as a tool to effect change through the lens of our instructors’ experiences with SITES pilot projects and other performance-based tools. This series is co-sponsored by UW Botanic Gardens, the Washington Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (WASLA) and Seattle Public Utilities.

Karen Galt is a landscape architect and coordinates the Irrigation Conservation Program for the Stewardship and Sustainability Unit of Seattle Parks and Recreation. For nearly twelve years Karen has worked for Parks in neighborhood planning and park development; her work has recently focused on maintenance operations.

Clayton Beaudoin, MLA, LEED AP®. With a background in the environmental community, Clayton’s landscape-architecture experience includes several LEED certified buildings, creek daylighting, neighborhood development, and several regional and neighborhood parks.

 

Tuesday, September 27

“The Science and Practice of Sustainable Sites: Practical Implementation of Soil Protection”

6:30 – 8:30 pm, 2.0 LACES PDH

Effective soil protection starts early in planning and doesn’t stop with best intentions. This seminar will prepare design, construction and landscape professionals to meet the Sustainable Sites (SITES™) Initiative’s soil benchmarks as well as Washington’s required Post-Construction Soil Best Management Practices, which the SITES requirements are modeled on. After an introduction to soil functions and ecosystems, we’ll discuss best practices in soil protection and restoration, the soil management plan, materials selection, and writing effective specifications. We’ll discuss construction strategies for both large and small sites — sequencing, equipment and coordinating on-site teams, as well as ongoing practices for soil regeneration.

“Practical Implementation of Soil Protection” is a standalone course in an evening series exploring the Sustainable Sites Initiative and the sustainable practices that will enable built landscapes to support ecological functions and regenerate natural resources. We examine the SITES metric and its use as a tool to effect change through the lens of our instructors’ experiences with SITES pilot projects and other performance-based tools. This series is co-sponsored by UW Botanic Gardens, the Washington Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (WASLA) and Seattle Public Utilities.

David McDonald is a resource conservation planner at Seattle Public Utilities, leads SPU’s professional training program and Washington’s Soils for Salmon project, and serves on the national SITES technical core committee.

Howard Stenn is a design consultant and co-author of Washington State’s Soil BMPs with extensive site development, specification, and soil best practice professional education experience.

Jim Berger is Senior Construction Manager at Port Blakely Communities, teaches CESCL erosion courses, and coordinates construction teams and installation processes. He shares with our other presenters a keen interest in sustainability and soil.

 

Tuesday, October 4

 “The Science and Practice of Sustainable Sites: Watering without Waste”

6:30 – 8:30 pm, 2.0 LACES PDH

Resource-savvy irrigation is more than a technical skill; it requires the communication, forethought and systems thinking of an integrated team. This two-hour session will provide an irrigation technical overview and prepare professionals for the requirements of the Sustainable Sites Initiative (SITES™). The instructors lead you through the water conservation prerequisites and credits, as well as strategic approaches that support SITES’ multiple objectives. Planning for plant establishment, life-cycle and ongoing maintenance involves good communication and documentation. We’ll explore irrigation efficiency, materials, the influence of maintenance on design, the appropriate use of drip systems and temporary irrigation, and weaning off supplemental water. We’ll tap into the experience of our instructors, including a SITES pilot project that looks ahead to disconnection.

“Watering without Waste” is a standalone course in an evening series exploring the Sustainable Sites Initiative and the sustainable practices that will enable built landscapes to support ecological functions and regenerate natural resources. We examine the SITES metric and its use as a tool to effect change through the lens of our instructors’ experiences with SITES pilot projects and other performance-based tools. This series is co-sponsored by UW Botanic Gardens, the Washington Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (WASLA) and Seattle Public Utilities.

David Hilgers, ASLA, LEED AP®, works for R Miller Construction as a landscape architect and sustainability advisor, and integrates sustainable design and construction practice in all types of development.

Matt Suhadolnik, ASLA, LEED AP®, is a landscape architect with SvR Design, where he collaborates with other engineering, landscape architecture, and planning professions on well integrated, sustainable solutions.

Share

Call for Abstracts: Conserving Plant Biodiversity

August 4th, 2011 by Wendy Gibble
 arctic alpine forget-me-not

Arctic alpine forget-me-not, Ertrichiumnanumvar elongatum

The University of Washington Botanic Gardens will be hosting a conference next March, on Conserving Plant Biodiversity in a Changing World: A View from NW North America. Complete  information is on the conference website, including program themes, sponsorship opportunities and a call for entries for a botanical art competition.

The call for abstracts will be open until October 28th.

Note that we define change as not just climate, but also economic and political change.

Share

Aquatic Weed Symposium – July 13, 2011

June 7th, 2011 by UWBG Horticulturist

A loosestrife by any other name. . .

If you have trouble remembering this plant’s name, you might try thinking of the strife it has let loose on our wetlands.

In 2009, the Department of Ecology awarded the UW Botanic Gardens a 5-year grant for the control of garden loosestrife (Lysimachia vulgaris), a class B noxious weed mandated for control by the King County Noxious Weed Control Board. Now we’re hosting a symposium featuring the latest observations and expertise on aquatic weed management.

In his keynote address, Steve Manning, founder and president of Invasive Plant Control, Inc., will present economically and environmentally sound techniques for controlling invasive aquatic weeds. You’ll also hear from King County Noxious Weed Specialist Katie Messick and representatives from the UW Botanic Gardens and Seattle Parks Department. The afternoon will be devoted to a kayak or walking tour (your choice) through Lake Washington’s wetlands, one of garden loosestrife’s primary haunts in this region.

Designed for professional audiences, this symposium is open to everyone interested in aquatic weeds and their control.

Managing Aquatic Weeds: Challenges and Opportunities
Wednesday, July 13, 9:00 AM-3:30 PM
Graham Visitors Center, Washington Park Arboretum, 2300 Arboretum Dr. E, Seattle
Professional Credits: WSDA, WSNLA (pending)
Symposium with Kayak Tour, $55; Symposium with Walking Tour, $30
Box lunch included when you register by July 10: 206-685-8033 or online

Share

Science, Services and Performance of Sustainable Sites

April 15th, 2011 by Tech Librarian, Tracy Mehlin

Date: Wednesday May 18, 2011
Time: 9 am to 3:30 pm
Location: NHS Hall at the Center for Urban Horticulture
Register online.

CUH Dry Stream BedThe Washington Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects and the University of Washington
Botanic Gardens present this symposium on issues surrounding the Sustainable Sites Initiative. This day-long
event will dig into the science behind and intent of the Sustainable Sites Initiative with a focus on how the SITES guidelines can transform our urban ecosystems, horticulture industry, and design and construction practices. Educational sessions and small group dialogue will identify the current obstacles and brainstorm ways to hurdle them. The day will build cross-disciplinary relationships, with focused discussion among horticultural specialists, landscape architects, nursery industry representatives, arborists, planners, scientists, landscape maintenance contractors and city staff.

Keynote address: Urban Ecosystem Services and Their Value by Kathleen Wolf, Ph.D.  Dr. Wolf is a Research Social Scientist with the College of the Environment, University of Washington, and has a joint appointment with the USDA Forest Service Pacific NW Research Station to help develop a program on Urban Natural Resources Stewardship.

  • The What and Why of Sustainable Sites Initiative by David McDonald. Mr. McDonald is a biologist and environmental scientist with Seattle Public Utilities, focusing on soil science and environmentally friendly landscape design and development practices. He serves on the technical core committee of the national Sustainable Sites Initiative.
  • Salmon Safe Program: Local Performance Demonstrated by Ellen Southard. Ms. Southard, Honorary AIA, is the Outreach Coordinator for Salmon Safe and Stewardship Partners. She is a trained community engagement facilitator with 20 years experience advising on low impact development and preservation.
  • Urban Design and Sustainable Sites: Dual Performances or Dueling Performances? by
    Brice Maryman. Mr. Maryman is a landscape architect with SvR Design Company.  His work focuses on making urban systems that are humane, ecologically-responsive, healthy and equitable.
  • Can Nurseries Meet the Objectives of SITES? by Tom Quigley.  Mr. Quigley is the owner and manager of Olympic Nursery in Woodinville, a retail/wholesale nursery and landscape installation firm specializing in trees, and past president of WSNLA.
  • Breakout group discussions and reporting on solutions and next steps

Cost: $75, lunch included.
Available credits: LAs, WSNLA, APLD WA, ISA
Contact: Jean Robins at 206-685-8033.

Symposium flyer and print registration form.

Share

2011 Urban Forest Symposium

March 8th, 2011 by Tech Librarian, Tracy Mehlin

Arboretum Drive by E. WeltyTrees and the Urban Infrastructure

Plant Amnesty and the University of Washington Botanic Gardens are reprising their highly successful Urban Forestry Symposium, an all day event at the Center for Urban Horticulture. The past two symposiums have focused on the value and preservation of trees; this year’s event will delve into the nitty gritty of how can trees and urban infrastructure co-exist. The event will bring together highly-regarded “tree people” from a variety of fields that affect urban trees, including ecologists, arborists, landscape architects, and utility planners. The symposium promises to be highly informative, with sessions covering topics ranging from foundational values to technical solutions and political strategies. Inspirational keynote speaker Chris Maser has been called “Gandhi of the forest”. He is a research ecologist and courageous writer who rethinks the future beyond simple slogans – using hard science and the wisdom of the ages he can and will show us how the urban forest can be designed to effectively serve the citizens of the city. Additional presentations and panels promise to be lively.

Where:                UWBG Center for Urban Horticulture, 3501 NE 41st Street, Seattle 98105

When:                  Monday, May 9, 2011 from 9 am to 4 pm

Cost:                      $55.   Lunch is an additional $15.  Bringing your own sack lunch is also an                                     option.  There will be a free lunch for the first 50 registrants.

Credits:                Credits available for ISA, WALP, WSNLA, APLD WA and ASLA members.

Contact:               Jean Robins at 206-685-8033, jrobins@uw.edu

Complete informationRegister online or print and return this registration form.

Share