More Service Learning at the Arboretum

June 12th, 2012 by Arboretum Education Supervisor, Patrick Mulligan

Posted on behalf of Will Pleskow, UW student and UWBG volunteer service learner


 

I never thought weeds would be so endless and time consuming but I certainly have a new perspective on weeding after many back-breaking hours digging out seemingly endless little green plants. All of the planting and weeding that I have done and will do take place right outside the greenhouse in a secluded part of the Arboretum used for plant propagation. The vegetable garden has lain fallow for many months so as you can imagine the weeds were quite healthy at the start of the quarter.  The two primary weeds are shotweed (Cardamine hirsute) and horsetail (Equisetum sp.).  Horsetails were some of the first land plants to evolve on planet earth and continue to make their impact on gardens as well as my back.

Shotweed is a small  plant that has green leaves and sometimes a yellow-white flower budding from the middle. It’s native to North America, Europe, and Asia. It’s part of the mustard family and is the only weed I encountered at the Arboretum that is edible. Shotweed flowers early in the spring up until autumn.  After budding Shotweed develops seeds in pods that are highly sensitive and will often burst upon being touched “shooting” its seeds flying in a close proximity to its mother plant. The easy distribution of seeds is what makes this plant multiply and infest so quickly. Often times removing all of the shotweeds visible with the naked eye is not enough as their seeds may still lie around buried in the soil.  Due to shotweed distinct qualities it makes it a difficult weed to eradicate and is therefore very prevalent in many parts of the world.

Horsetail is about 1 – 2 feet tall and sticks straight up with whisker-like leaves coming off the sides that give it its distinct look and name. Horsetails, like ferns, are plants that reproduce with spores rather than seeds. Despite its irritating affect when dealing with in the garden, this fascinating plant is a “living fossil” and one of the oldest land plants on earth dating back some 375 million years. This remarkable weed is found everywhere in the world except Antarctica. The horsetail prefers wet sandy soils but is adaptable to almost any type of soil. The stalks start deep beneath the ground, which make it hard to dig out, and also very enduring. In addition, it is also unaffected by many herbicides so the only way to remove this weed is by hand. Horsetail along with shotweed makes for a very lethal duo in the garden and creates a situation where one must constantly be weeding to sustain a healthy garden.

With the new experience I have gained by volunteering at the Arboretum this quarter, I plan to grow and cultivate a sustainable and environmentally friendly garden of my own. This ties directly with what we have been discussing in class and the strong importance professor Litfin places on “knowing where your food is coming from.” I hope one day to have a garden of my own where I can grow my own plants and provide food for myself from my very own garden. This service learning project has been a great opportunity to get hands-on experience with growing and cultivating food in an environmentally friendly and healthy way.

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Green Weed Managment

June 8th, 2012 by Arboretum Education Supervisor, Patrick Mulligan

Posted on behalf of UW student and UWBG volunteer intern, Mitch Halliday.

Mitch volunteered at the Arboretum this past quarter as one of our “Greenhouse and Vegetable Garden Caretakers”.  The endless task of weeding the garden beds obviously had an impact. 


Mitch and his girlfriend planting beets, beans & kohlrabi

 

Vinegar Weed Killer:

Vinegar contains a weak acid, Acetic acid.  By applying this vinegar to the soil, it lowers the pH, increasing the acidity, of the soil from a range that is tolerable to an intolerable level.  Most vinegars have an acid content of around 5%, a more concentrated solution of 10% to 20% will more effectively kill weeds.  This is not however a miracle solution, at the right strength this organic weed killer will kill the leaves of any plant it comes in contact with, but not the roots.  Which makes this treatment most effective on young weeds which do not have enough energy stored in their roots to successfully regrow.  Repeated applications will be needed to permanently disable more established weeds.

Vinegar Weed Killer Recipe[1]

• 120 mls (4 ounces) Lemon juice concentrate

• 1 liter (1 quart) white or cider vinegar

Spray bottle for applying organic weed killer Simply mix the two ingredients together in a spray bottle and you have your organic weed killer formula.

Spot spray it directly on the weeds, being careful not to spray desirable plants. For the most effective result the best time to spray is during the heat of the day.

 

Weed Killer #2[2]

  • 1 tbsp gin
  • 1 tbsp cider vinegar
  • 1 tsp dish detergent
  • 1 quart water

Mix all ingredients in a large bowl and pour into a spray bottle. This method will kill the roots, but will prevent growth afterwards for 3-5 days, so it should be used  in an area that you do not intend to plant in.

 

Traditional Methods[3]:

  1. Weeding, we all know how tedious and back-breaking it can be, but it is the most effective natural method of controlling weeds.  To make things easier on yourself weed after it has rained or wet the ground around weeds to make them easier to pull out.  An investment into a few weeding tools will go a long way as well.
  2. Pour boiling water on weeds.  Making pasta or boiling potatoes for dinner?  Instead of pouring that hot water down the drain, pour the water your weeds and they will shrivel and die in a few days.
  3. Blackout.  All plants need sunlight to survive, weeds are no different.  By layering newspaper or scrap paper (it’s biodegradable) over the weeds and blocking out the sunlight they will die.
  4. Eat ‘em.  Many of the weeds present in our gardens are in fact edible.  Dandelion leaves, for example are excellent in a tossed salad.  I would suggest picking up a book about wild-forage from a library or book store.
  5. The hardest of all, Learn to love them.  Maybe it’s time to appreciate these little plants for their natural beauty, hardiness, and pervasiveness.

 


[1] “Organic Weed Killer Formula: Natural Homemade Vinegar Weed Killer Recipe..” Sustainable    Living on a Small                                Farm the Permaculture Way. Web. 6 June 2012. <http://www.small-farm-permaculture-and-sustainable      -living.com/organic_weed_killer_formula.html>.

[2] Richford, Nannette. “DIY: How to Make Organic Weed Killer.” Yahoo Voices.  Web. 6 June 2012.                                               <voices.yahoo.com/diy-organic-weed-killer-1393951.html>.

[3] Yeager, Jeff. “Homemade Organic Weed Killers.” The Daily Green. Web. 6 June 2012.                                                                   <http://www.thedailygreen.com/green-homes/latest/homemade-weed-killers#fbIndex1>.

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