September 24, 2013

2nd Annual BIOE-AP Fall Open House

8:30am-5:00pm | Seattle Campus

Participating Companies

  • Acucela Inc.  logo
  • Aerotek logo
  • American Cancer Society logo
  • American Heart Association logo
  • Amgen logo
  • Applied Precision logo
  • BEAT BioTherapeutics logo
  • Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation logo
  • Bio Ventures for Global Health logo
  • Cerevast Therapeutics logo
  • EMD Millipore logo
  • Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center logo
  • GE Healthcare logo
  • Institute for Systems Biology logo
  • Integrated Diagnostics logo
  • Kibble & Prentice logo
  • Life Science Discovery Fund logo
  • Lockheed Martin logo
  • Medtronic logo
  • Merck logo
  • Micronics logo
  • Mobisante logo
  • NIH National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute logo
  • Oasis Diagnostics logo
  • PATH logo
  • Philips logo
  • Physio Control logo
  • Precision Image Analysis logo
  • Pregenen logo
  • Sage Bionetworks logo
  • Seattle Children's  logo
  • Sigma-Aldrich logo
  • Stratos logo
  • Washington Research Foundation logo
  • Zymogenetics logo
View All Companies >

Information

Overview

Whether you’re a lone investor, a multinational organization or somewhere in-between, the UW Bioengineering annual Fall Open House will help you expand your success. During a day packed with discussions, insights, learning and networking, you’ll learn about emerging research areas and connect with the greater bioengineering community of companies, nonprofits, investors and UW Bioengineering faculty, staff and students.

Conference highlights include keynote presentations from government and industry, finding non-dilutive funding, diverse panel discussions, student poster sessions, and plenty of time for free discussions.

  • Why UW Bioengineering?
    A joint department of both the UW School of Medicine and the UW College of Engineering, UW Bioengineering’s graduates program ranks 6th in the nation, and its undergraduate program also ranks in the top 10.

    • UW Bioengineering has a long history of successful translational research.
      UW Bioengineering’s Market Impact:
      • 1,010 patents pending
      • 287 patents issued
      • 3 copyrighted software
      • 31 active licenses
      • 602 reported inventions
      • 23 existing startup companies resulting from faculty and
        student research
  • Why attend?
    • Build company awareness and exposure
    • Discuss challenges and trends in a non-competitive commons-type environment where companies can feel comfortable sharing ideas
    • Great chance to meet with bright students who could be future employees
    • Celebrate the bioengineering field
    • Build your professional network

Open Convocation

8:45-10:50 a.m., UW Seattle upper campus, Johnson Hall, Room 102

Welcome and opening remarks:

  • University of Washington remarks
  • Washington Biotechnology & Biomedical Association remarks

Non-Dilutive Funding Panel Discussions
How can your company or lab optimize the odds of securing non-dilutive funding to advance your technologies? In this discussion, representatives from life sciences foundations will discuss their research interests and priorities, the role of public-private partnering, and what they look for in selecting grant proposals. This panel will explain the mechanisms behind shared revenue opportunities for both industry leads and academics in the audience.

Keynote Speaker
The 2013 Keynote speaker is Dr. Roderic Pettigrew, Director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering at the National Institutes of Health. Read his bio. His talk will be followed by a brief question and answer period.

Core Research Session I: Faculty presentations

11:10am-12:10pm, UW Seattle lower campus, William H. Foege Hall

Dive into one of five core research areas at UW Bioengineering. This session features five parallel presentations, each with a mix of core faculty and graduate students presenting their current research. Choose from the five core research themes:

  • Biomaterials & Regenerative Medicine (N503)
  • Instrumentation, Imaging and Image-guided Therapy (N130)
  • Molecular & Cellular Engineering (N303)
  • Systems, Synthetic & Quantitative Biology (N230)
  • Technology for Expanding Access to Healthcare (N403)

Objectives:

  • Updates on the latest research at UW that may help your research goals
  • Understanding of new research directions in UW Bioengineering
Lunch break for Core Research Sessions, William H. Foege Hall Lobby

Core Research Session II: Industry presentations

1:00-2:15 p.m., William H. Foege Hall

In this lightning round-style session, you’ll get to know a range of companies as they present who they are, what they’re about and where they’re headed. Representatives will include company lead scientists or the lead technical person. As in the Faculty presentations, this session features five parallel presentations featuring industry-based counterparts in each of the following areas:

  • Biomaterials & Regenerative Medicine (N503)
  • Instrumentation, Imaging and Image-guided Therapy (N130)
  • Molecular & Cellular Engineering (N303)
  • Systems, Synthetic & Quantitative Biology (N230)
  • Technology for Expanding Access to Healthcare (N403)

Objectives:

  • UW faculty awareness about biotech companies
  • Share research and company goals
  • Interactive awareness of what other companies are doing

BioE Curriculum Forum and lunch meeting

11:10am-12:10pm, UW Seattle lower campus, South Campus Center, Room 254

Are your new hires prepared in just the right way? We want to ensure our graduates have the skills they need to be successful in an evolving industry. In this one-hour discussion, UW Bioengineering seeks input from companies and organizations on our curriculum and how we can prepare our students to address changing needs in industry.

Learning Objectives:

  • Updates on company needs and emerging industry trends
  • Understanding of how UW students are prepared
  • How companies can create internship opportunities
  • Ways to increase diversity in bioengineering and outreach to underrepresented students

Career Fair

12:30-2:15 p.m., UW Seattle lower campus, South Campus Center, Room 316

The UW Bioengineering Career Fair gives companies the opportunity to gain visibility, meet our students and share information about your organization’s mission and goals. Companies and organizations interested in hosting a booth at the Career Fair should complete the following online form:

Career Fair Interest Form

Industry Keynote

2:45-3:30 p.m., Hogness Auditorium, Health Science Building

The 2013 Industry Keynote speaker is Michael Harsh, Vice President & Chief Technology Officer at GE Healthcare. Read his bio. His talk will be followed by a brief question and answer period.

Student Poster Session and Networking Reception

3:45-5:00 p.m., South Campus Center, Room 316

This reception is the perfect opportunity to make the most of new business connections and to continue your discussions from earlier in the day. If you haven’t already, you can plant seeds with new colleagues for future collaborations. You’ll also have the chance to meet current UW bioengineering students and learn about their current research projects.

Dr. Roderic Pettigrew's portraitDr. Roderic Pettigrew's portrait

Dr. Roderic Pettigrew

Director, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health

Roderic I. Pettigrew, Ph.D., M.D., is the first Director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering at the NIH. Prior to his appointment at the NIH, he was Professor of Radiology, Medicine (Cardiology) at Emory University and Bioengineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Director of the Emory Center for MR Research, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. Pettigrew is known for his pioneering work at Emory University involving four-dimensional imaging of the cardiovascular system using magnetic resonance (MRI).

Dr. Pettigrew graduated cum laude from Morehouse College with a B.S. in Physics, where he was a Merrill Scholar; has an M.S. in Nuclear Science and Engineering from Rennselear Polytechnic Institute; and a Ph.D. in Applied Radiation Physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he was a Whitaker Harvard-MIT Health Sciences Scholar. Subsequently, he received an M.D. from the University of Miami School of Medicine in an accelerated two-year program, did an internship and residency in internal medicine at Emory University and completed a residency in nuclear medicine at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Pettigrew then spent a year as a clinical research scientist with Picker International, the first manufacturer of MRI equipment, where he helped develop their first cardiac imaging technology. In 1985, he joined Emory as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Fellow with an interest in non-invasive cardiac imaging. His current research focuses on integrated imaging and predictive biomechanical modeling of coronary atherosclerotic disease.

Dr. Pettigrew’s awards include membership in Phi Beta Kappa, the Bennie Award (Benjamin E. Mays) for Achievement, and being named the Most Distinguished Alumnus of the University of Miami (1990). He was the Radiological Society of North America’s 75th Diamond Jubilee Eugene P. Pendergrass New Horizons Lecturer. He is also the recipient of the Herbert Nickens Award of the ABC, the Pritzker Distinguished Achievement Award of the Biomedical Engineering Society, and the Distinguished Service Award of the National Medical Association. He has been elected to membership in two components of the US National Academies: the Institute of Medicine, and the National Academy of Engineering.

Michael Harsh's portraitMichael Harsh's portrait

Michael Harsh

Vice President & Chief Technology Officer, GE Healthcare

Michael J. “Mike” Harsh is Vice President and Chief Technology Officer for GE Healthcare, a $17 billion division of General Electric that helps its customers to deliver better care to more people around the world at a lower cost. GE Healthcare consists of diverse businesses including medical imaging and information technologies, medical diagnostics, patient monitoring systems, technologies facilitating drug discovery, biopharmaceutical manufacturing technologies, and performance improvement and performance solutions services.

Mike leads the global Science and Technology Organization for GE Healthcare, focusing its research and development teams on creating and sustaining innovative diagnostics, healthcare IT, and life sciences product offerings that reduce healthcare costs, improve healthcare quality, and increase patient access to healthcare globally.

Mike began his career at GE in 1979 as an electrical design engineer in nuclear imaging, and subsequently held numerous design and engineering management positions with X-ray, Ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Patient Monitoring, and Information Technologies.

Subsequently, Mike was named Global Technology Leader – Imaging Technologies Lab at the GE Global Research Center, where he led the research for imaging technologies across the company as well as the research associated with computer visualization/image analysis and superconducting systems. Mike was named an officer of the General Electric Company in November 2006.

Mike received a bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering from Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and he holds numerous U.S. patents in the field of medical imaging and instrumentation.

Open Convocation

UW Welcome Remarks

Charles McLien III's portraitCharles McLien III's portrait

Charles McLien IIIRead More »

Director
UW Bioengineering Affiliates Program

Charles McLien joined the Department of Bioengineering in May 2012. As Director for the Bioengineering Affiliates Program (BioE-AP), Charles is responsible for the program’s development including: developing a centralized office for BioE industry relations, recruiting corporate and individual members, and launching student-based programs within the program. He also serve as a member of the department’s marketing and communications team.

Charles’ career has focused on life sciences educational outreach, fundraising and program development.

Prior to joining Bioengineering, Charles worked in Corporate and Foundation Relations for College of Engineering(CoE) Advancement. In this role, he was involved in development activities to support the fundraising needs for the Colleges ten academic department.

A native of South Bend, Indiana, Charles graduated with a BS in Biology from Morehouse College.

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Cecilia Giachelli, PhD's portraitCecilia Giachelli, PhD's portrait

Cecilia Giachelli, PhDRead More »

Interim Chair & Professor, UW Department of Bioengineering
Adjunct Professor, UW Department of Pathology
Adjunct Professor, UW Department of Oral Biology

Dr. Cecilia Giachelli is Professor of Bioengineering, Adjunct Professor of Pathology, and Adjunct Professor of Oral Biology at the University of Washington, Seattle, WA USA. She received her undergraduate training in Biochemistry from University of California at Davis and the doctoral degree in Pharmacology from the University of Washington. She completed postdoctoral fellowships in Pathology and Pharmacology at the University of Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Giachelli is internationally recognized for her work investigating the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification and extracellular matrix control of cell function. Her studies have led to the discovery of key inducers and inhibitors that contribute to vascular calcification in the setting of chronic kidney disease, atherosclerosis and medical devices. These discoveries are currently being translated to therapeutic strategies to block inappropriate calcification in disease and biomaterials development. Other areas of research include control of inflammation and foreign body reaction, regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Dr. Giachelli is on the editorial board of Circulation Research and Cardiovascular Pathology, and she has published over 100 articles in top journals, including Circulation Research, Kidney International, Journal of Clinical Investigation, and Journal of Biological Chemistry. Dr. Giachelli was awarded the American Heart Association Established Investigator Award, the American Society of Nephrology Jack Coburn endowed lectureship, and is an elected fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. She has received both public and private funding for research on vascular calcification.

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Michael K. Young's portraitMichael K. Young's portrait

Michael K. YoungRead More »

President
University of Washington

Michael K. Young became President of the University of Washington on July 1, 2011. Also a tenured Professor of Law, President Young has a distinguished record as an academic leader with broad experience in public service and diplomacy. As UW President, he leads the nation’s top public university (2nd among all universities) in attracting federal research funding.

Prior to his appointment at the UW, he served as President and Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Utah. Under President Young’s leadership, Utah raised its stature nationally and internationally. It led the nation in the number of new companies generated from university research, significantly raised the academic profile of the student body, expanded international education, and built more than 2 million square feet of new research and teaching facilities. Private giving to the university also rose significantly during President Young’s tenure, and the number of donors more than doubled.

Before assuming the presidency at Utah, he was Dean and Lobingier Professor of Comparative Law and Jurisprudence at the George Washington University Law School. He was also a professor at Columbia University for more than 20 years, and prior to joining the Columbia University faculty, he served as a law clerk to the late Chief (then Associate) Justice William H. Rehnquist of the United States Supreme Court.

President Young has held numerous government positions, including Deputy Under Secretary for Economic and Agricultural Affairs and Ambassador for Trade and Environmental Affairs in the Department of State during the presidency of the first President Bush. He also served as a member of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom from 1998-2005 and chaired the Commission on two occasions.

He has published extensively on a wide range of topics, including the Japanese legal system, dispute resolution, mergers and acquisitions, labor relations, the legal profession, comparative law, industrial policy, international trade law, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), international environmental law and international human rights and freedom of religion. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a fellow of the American Bar Foundation.

President Young is a graduate of Brigham Young University (B.A., 1973) and Harvard Law School (J.D., 1976), where he served as a note editor of the Harvard Law Review.

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Industry Welcome Remarks

Dennis Kroft's portraitDennis Kroft's portrait

Dennis KroftRead More »

Vice President, Marketing and Membership
Washington Biotechnology & Biomedical Association

Dennis Kroft joined the WBBA in January 2012 as Director of Marketing and Membership.  Mr. Kroft is responsible for the strategic marketing efforts for the WBBA, as well as the direction and management of membership development, recruitment and retention. Additionally, he will lead WBBA’s messaging and communication strategy, membership benefits/affinity programs, member publications, web site and promotion, including event sponsorships.

Before joining the WBBA, Mr. Kroft was Marketing Principal for the Princeton, NJ-based science & technology group of HDR, a global architectural and engineering firm where he dealt with firms such as Pfizer, Merck, Johnson & Johnson, Sanofi-Aventis, Quest Diagnostics and Daiichi Sankyo. Prior to HDR, Mr. Kroft held senior leadership roles in corporate sales and marketing for global and regional professional services firms.

Mr. Kroft brings a long history of trade and service organization involvement in the areas of event planning and membership recruitment with groups that include the International Facility Management Association (IFMA), the International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineers (ISPE) and the U.S. Green Building Council – New Jersey (USGBC-NJ).

Mr. Kroft holds a Bachelor of Science in Finance from Monmouth University, West Long Branch, New Jersey.

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Non- Dilutive Funding Panel Discussion

Hugh Chang's portraitHugh Chang's portrait

Hugh ChangRead More »

Director of Strategy, Planning & Management for Global Development
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Hugh Chang, Director of Strategy, Planning & Management for Global Development, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, works closely with the President and leadership team for Global Development on strategic planning, portfolio management and coordination across the foundation’s global activities. He provides strategy development support to the Global Health and Global Policy and Advocacy teams. He also oversees the Global Libraries program in Global Development.

Before joining the foundation in 2012, Hugh was Director of Special Initiatives at PATH, and led development of its strategic framework, including measurement and evaluation, annual planning meetings and processes for continuous improvement.

Hugh received his Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering from UC Davis, his Master’s of Business Administration from UCLA, and Master’s in Bioengineering from the University of Washington. He currently serves on the Board of Advisers for the Department of Bioengineering for the University of Washington and is a former board member of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, the Washington Biotech and Biomedical Association, and the Overlake School.

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Mark Hertle, PhD's portraitMark Hertle, PhD's portrait

Mark Hertle, PhDRead More »

Senior Program Officer
Life Science Discovery Fund

Mark is the Senior Program Officer for the LSDF and has a background in life sciences research, science education, and grant making.   He has a Ph.D. in Developmental Biology from University College, London, and an A.B. in Zoology from the University of California, Berkeley.  At the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, a medical research and grant making.organization, he was Senior Program Officer for Precollege Science Education.  The Precollege Program awarded grants to medical/basic research and informal science education institutions (e.g., museums) for preK-12 science education outreach to students, their families, and teachers.  He previously managed a teacher professional development program at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and a science materials program for Seattle Public Schools.

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Graham Nichol, MD's portraitGraham Nichol, MD's portrait

Graham Nichol, MDRead More »

Member, Board of Directors, Western States Affiliate
American Heart Association

Graham Nichol is the Medic One Foundation Endowed Chair in Prehospital Emergency Care as well as Director, University of Washington-Harborview Center for Prehospital Emergency Care and Medical Director, University of Washington Clinical Trial Center in Seattle, WA. He serves a Professor of Medicine at the University of Washington.

He is founder and co-chair of the Resuscitation Science Symposium.  He was awarded the AHA Award of Meritorious Achievement for his work on the Resuscitation Science Symposium in 2008. He serves as a member, of the national Mission: Lifeline Executive, American Heart Association.
Dr. Nichol received his undergraduate and Doctor of Medicine degrees from the University of Western Ontario. He completed clinical training in Internal Medicine at the University of Western Ontario then postgraduate training at the University of Ottawa as well as the Harvard School of Public Health.  He is a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada, American College of Physicians, Heart Rhythm Society, American Heart Association and the American Society for Clinical Investigation.

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Kurt Marek, PhD's portraitKurt Marek, PhD's portrait

Kurt Marek, PhDRead More »

Program Director
NIH National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Dr. Marek is a Program Director at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) where he coordinates the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. In this role, he develops, manages and evaluates scientific programs to support small businesses performing research and development on innovative biomedical products and to facilitate partnerships between small businesses, investors and strategic partners. Dr. Marek provides advice to small businesses on all aspects of the SBIR program, including funding opportunities, the application process, and commercializing technologies. Dr. Marek was instrumental in the development of the Office of Translational Alliances and Coordination, the NHLBI office charged with developing trans-NHLBI programs to foster the translation of early stage discoveries into commercial products. He has received numerous awards over the course of his government service, and has served as an organizer of and speaker at national conferences. Dr. Marek began working at the NHLBI in 2010 as an AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow.

Prior to beginning his fellowship at the NIH, Dr. Marek was a Damon Runyon Cancer Research Fellow at the University of California, San Diego where he studied the development of the spinal cord, using genomics to identify new roles for electrical activity in the nervous system and characterizing the underlying molecular mechanisms. Dr. Marek received his PhD in Neuroscience from the University of California, San Francisco where he was a Howard Hughes Predoctoral Fellow. He has a BS in Biology and a BA in Humanities from the University of California, San Diego.

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David Eaton, PhD, Moderator's portraitDavid Eaton, PhD, Moderator's portrait

David Eaton, PhD, ModeratorRead More »

Dean, UW Graduate School
Associate Vice Provost for Research, UW
Professor, UW Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences

Dr. Eaton received his Ph.D. in pharmacology from the University of Kansas Medical Center (KUMC) in 1978. Following a post-doctoral fellowship in Toxicology at KUMC, he joined the faculty of the University of Washington in 1979. He served as Toxicology Program Director in the Department of Environmental Health from 1983-90, then as Associate Chairman of the Department from 1990-92, and as Associate Dean for Research in the School of Public Health from 1999-2005. He is currently Professor and Director of the Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, an NIEHS Center of Excellence, at the University of Washington, and Associate Vice Provost for Research for the University of Washington. Dr. Eaton maintains his own active research and teaching program focused in the area of the molecular basis for environmental causes of cancer, and how human genetic differences in biotransformation enzymes may increase or decrease individual susceptibility to chemicals found in the environment. Nationally, he has served on the Board of Directors and as Treasurer of the American Board of Toxicology (1990-94), and as President of the Society of Toxicology (2001-02). He has also served on the Board of Environmental Studies and Toxicology, National Academy of Sciences /National Resource Council (1996-99), as a member of the Board of Directors and Vice-President of the Toxicology Education Foundation, and on the Board of Trustees of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. He is an Elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. In 2011 he was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, and to the Washington State Academy of Sciences. He has published over 150 scientific articles and book chapters in the field of toxicology and risk assessment.

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Keynote Speaker

Roderic Pettigrew, PhD, MD's portraitRoderic Pettigrew, PhD, MD's portrait

Roderic Pettigrew, PhD, MDRead More »

Director
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering
National Institutes of Health

Roderic I. Pettigrew, PhD, MD, is the first Director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering at the NIH. Prior to his appointment at the NIH, he was Professor of Radiology, Medicine (Cardiology) at Emory University and Bioengineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Director of the Emory Center for MR Research, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.

Dr. Pettigrew is known for his pioneering work at Emory University involving four-dimensional imaging of the cardiovascular system using magnetic resonance (MRI). Dr. Pettigrew graduated cum laude from Morehouse College with a B.S. in Physics, where he was a Merrill Scholar; has an M.S. in Nuclear Science and Engineering from Rennselear Polytechnic Institute; and a Ph.D. in Applied Radiation Physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he was a Whitaker Harvard-MIT Health Sciences Scholar. Subsequently, he received an M.D. from the University of Miami School of Medicine in an accelerated two-year program, did an internship and residency in internal medicine at Emory University and completed a residency in nuclear medicine at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Pettigrew then spent a year as a clinical research scientist with Picker International, the first manufacturer of MRI equipment, where he helped develop their first cardiac imaging technology. In 1985, he joined Emory as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Fellow with an interest in non-invasive cardiac imaging. His current research focuses on integrated imaging and predictive biomechanical modeling of coronary atherosclerotic disease.

Dr. Pettigrew’s awards include membership in Phi Beta Kappa, the Bennie Award (Benjamin E. Mays) for Achievement, and being named the Most Distinguished Alumnus of the University of Miami (1990). He was the Radiological Society of North America’s 75th Diamond Jubilee Eugene P. Pendergrass New Horizons Lecturer. He is also the recipient of the Herbert Nickens Award of the ABC, the Pritzker Distinguished Achievement Award of the Biomedical Engineering Society, and the Distinguished Service Award of the National Medical Association. He has been elected to membership in two components of the US National Academies: the Institute of Medicine, and the National Academy of Engineering.

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Research Track- Faculty

Biomaterials & Regenerative Medicine

Cecilia Giachelli, PhD's portraitCecilia Giachelli, PhD's portrait

Cecilia Giachelli, PhDRead More »

Interim Chair & Professor, Department of Bioengineering
Adjunct Professor, Department of Pathology
Adjunct Professor, Department of Oral Biology

Dr. Cecilia Giachelli is Professor of Bioengineering, Adjunct Professor of Pathology, and Adjunct Professor of Oral Biology at the University of Washington, Seattle, WA USA. She received her undergraduate training in Biochemistry from University of California at Davis and the doctoral degree in Pharmacology from the University of Washington. She completed postdoctoral fellowships in Pathology and Pharmacology at the University of Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Giachelli is internationally recognized for her work investigating the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification and extracellular matrix control of cell function. Her studies have led to the discovery of key inducers and inhibitors that contribute to vascular calcification in the setting of chronic kidney disease, atherosclerosis and medical devices. These discoveries are currently being translated to therapeutic strategies to block inappropriate calcification in disease and biomaterials development. Other areas of research include control of inflammation and foreign body reaction, regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Dr. Giachelli is on the editorial board of Circulation Research and Cardiovascular Pathology, and she has published over 100 articles in top journals, including Circulation Research, Kidney International, Journal of Clinical Investigation, and Journal of Biological Chemistry. Dr. Giachelli was awarded the American Heart Association Established Investigator Award, the American Society of Nephrology Jack Coburn endowed lectureship, and is an elected fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. She has received both public and private funding for research on vascular calcification.

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Michael Regnier, PhD's portraitMichael Regnier, PhD's portrait

Michael Regnier, PhDRead More »

Professor and Vice-Chair of Development
Adjunct Professor in Physiology & Biophysics
Department of Bioengineering

Dr. Michael Regnier (Ph.D.) is Professor and Vice-Chair of Bioengineering, and is an Adjunct Professor of Physiology & Biophysics at the University of Washington (UW). He is also an Affiliate Investigator of the Benaroya Research Institute (Seattle). Dr. Regnier received his Ph.D. in Neurobiology at the University of Southern California in 1991, followed by post-doctoral research fellowships at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) and UCLA before being recruited to UW in 1995. Dr. Regnier is an Established Investigator of the American Heart Association and he serves on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Sarnoff Society. He is the Principle Investigator on two NIH sponsored Training Grant programs for the Department of Bioengineering, serves on the Advisory Board for the NIH sponsored Anesthesiology & Perioperative Medicine Research Training Program and is Chair of the Bioengineering department Student Affairs Committee. Dr.Regnier is Director of the Heart and Skeletal Muscle (HAMM) research group and is a member of the Stem Cell Research Institute and Cardiovascular Biology Center, located at the South Lake Union Medical Campus of UW in Seattle, WA. His research group studies cardiac and skeletal muscle diseases and develops novel protein, cell and tissue engineering therapeutic approaches to improve function and performance. He holds IP and patents on several of these novel therapeutic approaches and is a Co-Founder and Scientific Advisory Board member of a start-up company, Beat Biotherapeutics, that plans to move these technologies to the clinic.

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Marta Scatena's portraitMarta Scatena's portrait

Marta ScatenaRead More »

Research Associate Professor
Department of Bioengineering

Marta Scatena received a B.S. in Biological Sciences from University of Padua (Italy), PhD in Cell Biology from University of Padua.  Marta joined the Department of Bioengineering as a Post-Doctoral fellow in 1996.  Her research interests are aimed at understanding the mechanisms underlying the pathological processes of cardiovascular diseases. In particular, her lab is interested in the control and regulation of endothelial cells function and angiogenesis, and the control of inflammation.

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Instrumentation, Imaging, Image Guided Therapy

Colin Studholme, PhD's portraitColin Studholme, PhD's portrait

Colin Studholme, PhDRead More »

Professor of Bioengineering
Adjunct Professor, Department of Radiology
Adjunct Professor, Department of Pediatrics

Colin Studholme, an associate professor at the University of California-San Francisco (UCSF), is joining the UW as a professor with a joint appointment in the Departments of Bioengineering and Pediatrics. Studholme studies mathematical and computational analysis of biomedical image data, with a focus on how brain anatomy changes over time.

Studholme grew up in the United Kingdom, earning his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the University of Bradford in England, and his master’s degree in image processing and remote sensing from the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. He worked in satellite imaging at the British Antarctic Survey and then radar imaging research at the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, before he moved back to academia to earn his doctoral degree. He completed his Ph.D. in medical physics and biophysics from the University of London, in the use of information theory in the automated alignment of imaging data acquired from MRI, CT and PET scanners.

After his Ph.D., he moved to Yale University, completing a postdoctoral fellowship in diagnostic radiology, with his research focusing on brain mapping techniques for functional and structural imaging studies. Studholme joined the faculty of the UCSF Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging in 2000, and was promoted to associate professor in 2006. During his time at UCSF, he has also served as a visiting faculty member in biomedical engineering at the Mayo Clinic and at the Fields Institute of the University of Toronto, and he has recently become an associate editor for the journal IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging.

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Hubert Vesselle, PhD, MD's portraitHubert Vesselle, PhD, MD's portrait

Hubert Vesselle, PhD, MDRead More »

Director, Division of Nuclear Medicine
University of Washington Medical Center
Professor, Department of Radiology
Adjunct Professor, Department of Bioengineering

Dr. Vesselle obtained both his medical degree and his PhD in biomedical engineering from Case Western Reserve in Cleveland, Ohio. He is fellowship trained in both Nuclear Medicine and Abdominal Imaging. Dr. Vesselle joined the University of Washington in 1997.

He devotes one day a week to the Abdominal Imaging section and the remainder of his time to research, teaching and clinical work in the Division of Nuclear Medicine. His areas of research are in PET applied to oncology, lung cancer and imaging tumor proliferation with PET. He is also particularly interested in PET/CT systems. As part of his clinical activity he focuses on correlative imaging between nuclear imaging and anatomic cross-sectional imaging.

Dr. Vesselle is a dedicated teacher and researcher and serves as a mentor for medical students, fellows and residents. Dr. Vesselle participates in several courses for medical students including diagnostic radiology courses (RAD 693), nuclear medicine preceptorship (RADGY 505). He also presents several Nuclear Medicine and PET lectures each year. Dr. Vesselle also organizes and chairs the annual University of Washington PET CME course.

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David J. Marcinek, PhD's portraitDavid J. Marcinek, PhD's portrait

David J. Marcinek, PhDRead More »

Co-Director, Translational Center for Metabolic Imaging
Research Assistant Professor, Department of Radiology
Adjunct Professor, Department of Bioengineering

Dr. David Marcinek (Ph.D.) is Associate Professor of Radiology and Adjunct Associate Professor of Bioengineering and Pathology. He is also Affiliate Faculty of the Mitochondria and Metabolism Center at the South Lake Union campus of the University of Washington (UW). Dr. Marcinek received his Ph.D. in Physiology at Hopkins Marine Station of Stanford University in 2000. He performed a postdoctoral fellowship at the UW with Kevin Conley before joining the faculty at UW in 2005. Dr. Marcinek is a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee for the American Federation of Aging Research. He was an Ellison New Scholar in Aging and has been the PI on multiple NIH grants. Dr. Marcinek is currently the Co-Director of the Translational Center for Metabolic Imaging (TCMI) and is a member of the Executive Committee for the Nathan Shock Center of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging at the UW. His laboratory is located on the South Lake Union campus of UW in Seattle, WA. His research focus is on integrating novel non-invasive spectroscopy tools with biochemical analyses to understand the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in aging and disease with a particular focus on skeletal muscle. He is currently working with collaborators to translate novel basic science insights in animal models into diagnostic and intervention applications in human patients for two projects in his lab.

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Molecular & Cellular Engineering

Patrick Stayton, PhD's portraitPatrick Stayton, PhD's portrait

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Washington Research Foundation Professor, Department of Bioengineering
Director, Molecular Engineering Sciences Institute

Patrick Stayton currently serves as the Washington Research Foundation Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Washington. He is the founding Director of the Institute for Molecular Engineering and Sciences, and the Center for Intracellular Delivery of Biologics. He received his B.S. in Biology (summa cum laude) from Illinois State University in 1984, his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Illinois in 1989, and was a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, also at the University of Illinois.

Dr. Stayton’s eclectic research group works at the interface of fundamental molecular science and applied molecular bioengineering. His laboratory has fundamental projects aimed at elucidating the basic principles underlying biomolecular recognition, and connected projects applying these principles to medical applications in the drug delivery, point-of-care diagnostics, and regenerative medicine fields. He has published over 200 scientific papers. Dr. Stayton has a strong interest in translating the group’s research, has been awarded several patents, and is a co-founder of the startup companies PhaseRx Inc. based on his group’s biologic drug delivery work, and Nexgenia based on their diagnostic work.

Dr. Stayton has been elected as a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and has been the recipient of the Clemson Award from the Society For Biomaterials and the CRS-Cygnus Recognition Award from the Controlled Release Society. He served as Co-Chair of the Gordon Conference on Drug Carriers in Medicine and Biology in 2010. He has also been awarded the 2009 Faculty Research Innovation Award, UW College of Engineering, and the Distinguished Teacher and Mentor Award from the Department of Bioengineering. He also directs the NIH-funded Initiative for Maximizing Student Diversity Program at UW.

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Research Assistant Professor
Department of Bioengineering

Patrick Koelsch is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Washington. As a NESAC/BIO investigator, his research focuses on the in situ and in vitro characterization of biomolecules and cells at interfaces using non-linear optical spectroscopy. He will further develop and apply the NESAC/BIO picosecond and upcoming femtosecond sum-frequency-generation spectrometers.

Dr. Koelsch received a Ph.D. from the Max-Planck-Institute of Colloid and Interface Science in 2005. His current research interests include structure-function models for biomolecules and ordering phenomena within the extracellular matrix of adherent cells.

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Research Associate Professor
Department of Bioengineering

Lara J. Gamble is currently a Research Associated Professor in the department of Bioengineering at the University of Washington and has been on the faculty at UW since 2004. She received her undergraduate degree in Chemistry from UCSC (1990) and a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from the University of Washington (1996) with Prof. Charles Campbell studying organofunctionalization of oxide surfaces. Prof. Gamble did her postdoctoral research at the National ESCA and Surface Analysis Center for Biomedical research (1997-2000) then worked at Zyomyx, Inc., a biotech startup in Fremont, CA, on surface chemistry and analysis for protein and DNA biosensor applications before returning to the University of Washington. Her current research interests still include biosensor development and analysis, but her primary research focus is in designing better tools and methods for sub-cellular 3D molecular imaging mass spectrometry. The mass-spectral imaging studies are currently being used for better understanding and diagnosing biological processes such as tumor microenvironments and lipid metabolomics in relationship to cancer.

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Systems, Synthetic & Quantitative Biology

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Herb Sauro, PhDRead More »

Associate Professor
Department of Bioengineering

Herb Sauro received a B.S. in Biochemistry/Microbiology from University of Canterbury (UK), Masters in Biological Computation from University of York UUK), and a Ph.D. in Computational Biochemistry from Oxford Brookes University (UK). Herb joined the Department of Bioengineering  as an Associate Professor in 2007. His research interests include how cells operate using quantitative and computational approaches.

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Valerie Daggett, PhD's portraitValerie Daggett, PhD's portrait

Valerie Daggett, PhDRead More »

Professor of Bioengineering
Adjunct Professor, Department of Biochemistry
Adjunct Professor, Department of Biomedical and Health Informatics

Dr. Daggett received her BA in Chemistry from Reed College in 1983. She entered the graduate program in Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the University of California, San Francisco in 1985 and received her PhD in 1990. She was then a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Structural Biology at Stanford University until the end of 1992. She moved to the University of Washington as an Assistant Professor in Medicinal Chemistry at the beginning of 1993. She moved to the Bioengineering Department in 2007. She is a member of the UW Biophysics Program and the Neurobiology and Behavior Program. She was a founding member of the Biomolecular Structure and Design Program and served as the director for a number of years. Dr Daggett has active funding from the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Energy, and private foundations. She is a Fellow of the Biophysical Society. She serves on numerous journal editorial boards, including Biochemistry, eLife, Current Opinion in Structural Biology, and she is Senior Editor of Protein Engineering, Design and Selection. The research in her lab involves both computational and experimental studies of protein structural, folding and dynamics. In particular she specializes in atomistic simulations of protein conformational behavior, and development of analysis methods and bioinformatics approaches to mining large data sets. Her group has the largest collection of protein simulations and protein structures in the world, comprising hundreds of terabytes of data. Consequently they are also actively involved in visual analytics. In addition, they are pursuing experimental studies focused on novel, putatively toxic amyloidogenic structures observed in their computational studies. These studies are paving the way for amyloid therapeutics and diagnostic agents. She has one issued patent in this area and another submitted application. Also, two more patent applications are in the works involving Big Data methods. She has published over 220 scientific papers.

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James M. Carothers, PhD's portraitJames M. Carothers, PhD's portrait

James M. Carothers, PhDRead More »

Assistant Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering
Adjunct Professor, Bioengineering

James is an Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Bioengineering, and Member of the Molecular Engineering & Sciences Institute (MolES) and Center for Synthetic Biology at the University of Washington, and an Affiliated Investigator of the NSF Synthetic Biology Engineering Research Center (SynBERC). In his work, he combines computational modeling, in vitro selection and genetic engineering to develop designable RNA-based genetic control systems for synthetic biology applications in cell-based therapeutics, global health, and renewable chemicals production. Previously, he was a postdoctoral fellow and research scientist with Jay D. Keasling at UC Berkeley and the DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute. There, he developed design-driven approaches to engineer RNA-based genetic control devices for programming quantitatively-predictable functions in synthetic biological systems. James was a graduate student at Harvard, where he earned a Ph.D. with Jack W. Szostak. As a graduate student, he used information theory, in vitro selection, RNA biochemisty and 3D solution NMR to show that there may be a fundamental, quantitative relationship between the informational complexities of molecular structures and the functional activities they can perform. James has a B.S. in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry from Yale. He has received the Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, Jane Coffin Childs Memorial Fund Postdoctoral Fellowship, National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship, and the Harvard Graduate Prize Fellowship.

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Technology for Expanding Access to Healthcare

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Professor of Bioengineering
Adjunct Professor, Department of Oral Biology
Adjunct Professor, Department of Global Health

Prof. Yager received his A.B. in Biochemistry from Princeton in 1975, and a Ph.D. in Chemistry from University of Oregon in 1980. He joined UW Bioengineering in 1987, became Vice Chair in 2001, Acting Chair in 2007 and Chair from 2008 through June 2013. He currently is adjunct faculty in Chemistry, Oral Biology and Global Health.  Current work focuses on development of low-cost paper-based disposable point-of-care diagnostic tools for infectious disease for use in the developed and developing worlds.  Past sponsors have included NSF, NIH and the Bill & Melinda Gates foundation; current sponsors are NIH and DARPA.

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Research Assistant Professor
Department of Bioengineering

James Lai is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Washington.  To improve health care, caregivers and clinicians need better clinical assays to detect biomarkers for the diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic management of disease. Dr. Lai’s research focuses on the development of molecular reagents for applications in biomolecule separation and diagnostic assays. The overall objective is to improve clinical assays’ sensitivity, specificity, throughput and multiplexing capacity. He is an inventor of the stimuli-responsive magnetic nanoparticle reagents.  His group has been developing new reagent systems that can interface with various analytical technologies to facilitate the corresponding diagnostic applications, including but not limited to infectious diseases.

Dr. Lai received his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Polytechnic Institute of New York University, where he developed some of the magnetic nanoparticle syntheses.  He started his faculty career in 2009 at the University of Washington.  His in vitro diagnostics research program has been recognized with the appointment of conference planning group/session chair for the 2012 AACC Oak Ridge Conference.  He has a strong interest in translating the group’s research, has been awarded a few patents, and is a co-founder of the startup company, Nexgenia Inc., based on group’s diagnostic technologies.

 

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Tueng T. Shen, PhD, MD's portraitTueng T. Shen, PhD, MD's portrait

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Director, Refractive Surgery Center at UW Eye Institute
University of Washington Medical Center
Adjunct Professor, Department of Bioengineering
Adjunct Professor, Department of Ophthalmology
Adjunct Professor, Department of Global Health

Dr. Shen received a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an M.D. from Harvard Medical School. She is an expert in cataract surgeries, refractive surgery, and medical and surgical management of corneal disorders. Dr. Shen established the UW’s artificial cornea clinical program as the referral center of the Pacific Northwest, serving the community of the five-state region of Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana and Idaho, and restoring vision to many patients with end-stage corneal blindness. She also directs a lab — collaborating with colleagues in the School of Engineering to develop innovative solutions to treat global blindness by leveraging technological advancements in polymer sciences, microelectronics and modern imaging techniques.

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Research Track- Industry

Biomaterials & Regenerative Medicine

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Christopher Howard
Senior Technology Commercialization Manager

Chris is a Senior Technology Commercialization Manager in the Center for Developmental Therapeutics at the Seattle Children’s Research Institute. His work includes regulatory, IP, and business strategy development and implementation and leading and supporting all the activities associated with medical device design, development, and manufacture. He has a BA in Industrial Design and spent 2003-2008 working for Whirlwind Wheelchair International in San Francisco designing wheelchairs for manufacture and use in less-resourced settings. He has worked in small and medium scale factories around the world including Colombia, Mexico, Vietnam, and Zambia. Chris received his MBA from the Foster School of Business at the University of Washington in 2010 with emphases on entrepreneurship and analytical marketing.  He is originally from just outside Northeast London, England and has been in the US for about 13 years.

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Sebastian Grajales, PhD
Product Manager, Polymer Science

Yong Zhang, PhD
Market Segment Manager, Materials Science Initiative

Dr. Sebastian Grajales is the Product Manager for polymer science at Sigma-Aldrich Corp.  He has been a product manager for 3 years, managing polymers, monomers, polymerization tools,  additives and functionalized nanoparticles.   Prior to joining Sigma-Aldrich, he was involved in research for 8 years, including internships at NatureWorks, LLC, as well as earning his Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry from Michigan State University.

Dr. Yong Zhang is Market Segment Manager, Materials Science initiative of Sigma-Aldrich Corp. He has more than 8 years of product development and marketing experience for materials science, semiconductor and healthcare industry. Prior to joining Sigma-Aldrich, he worked for Bausch & Lomb Inc., Praxair Inc. and Cabot Microelectronics Corp. Dr. Yong Zhang holds a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Rochester, and earned his M.B.A. from Kelley School of Business at Indiana University.

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Micronics's portraitMicronics's portrait

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Charles “Fred” Battrell, PhD
Chief Technology Officer

Dr. Charles “Fred” Battrell, Ph.D., is Micronics’ Chief Techonlogy Officer,  responsible for overall technical strategy development, including product conceptualization and integration of technologies from Micronics and others,  technology transfer and intellectual property management.   During his tenure at Micronics, Dr. Battrell has directed engineering and production teams, and coordinated new product development initiatives for both Micronics and its partners. He has also served as Principal Investigator on several NIH and DOD funded projects, as well as Co-PI on the Grand Challenges in Global Health award from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for the advancement of a near patient, low cost immuno and nucleic acid assay-based point of care diagostic platform.

Prior to joining Micronics in 1999, Dr. Battrell worked in management and technical leadership roles at Procter and Gamble for approximately 15 years; there he spearheaded numerous global technology development efforts in support of product commercialization. He also served as a new venture technology assessment expert  on behalf of Tredegar Corporation, a leading provider of plastic films and aluminum extrusions.

Dr. Batrell is a named inventor on eighteen patents and has a number of patent applications pending. He holds a B.S. in Chemisty and Mathematics from Alderson-Broaddus College and a Ph.D. in Surface Chemistry from Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University.

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Instrumentation, Imaging, Image Guided Therapy

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Anthony J. Alleman
Vice President, Operations

Mr. Alleman is a retired United States Navy officer with a distinguished career that included service on submarines, nuclear power engineering, and senior leadership positions on operational staffs. Since leaving the Navy, he has worked in private industry in operations and technical project management. At Advanced Inquiry Systems, a Portland, Ore., based startup semiconductor test equipment firm, he built a solely outsourced supply chain for the manufacture of an innovative wafer level test system. He successfully qualified and managed 10 key suppliers and managed the technical liaison to the internal engineering group during the product development phase.

With extensive experience in operational excellence and Six Sigma, he has also served as an adviser for the Northwest Food Processors Innovation & Productivity Center, a not-for-profit organization charged with improving global competitiveness in the $23B food manufacturing industry in Oregon, Washington and Idaho. He has led projects to enhance plant and industry level productivity; projects to encourage technology awareness and transfer for increased innovation; and leadership development efforts with a particular focus on emerging/startup firms.

Mr. Alleman holds a BS in Mechanical Engineering from Oregon State University and an MBA from George Fox University.

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Steve Metz
Director, Ultrasound Investigations

The mission of Ultrasound Investigations is to expand the use of ultrasound in medicine.

Steve is an innovation and advanced development manager with more than 25 years of experience in leading product development teams and managing advanced development projects to integrate breakthrough customer solutions across multiple medical imaging modalities.

Steve has a Master of Science degree in Computer and Electrical Engineering from Marquette University, with BS degrees in Mathematics and Physics.

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Clayton Young
Systems Engineer

Clayton Young is a systems engineer at Physio-Control where he is currently focused on the development of new defibrillator/monitor products.  Much of his career has been centered on the development of medical device technologies applicable to critical care and resuscitation.  Prior to Physio-Control, Clayton served as a member of the technical staff at Edwards Lifesciences, where he was involved in the development of minimally-invasive approaches to evaluate the optical properties of blood.  He also served at GE Global Research and the Institute of Critical Care Medicine, focusing on monitoring technologies to improve the standard of pre-hospital care.  Clayton received his Master of Science degree in biomedical engineering from the University of Southern California and his Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering from San Jose State University.

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Molecular & Cellular Engineering

Mr. Kranda has over 25 years of biotech operating, finance and corporate development experience. Most recently Mr. Kranda was CEO of Vaccinogen, a cancer vaccine company. Mr. Kranda served as Managing Director of Vulcan Capital for several years, where he led all aspects of their Life Sciences investment efforts and continues to represent them on the PTC board of directors. Mr. Kranda was also the CEO of Oxford GlycoSciences, a pioneer in proteomic based drug and diagnostic product development. Mr. Kranda started his biotech career at Immunex Corporation where he served as President, COO and Director. Mr. Kranda holds a BA and MBA in finance from the University of Washington.

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S. Sethu K. Reddy, MD
Medical Solutions, Merck Customer Centricity

Dr. Sethu Reddy works in Medical Solutions, Merck Customer Centricity, at Merck & Co. He joined Merck in 2006, having been past-Chairman of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism at the Cleveland Clinic.

Dr. Reddy earned his MD in 1980 at the Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada. He completed his fellowship in endocrinology and metabolism at the U. of Toronto. His research fellowship in cellular and molecular physiology was conducted at Harvard Medical School/Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. Prior to joining the Cleveland Clinic, he was Associate Professor of Medicine and Biochemistry at Dalhousie University, Canada. He completed his MBA at Cleveland State University in 2002.

Dr. Reddy’s research interests are primarily devoted to clinical endocrinology, including obesity and thyroid disorders, and the epidemiology of diabetes and its complications. He has authored and coauthored more than 140 articles, abstracts, and book chapters concerning these and related topics. He has presented numerous lectures about diabetes management, heart disease, obesity, thyroid disease, and other metabolic disorders at national and international events.

He conceived and developed the nationally recognized Annual Endocrinology Board Review Course since 1997.

Dr. Reddy has been actively involved in clinically relevant projects with AACE since 1996, including Coding & Reimbursement, Fellowship Training, Optimal Practice of Diabetes Task Force, Endocrine University Program, Socioeconomic Affair, Minority Health Affairs, Clinical Practice Guidelines, and Academic Affairs. He has been elected twice to the National Board of Directors of AACE. He has also been actively involved in corporate liaison activities with The Endocrine Society, American Diabetes Association and The Obesity Society.

He was also honored with the Florence Nightingale Award by Cleveland Clinic for Physician Collaboration and as Trustee of the Year in 2005 by the Diabetes Association of Greater Cleveland.  In 2009, he authored the Cleveland Clinic Guide to Diabetes (Kaplan Pub.) for the general public.

In 2007, he received the distinction of Mastership in the American College of Endocrinology.

 

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Gautam Nayar
Principal Scientist, Bioprocess Department

Coming soon!

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Technology for Expanding Access to Healthcare

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Sailesh Chutani, PhD
CEO and Co-founder

Sailesh has 25 years of experience in creating successful new businesses and products. Prior to Mobisante, he managed $100m worth of exploratory research investments in emerging technologies to identify and seed new businesses at Microsoft. He also led the turnaround of the WebTV acquisition into a profitable business, launching multiple new product and services with revenues that peaked at $220m. He has had business and technical leadership roles in companies such as Hewlett-Packard, Oracle and Transarc – a startup acquired by IBM that became a billion dollar business.

Sailesh has championed cell phone technologies in healthcare since 2005 and he co-authored the book, “Technology at the Margins” that takes a global view of the impact of the mobile phone on healthcare, education, micro-finance and resource management.

Sailesh has a PhD from Ecole polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland, a Master’s degree from University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and a Bachelor in Technology from IIT, Kanpur in India, all in Computer Science.

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Anurag Mairal, PhD
Global Program Leader, Technology Solutions

Anurag Mairal is Program Leader, Technology Solutions Global Program at PATH. Dr. Mairal provides strategic leadership and technical guidance to projects that focus on technologies for diagnostics; maternal, neonatal and reproductive health; water and sanitation; health management information systems; and vaccines and immunisations. He holds the following degrees: MBA, University of California, Berkeley; PhD, Chemical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder; MS, Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay.

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Mary-Pierre Waiss
President, CEO, Co-Founder

Mary-Pierre Waiss has over 25 years of experience in the field of non-invasive cardiac imaging. In her most recent endeavor as Vice President of Clinical Affairs at VentriPoint Diagnostics, she developed a highly specialized clinical team tasked with intellectual property development, clinical trials, luminary development and customer training. Prior to her time at VentriPoint, she was a research scientist in the Cardiovascular Research Lab at the University of Washington where the technology licensed by VentriPoint was developed. Ms. Waiss is a member of the American Heart Association and a Fellow of the American Society of Echocardiography.

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Systems, Synthetic & Quantitative Biology

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Randal Bass, PhD
Director, Process and Product Development

Randal is the director of the Analytical Sciences Department in Washington within the company’s Process and Product Development (P&PD) organization in R&D.  Randal is responsible for analytical methods to develop and release Amgen’s protein therapeutics, as well as the detailed bioanalytical characterization required to understand their properties. Randal has worked at Amgen leading teams of process development scientists working on clinical stage molecules, as well as providing detailed analytical work on molecules such as Enbrel™.  Randal received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from University of Colorado and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the California Institute of Technology in X-ray crystallography.

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Ilya Shmulevich, PhD
Professor, ISB

Ilya Shmulevich received his PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, in 1997. His graduate research was in the area of nonlinear signal processing, with a focus on the theory and design of nonlinear digital filters, Boolean algebra, lattice theory, and applications to music pattern recognition. From 1997-1998, he was a postdoctoral researcher at the Nijmegen Institute for Cognition and Information at the University of Nijmegen and National Research Institute for Mathematics and Computer Science at the University of Amsterdam in The Netherlands, where he studied computational models of music perception and recognition, focusing on tonality induction and rhythm complexity. In 1998-2000, he worked as a senior researcher at the Tampere International Center for Signal Processing at the Signal Processing Laboratory in Tampere University of Technology, Tampere, Finland. While in Tampere, he did research in nonlinear systems, image recognition and classification, image correspondence, computational learning theory, multiscale and spectral methods, and statistical signal processing.

This background proved to be fruitful for undertaking problems in computational biology at a time when genomic technologies were beginning to produce large amounts of data. In 2001, he joined the Department of Pathology at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center as an Assistant Professor and held an adjunct faculty appointment in the Department of Statistics in Rice University. His work in cancer genomics research spans multiple cancers, with published work in glioma, lymphoma, leukemia, breast cancer, ovarian cancer and sarcoma. He and his colleagues developed statistical approaches for cancer classification, diagnosis and prognosis, and applied them to the study of of metastasis, cancer progression and tumor heterogeneity. Together with long-standing collaborators Edward R. Dougherty (Texas A&M University) and Wei Zhang (M.D. Anderson Cancer Center), he co-developed the model class of probabilistic Boolean networks (PBNs), which was applied to the study of gene regulatory networks in cancer.

Dr. Shmulevich joined the ISB faculty in 2005 where he is currently a Professor. He directs a Genome Data Analysis Center as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, a comprehensive and coordinated effort to accelerate our understanding of the molecular basis of cancer through the application of genome analysis technologies, including large-scale genome sequencing. He also directs the Computational Core of the Systems Approach to Immunity and Inflammation consortium, which consists of a large multidisciplinary team of investigators working in the fields of immunology and systems biology. These projects entail the development of computational and mathematical approaches for modeling biological systems and analyzing large-scale measurement data sets. Dr. Shmulevich’s research interests also include theoretical studies of complex systems, including information theoretic approaches, as well as the application of image processing and analysis to high-throughput cellular imaging.

Dr. Shmulevich is a co-editor or co-author of six books in the areas of computational biology. He holds Affiliate Professor appointments in the Departments of Bioengineering and Electrical Engineering at the University of Washington, Department of Signal Processing in Tampere University of Technology, Finland, and Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering in Strathclyde University, Glasgow, UK.

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Brian Bot
Senior Scientist and Community Manager

Brian is a Senior Scientist and Community Manager at Sage Bionetworks, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to exploring open source models in the advancement of biomedical research in Seattle, Washington. Brian received a BS at the University of Minnesota in Statistics and worked as a Biostatistician at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN for 7 years. Brian’s extensive experience in working with clinical and genomic data, combined with his passion for exploring innovative ways to make science more open and transparent guided him to Sage Bionetworks.

Brian’s current projects involve implementing strategies and technologies for making complex genomic data more usable and accessible to the community, and re-envisioning how scientists communicate complex genomic science to one another and to the public at large.

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BioE Curriculum Forum

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Wendy Thomas, PhDRead More »

Associate Professor
Vice Chair of Academic Affairs
Department of Bioengineering

Dr. Wendy Thomas received her Ph.D. in 2003 in Bioengineering from the University of Washington. Before this she earned a BA in Molecular Biology from Princeton University, worked at Howard Hughes Medical Institute studying Biochemistry, and earned a Master’s Degree in Applied Mathematics. She joined the faculty in the Dept. of Bioengineering at the University of Washington in 2004 where she is now an Associate Professor. At the University of Washington, she is also a member of the Biological Physics, structure and Design program, the Molecular and Cellular Biology Graduate Program, and the Institute for Molecular Engineering, and holds an Adjunct faculty position in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Dr. Thomas studies the regulation of adhesion proteins, with particular emphasis on mechanical and allosteric regulation. Her work focuses on platelet adhesion in thrombosis and on bacterial adhesions in commensal and pathogenic bacteria. Her research group studies the fundamental biophysics of these systems, and applies the knowledge to engineer novel adhesive technologies. Dr. Thomas also maintains strong commitments to teaching students to integrate rigorous quantitative analysis into various bioengineering topics, and to mentoring diverse trainees to succeed in research and in their career goals. Her students have entered top medical schools and graduate schools in science or engineering, have obtained positions in companies, and pursued law, business, and journalism degree.

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Assistant Professor
Chair of Curriculum Committee
Department of Bioengineering

Daniel M. Ratner trained in carbohydrate chemistry and microarray fabrication at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with Professor Peter Seeberger, where he received his PhD in Synthetic Organic Chemistry. He subsequently joined the Section of Infectious Diseases at Boston Medical Center / Boston University as an NRSA Postdoctoral Fellow with the Training Program in Host-Pathogen Interactions. In September 2007 he became a member of the faculty of the University of Washington as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Bioengineering. The Ratner laboratory is developing new chemical and biophysical tools to probe carbohydrate-mediated interaction using SPR and silicon photonic biosensors.

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Senior Lecturer
Capstone Project Coordinator

Dr. Christopher Neils received his Bachelor’s degree in aeronautics and astronautics from MIT in 1990, and worked as a nuclear propulsion engineer at Naval Reactors until 1995. After earning his Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from The University of Texas at Austin, he joined UW Bioengineering in 2001 as a post-doctoral fellow and transitioned to full-time instruction in the undergraduate Bioengineering program in 2006. He teaches signals, circuits, and mechanics courses, and shares leadership of the bioengineering capstone courses.

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Alyssa Taylor, PhDRead More »

Full Time Lecturer
Capstone Project Coordinator
Department of Bioengineering

Dr. Alyssa C. Taylor is a lecturer in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Washington. She received a B.S. in biological systems engineering at the University of California, Davis, and a Ph.D. in biomedical engineering at the University of Virginia. Taylor’s teaching activities are focused on developing and teaching core introductory courses and technical labs for bioengineering undergraduates, as well as coordinating the Capstone Design sequence. Taylor currently pursues educational research and continuous improvement activities, with the ultimate goal of optimizing bioengineering curriculum design and undergraduate student learning outcomes.

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Lead Academic Counselor
Department of Bioengineering

Kelli Jayn Nichols came to the Department of Bioengineering in October of 2000 and implemented the then-new BS Bioengineering degree program. She helped admit the first cohort of students in Spring 2001 and has advised every BS BIOE cohort since then. She directs the Department’s Academic Services unit, participates actively in curriculum development and revision, and teaches the senior Honors leadership seminar. Professional interests include pedagogy, program design, integrating writing into the curriculum, and transition to career. She holds an MA in English Literature from Purdue University.

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UW Bioengineering students interested in presenting a poster during this year’s Fall Open House event are asked to submit an abstract to uwbioeap@uw.edu.

The submission deadline is:
Friday, August 23, 2013

A one-page abstract format is required. The abstract should include:

  • Project title
  • Student name, class standing, major(s)
  • Mentor (PI) name and department
  • Introduction
  • Description of the materials and methods used
  • Study results (including up to one figure)

During the submission process, either on the abstract page or in the e-mail, please indicate the most appropriate core research area from the list provided:

  • Biomaterials & Regenerative Medicine
  • Instrumentation, Imaging & Image-Guided Therapy
  • Molecular & Cellular Engineering
  • Systems, Synthetic & Quantitative Biology
  • Technology for Expanding Access to Healthcare

Be part of UW Bioengineering’s first Career Fair! This Career Fair, dedicated to companies and organizations in the bioengineering and biomedical field, gives companies their own opportunity to gain visibility, meet our students and share information about your organization’s mission and goals. Meet potential interns and future employees. Students in the Department of Bioengineering have expressed high interest in learning more about companies and pursuing careers in industry.

Schedule
UW BioE Fall Open House Career Fair
Tuesday, September 24, 2013
*12:30pm – 2:45pm

* Please note that prior to the Career Fair there will be a BioE Curriculum Forum panel discussion led by our BioE Core Faculty curriculum committee.  Therefore, we encourage all career fair participants to register for the full conference.

Location
University of Washington
South Campus Center Room 316

Audience
BioE Post-Doctoral Students, BioE Graduate Students, BioE Undergraduate Students, Pre-Engineering Students

Table Fees
There is no cost to host a table.  The only fees associated with this year’s event is the event registration fee of $25.00 which covers parking and lunch.

Table Specifications
Participating companies are provided with the following items:

  • 1 6’ table (Additional tables are available upon request )
  • Wireless Internet Access, with IT support
  • 2 chairs
  • 2 bottles of water

Audio-Visual
If you have audio/visual need please contact UW BioE-AP staff at uwbioeap@uw.edu

Shipping Information
Companies are strongly encouraged to send their packages as soon as they become available. Please make sure that all packages for the UW BioE Career Fair ARRIVE between:

August  19, 2013 – September 18. 2013

Shipping Address
Please have your company name prominently ON THE PACKAGE so that they can be distributed to your table.

Via USPS (UW Mailing Services will return anything without a box #):
John Doe
University of Washington
Department of BioE/Open House
Box# 355061
Seattle WA 98195-5061

Via FedEx/UPS:
John Doe
University of Washington
Department of BioE/Open House
Foege N361D
3720 15th Ave NE
Seattle WA 98195

Return Service After the Fair
There will be shipping service available on the day of the Career Fair to help you ship packages back to company offices.

To ship your packages from the Career Fair, we will organize a FedEx pick-up after the Fair.

Please bring the following:
(1) Your company’s account
(2) Address labels for your company (only one shipping order is needed per group of shipments, but EACH PACKAGE must be individually addressed!)

UW BioE Career Fair will supply the shipping orders, as well as have volunteers on hand to make the process as easy as possible.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at uwbioeap@uw.edu

Companies and organizations interested in hosting a booth at the Career Fair should complete the following online form:

Request for Information

The Fall Open House is designed for:

  • Research scientists and engineers of life sciences companies
  • Biomedical & Biotechnology HR representatives, hiring managers and recruiters (If you hire or would be interested in hiring UW Bioengineering students)
  • Small and large molecules companies
  • Platform companies
  • Technology and instrumentation companies
  • Personalized medicine companies
  • Molecular diagnostic companies
  • Drug delivery companies
  • Global health innovators
  • Venture capital, corporate venture, corporate business development and angel investors
  • UW Bioengineering Alumni
  • K-!2 science teachers interested in learning more about the Bioengineering field
  • People interested in learning what is happening today at the interface between medicine and engineering

 

Directions to University of Washington (Seattle Campus) Gatehouse #1

From I-5 (Northbound or South Bound)

  • Do not use the express lanes.
  • Take Exit #169 (UW — NE 45th St. Exit).
  • Go east (right turn from I-5 north, left turn from I-5 south) on NE 45th for about .5 mile.
  • Turn right on 15th Ave. NE and continue for several blocks to NE 41st St. Schmitz Hall is on the right (west) side of 15th Ave.
  • To park in the underground Central Plaza Parking Garage, turn left at NE 41st.

From the east side of Lake Washington via SR 520 (the floating bridge)

  • Take SR 520 (the floating bridge) westbound toward Seattle.
  • Take the Montlake Blvd. NE exit.
  • Turn right (north) onto Montlake Blvd. and cross the Montlake Bridge.
  • Just past the bridge, turn left on Pacific Ave. and continue west for several blocks past the UW Medical Center and Health Sciences complex on your left.
  • Turn right at 15th Ave. NE and continue north about three blocks to NE 41st St.
  • Schmitz Hall is on the left (west) side of 15th Ave.
  • To park in the underground Central Plaza Parking Garage, turn right on NE 41st.

Parking

  • Parking has been arranged in the Central Plaza Garage.
    Enter the Central Plaza Garage at Gate #1:
    (15th & 41st Avenue -Underground parking)
  • Upon arrival, just tell the parking attendant :
    We have arranged parking under “BioE Open House”.

The University is committed to ensuring that its programs and facilities are accessible to people with disabilities. Planning ahead is essential to minimize difficulties. For more information or assistance please contact uwbioeap@uw.edu

Event Check-in #1: 8:30am-11:00am
Johnson Hall 102 (Lobby area)

Event Check-in #2: After 11:00am
W.H. Foege Building (1st Floor Lobby)

Pdf Event Map Link