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    UW start-up company, MicroGREEN Polymers, takes recycling to a new level

    A UW spin-off company is on a mission to create a greener cup for your coffee and more environmentally friendly containers for your food. MicroGREEN Polymers, Inc., based in Arlington, Washington, is developing an expanded plastic made from recyclable water bottles (PET). The patented technology, created in the laboratory of Mechanical Engineering Associate Professor Vipin Kumar, creates billions of microcellular bubbles in solid thermoplastics toView More

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    Research could lead to more accurate testing for coronary artery disease

    Some 150 million blood lipid panels are done annually in the U.S. to assess levels of cholesterol, high-density (HDL “good”) and low-density (LDL “bad”) lipoproteins, and other substances that affect risk for coronary artery disease – the leading cause of death in the U.S. For the 80 percent of the population with levels in a broad range of normal, these tests are as accurate inView More

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    Software start-up Corensic sees a big future

    The 2008 economic downturn didn’t stop two UW Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) faculty members from launching a software start-up. And it didn’t discourage Madrona Venture Group and WRF Capital from investing $1.5 million in Corensic. The founders, investors, and the UW Center for Commercialization believe the fledgling company has great promise because its products will ensure that complex programs work more reliably. Professor MarkView More

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    Clinic’s pilot project taps into health care system inefficiencies

    America’s health care system is regularly in the news, with calls for increasing efficiency and effectiveness, expanding access, and reigning in escalating costs. Every health care dollar must be spent responsibly. Mental health and substance abuse problems affect one in four adults in the U.S. each year, and providers seek ways to demonstrate the effectiveness of their interventions to consumers, agencies, and third-party payers. AView More

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    Applying mathematics in the fight against cancer

    Treatments for malignant brain tumors (glioma) vary little from one patient to the next and are limited to radiation, surgery, and drugs that often cause debilitating side effects with modest survival improvement. Mathematics might seem an unlikely addition to the mix, but could provide a powerful new tool enabling more accurate prognosis and more personalized treatment that could improve quality of care and of life.View More

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    A new approach in the treatment of drinking water

    In the industrialized world, drinking water undergoes a rigorous purification process to remove harmful contaminants. In the developing world, more than a billion people lack access to clean, safe drinking water. Mark Benjamin, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, is using a common water treatment additive, aluminum oxide, in an innovative new way to improve conventional water filtration processes. In laboratory studies Benjamin heated aluminumView More

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    Researcher’s skill set tackles monitoring of abnormal heart rhythms

    David Linker is a UW cardiologist with engineering training and the technical chops to invent a device to improve monitoring and diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common abnormality in heart rhythm. The UW Center for Commercialization began working with Linker in 2004, providing a Commercialization Gap Fund award to develop a prototype device and identifying additional support from the Washington Research Foundation. FiveView More

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    Image Analysis Technology Helps Prevent Strokes

    More than 15 years of UW research to identify patients at high risk for a stroke has matured into technology now exclusively licensed to a UW start-up company, VPDiagnostics. The Seattle company received a $2.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to fund a multi-center clinical study to evaluate use of the technology in more than 300 patients. MRI-PlaqueView is image-processing softwareView More

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    New Material Extends the Life of Touch Screen Devices

    If the letter “e” goes dead on the touch screen of an iPhone, Tablet PC, or other mobile device, a recycling or trash bin is the next stop. A supermarket touch screen wears out after about 50,000 uses. Alex Jen, Professor and Chair of Materials Science and Engineering, is developing new technology to extend the durability of these products, no small goal given the burgeoningView More