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    Breakthrough Test for Bone Loss Stands Test of Time

    More than 10 million adults in the United States have osteoporosis — weak, brittle bones vulnerable to fracture. Another 35 million have low bone density that can progress to osteoporosis. Health care costs for osteoporosis-related fractures total about $20 billion annually in the U.S., and are rising with our aging population. Most people have no symptoms of the disease and may receive no treatment toView More

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    Neurosurgeon and Bioengineer Aim for Paradigm Shift in Treatment of Hydrocephalus

    Advances in medical technology and surgical techniques have dramatically improved diagnosis and treatment of most disorders, saving and extending lives. Yet the technology revolution has bypassed a simple device used for 50 years to treat a relatively common but devastating condition in newborns — hydrocephalus, the excess accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. If this fluid is not continuously drained through a catheter and shunt system, the pressure buildup can damage brain tissue and expand the skull bones leading to fatal consequences. Continue reading View More

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    CSE Professor Seeks to Transform Home-Monitoring Technology

    A new class of low-cost and easy-to-deploy sensing systems for homes being developed at the UW could revolutionize home monitoring, alerting homeowners to humidity or moisture in the attic, plumbing that could spring a leak, or the presence of carbon monoxide. The system employs UW Assistant Professor Shwetak Patel’s Ubicomp research lab technology. Patel joined UW as an assistant professor in both Computer Science andView More

  • Dance Method DVD Expands a Teacher’s Audience

    “When are you going to make a video?” is a question Jennifer Salk, MFA, associate professor in the University of Washington dance program would get often from dance teachers attending her master classes and workshops. An expert in weaving anatomy instruction into dance technique classes, Salk has taught at the American Dance Festival, the International Association for Dance Medicine and Science, and National Dance EducationView More

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    UW Start-Up Nimbic Accelerates Design Solutions for Microelectronics Companies

    UW electrical engineering professor Vikram Jandhyala launched the start-up company Nimbic (formerly Physware) in 2006 to help customers in the microelectronics industry solve design problems for microprocessors, FPGAs, memory, wireless RF systems, analog systems, and high-speed serial and parallel channels. The company’s patented physics-aware technology enables efficient chip-package-system co-design and robustness, and efficiency at every step of the design cycle while significantly reducing time toView More

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    Rating System for Sustainable Roadways Gains Traction

    Greenroads, a sustainability rating system for roadway design and construction, is not just taking the road to market, it’s blazing the route. Greenroads is helping turn our highways and byways green with sustainability standards for paving materials and recycling, roadway design, noise and pollution mitigation, and protection of environmentally sensitive areas and natural resources. In just four years, the project evolved from a student’s inspirationView More

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    Start-up Company Focuses on New Approach to Treating Cancer

    When Professor André Lieber first disclosed his novel approach to cancer therapy in 2008, C4C technology manager Angela Loihl immediately recognized it could be “a winner.” Lieber’s team is the only one in the world working to block the action of a key cell surface receptor, CD46, a protein that is active in tumor cells and protects them from being killed by antibodies. The recombinantView More

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    The Bumblebee: UW Lab Creates Tiny and Energy Efficient Wireless Sensor

    In the world of wireless sensors, size matters—and for many applications, the tinier the better. On a quest for the ultra-small and lightweight, Assistant Professor Brian Otis and his electrical engineering research team are pushing sensor technology into new frontiers. Otis’ team has designed a low-power sensor called the Bumblebee that is four times more energy efficient than existing radio circuits, and the noise efficiencyView More

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    UW’s Clean Tech Start-up EnerG2 Takes a Giant Step With “First in the World” Manufacturing Plant

    UW start-up EnerG2, which develops advanced materials for energy storage, is hitting the growth accelerator. The seven-year-old company, with 25 employees in its Seattle headquarters, is progressing to the large-scale manufacturing stage. The company broke ground in August for a $28-million manufacturing plant in Albany, Ore., largely funded by a $21.3-million federal stimulus grant from the Department of Energy. When the high-tech facility goes onlineView More

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    Fate Therapeutics Charts Destiny to World-Leading Stem Cell Company

    Fate Therapeutics is a three-year-old life sciences start-up with fewer than 50 employees, but it has already won high-profile attention. Earlier this year MIT’s Technology Review cited Fate as one of the 50 most innovative companies in the world—alongside Apple, GlaxoSmithKline, and Tesla Motors—for its promising approach to stem cell therapy. And Fate was conceived at UW. Unlike companies that work with embryonic stem cells,View More