Profiles

Sara Jo Breslow (2011)

Sara Jo Breslow is a postdoctoral associate at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Northwest Fisheries Science Center. While in the Environmental Anthropology doctoral program at UW, she participated in the Institute on the Public Humanities in 2008 and the Science Studies Network in 2009. On behalf of the Simpson Center, Amanda Swain recently had the opportunity to talk with Breslow about how she has continued to practice public scholarship since completing her degree. Read more.


Theresa Ronquillo (2006)

Theresa Ronquillo is an Instructional Consultant at the University of Washington’s Center for Teaching & Learning (CTL). She is also the Co-Director of the Interactive Theater as Pedagogy Project, a collaboration of the CTL and Memory War Theater. She holds affiliate faculty positions in the UW School of Social Work and the UW Southeast Asia Center and as Participating Faculty with the UW Center for Performance Studies. While in the Social Work doctoral program, Ronquillo participated in the Simpson Center’s Institute in the Public Humanities in 2006. She currently serves on the steering committee for the Certificate in Public Scholarship. Read more.


Maurice Dolberry (2013)

Maurice Dolberry is the first UW student to complete the graduate Certificate in Public Scholarship (CPS) through the Simpson Center. Dolberry, who entered the program in Fall 2011, completed his Certificate in Spring 2013 with the guidance of his CPS portfolio advisor Ralina Joseph (Communication). This year Dolberry is continuing as a doctoral student in Curriculum & Instruction/Multicultural Education in the UW College of Education. As part of the certificate program, Dolberry worked closely with Joseph and fellow CPS student Melanie Hernandez (English) to lay the groundwork for a sustainable partnership between the Northwest African American Museum (NAAM) and the graduate and undergraduate sections of UW Black Cultural Studies courses. Prior to entering the PhD program, he spent three years as a middle school educator and eight years as a high school educator in various roles, including science teacher, math teacher, dean of students, and director of diversity. Read more.


Anoop Mirpuri (2010)

Currently Assistant Professor of English at Portland State University, Anoop Mirpuri received his PhD in English from the University of Washington in 2010. Prior to joining the faculty at Portland State, he was Assistant Professor of English at Drew University and a research fellow at the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies at University of Virginia. His current research explores the relationship between the history of U.S. racial capitalism, the formation of the radical prison movement in postwar America, and recent debates over the contemporary crisis of mass-incarceration. He is working on a book manuscript, tentatively titled “Articulations of Violence: Race, Punishment, Modernity, and Posthumanism." Read more.


Keith Feldman (2008)

Currently Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, Keith Feldman received his PhD in English from the University of Washington in 2008. His current research centers on theorizing and narrating the many connections between U.S. imperial culture and changing geopolitical engagements with West Asia, North Africa, the Arab and Muslim worlds, and Israel/Palestine. He is working on a book manuscript, "Special Relationships: Israel, Palestine and U.S. Imperial Culture." The Simpson Center recently had the opportunity to talk with Feldman about how he has continued to practice public scholarship since receiving his degree. Read more.


Georgia Roberts (Current)

Currently a lecturer in Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences at the University of Washington, Bothell, Georgia Roberts is completing her PhD in English from the University of Washington. Her research interests are centered on global hip hop culture, American and Comparative Cultural Studies, Critical Race Theory and practical (everyday) conceptions of race, nation and empire. Her dissertation, “Who Killed It: Toward a Hip Hop Theory,” explores the aesthetics of commercial rap music, focusing specifically on the politics of reproduction around race, gender, and sexuality. Read more.