Spring 2014


HUM 597A

African American Political Thought: Freedom, Gender, and Political Action

1 credit, C/NC

Instructor: Habiba Ibrahim (English) and Jack Turner (Political Science)

Location: Communications 202, unless otherwise listed

Meeting Dates:

  • Monday, April 7, 7:00 - 9:00 pm
  • Monday, April 21, 7:00 - 9:00 pm
  • Monday, April 28, 7:00 - 9:00 pm
  • Monday, May 5, 7:00 - 9:00 pm

Time Schedule

*Students are also required to attend at least two of the six sessions of the African American Political Thought conference, Friday, May 2 – Saturday, May 3. For conference details, visit www.simpsoncenter.org/aapt  

African American political thought brings the texts of figures ranging from Frederick Douglass to Toni Morrison into conversation with the abiding concerns of political theory: the meanings of justice, freedom, and equality; the nature of power, obligation, and “the good life.” Out of this encounter comes deeper understanding of African American intellectual traditions as well as enhanced understanding of political theory’s core concepts. Douglass’s autobiographies (1845, 1855, 1893), for example, change our understanding of freedom by giving us a detailed portrait of freedom’s destruction, then its realization. The meaning of freedom emerges against the backdrop of slavery’s horror, providing a vantage point on freedom unavailable in the traditional canon. At the same time, reading Douglass in light of traditional political theory expands our sense of Douglass’ significance.

Offered in conjunction with the conference “African American Political Thought: Past and Present,” taking place May 2-3 at the Simpson Center, this short course gives students an opportunity to engage major texts considered at the conference, and to distill lessons from the conference after it is held. The course will focus on the interrelation between freedom, gender, and political action; readings will include Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Marcus Garvey, Toni Morrison, and Angela Davis.

All students are required to attend at least two of the six conference sessions on May 2-3.


HUM 597B

Project Management for Digital Scholarship

1 credit, C/NC

Instructor: Tyler Fox (UW-IT, Learning Technologies)

Location: Communications 202, unless otherwise listed

Meeting Dates:

  • Monday, April 7, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
  • Monday, April 14, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
  • Monday, April 21, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
  • Monday, April 28, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Time Schedule

This course provides an introduction to project management, with a specific focus on digital projects. Students will engage in a variety of practical and theoretical exercises, readings, and discussion to learn the basics of project management. While we will examine different approaches to project management, the course will focus more on general concepts than any one particular style. Students will learn about core ideas and terminology, project cycles, and tasks associated with various phases of the project life span. Topics such as timelines, scheduling, budgeting, risk management, software tools, and Internet resources will be discussed.

Each week we will work on different aspects of project planning; students are highly encouraged to come with projects that they want to accomplish. We will use student projects as the focus of this course.

Students in this course will develop a project plan for digital humanities research project. Successful completion of this plan is required to receive credit.

Tyler Fox is an instructional technologist in the Learning Technologies division of UW-IT. He has held previous positions as Instructional Technology Director for the UW’s Center for Educational Leadership and as an instructional technologist for Seattle University’s School of Law. He is completing his PhD in Interactive Arts & Technology from Simon Fraser University.