Digital Humanities Commons

The Simpson Center offers annual summer fellowships for faculty and doctoral students to pursue research projects that use digital technologies in innovative and intensive ways and/or explore the historical, social, aesthetic, and cross-cultural implications of digital cultures. Inspired by the value of open access, this annual program is called the Digital Humanities Commons. It has three primary goals:

  • To animate knowledge—using rich media, dynamic databases, and visualization tools
  • To circulate knowledge—among diverse publics
  • To understand digital culture—historically, theoretically, aesthetically, and generatively

UW faculty and dissertators are eligible to apply either on an individual basis or in teams to the Digital Humanities Commons every fall. Where research in the humanities is often undertaken by a single scholar, the Commons enables faculty and graduate students to collaborate with each other on projects as well as with designers, information technologists, and librarians. Applications from scholars using the open source multimodal authoring and publishing platform Scalar are particularly encouraged; the Simpson Center is an affiliate of the Alliance for Networking Visual Culture, which developed Scalar. Review additional eligibility and application information.

Up to 8 scholars—4 faculty and 4 doctoral students—will be selected each year; they will be required to be in residence for 6-8 weeks during the summer and will meet weekly to share their research. In addition to summer salary, each will have a research budget that can be used for expenses such as hourly support and software. See a list of current Digital Humanities Commons fellows.

The Advisory and Selection Committee for the 2014 Digital Humanities Commons consists of Kirsten Foot (Communication), Tyler Fox (Information Technology), Ray Jonas (History), Ann Lally (Digital Initiatives, UW Libraries), Brian Reed (English), and Kathleen Woodward (Simpson Center).

See examples of current and past Center-funded digital humanities projects, as well as a list of digital humanities campus resources.

The Simpson Center gratefully acknowledges the support of a National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation as well as many donors to the endowment which is underwriting these fellowships.