Introduction

Governor Gregoire Keynote
Dr. Joe Gaydos Keynote

Oral Presentations

Poster Presentations
Speaker Biographies
Public Forum
Student Award Winners
Press Summary
Conference Co-Sponsors
Advisory Committee
Conference Program Booklet
Photo Gallery
Georgia Basin Action Plan
Puget Sound Action Team
2005 Research Conference Home


Proceedings of the 2005 Puget Sound Georgia Basin Research Conference

Speaker Biographies

A

Lee Ann Acker
Undergraduate Student
University of Washington, Tacoma
12517 107th Ave Ct E
Puyallup, WA 98402
leeacker@comcast.net
Tel: (253) 307-4148
Fax: (253) 307-4148

The Effect of Heavy Metal Pollution in Aquatic Environments on Metallothionein Production in Mytilus sp. (A10)

Lee Ann Acker is an undergraduate student in the Environmental Science program at the University of Washington, Tacoma.  Her primary research interests are species diversity in tropical rain forests and restoration ecology.  After graduation in June 2005, Lee Ann will continue in restoration by interning as a Range Technician at the Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center with Dr. Jane Mangold.

Sandra Aasen
Washington State Department of Ecology
Environmental Assessment Program
Olympia, WA
sgei461@ecy.wa.gov

Sediment Quality in the San Juan Islands, Eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca, and Admiralty Inlet  (P2)

Sediment Quality in Hood Canal  P2)

Sandra Aasen is an environmental specialist for the Washington State Department of Ecology’s Coastal and Estuarine Assessment Unit, working as a member of the unit’s Marine Sediment Monitoring Team (MSMT) since 1994 conducting the Sediment Component of the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program (PSAMP). Ms Aasen received her Master of Science degree from Evergreen State College in 1997.

Tim W. Abbe
Herrera Environmental Consultants
2200 Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100
Seattle, WA 98121
tabbe@herrerainc.com
Tel: 206 - 441- 9080
Fax: 206 - 441- 9108
URL: http://www.herrerainc.com/

Bulkheading in Thurston County: Impacts on Forage Fish Spawning Habitat (A7)

Tim is currently Director of River and Coastal Geomorphology at Herrera Environmental Consultants in Seattle, WA. Tim received his MS degree from Portland State University and his PhD from the University of Washington. Over the last 20 years Tim has worked in academics, government and the private sector on issues such as sediment transport, shoreline erosion, the effects of riparian vegetation, geologic hazards, and habitat restoration. Tim's has studied shoreline processes and tidal wetlands up and down the west coast, including the Lower Columbia River, Grays Harbor, Puget Sound, and numerous locations along the California Coast. Currently his work tends to focus on evaluating geomorphic processes that threaten infrastructure, the role of development in habitat degradation, and presenting sustainable solutions to protect people and the environment.

Marina Alberti
Associate Professor of Urban Design and Planning
University of Washington
410 Gould Box 355740
Seattle, WA 98195-5740
malberti@u.washington.edu
Tel: 206-616-8667
Fax: 206-685-9597
URL: www.urbaneco.washington.edu

Developing Landscape Benchmarks to Monitor Urban Growth in Puget Sound (F7)

Marina Alberti is Associate professor of Urban and Environmental Planning in the Department of Urban Design and Planning at the University of Washington. She teaches courses in Urban Ecology, Environmental Impact Management, Geographic Information Systems, and Group Dynamic and Conflict resolution. Her research interests are in the impacts of alternative urban development patterns on ecosystem dynamics. She is currently directing a NSF funded research project aimed to study how changes in land use alter the biophysical structure and affect ecosystem dynamics in the Puget Sound region. She is also developing a simulation model that integrates urban development and ecological dynamics.

Storrs “Skip” L. Albertson
WA State Dept. of Ecology
EAP
Olympia, WA
alberts@ocean.washington.edu

Principle Component Analysis for Uniqueness in Puget Sound Hydrographic Stations (1989-2003) - Let the Data Speak! (E7)

Skip Albertson, P.E., is an Environmental Engineer and Physical Oceanographer for the Washington State Department of Ecology. His work includes applying a modeling approach towards understanding water quality data including TMDLs, circulation studies, residual flow and residence time evaluations.

Diana M. Allen
Associate Professor and Chair
Department of Earth Sciences
Simon Fraser University
8888 University Drive
Burnaby, BC  V5A 1S6 Canada
dallen@sfu.ca
Tel: 604-291-3967
Fax: 604-291-4198
URL:  http://www.sfu.ca/earth-sciences

Modeled Climate Change Impacts in the Abbotsford-Sumas Aquifer, Central Fraser Lowland of BC, Canada and Washington State, US. (E3)

Dr. Diana Allen (P.Geo) is an Associate Professor of hydrogeology at Simon Fraser University. Her research involves characterizing aquifers using geophysical, geochemical and isotopic techniques and numerical modeling. She is currently working collaboratively with federal, provincial, regional government and industry partners on several projects including the hydrogeology of the Gulf Islands (geochemistry and fractured rock aquifer characterization), the Abbotsford aquifer (nitrate contamination), and Okanagan Basin (recharge and impact of climate change on groundwater resources).

Eric M. Anderson
University of Wyoming
Dept. of Zoology and Physiology
Laramie WY
emander@uwyo.edu

The value of herring spawning events to spring conditioning of scoters in the Puget Sound Georgia Basin (A5)

Eric Anderson received a B.S. in biology and mathematics from the University of Puget Sound in 1994, and an M.S. in Zoology and Physiology from the University of Wyoming in 2002. Eric has worked as a research associate with the Teton Science School and The Nature Conservancy and is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Zoology and Physiology at the University of Wyoming.

Joseph Anderson
University of Washington
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences
Seattle, WA
joeander@u.washington.edu

Above the dam: salmon colonization in the Cedar River, Washington (A3)

Joseph Anderson earned a B.S. in Biological Sciences from Stanford University in 2001, with a research focus on developmental genetics. He investigated steelhead trout population genetics as a technician for the NOAA Fisheries molecular ecology team in Santa Cruz, CA in 2002-03. Mr. Anderson is currently a graduate student in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington, and is interested in the evolutionary ecology of salmonid fishes.

Roger G. Anderson
Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Seattle, WA
andersrg@battelle.org

Application of NASA Earth Science Data to Landscape-Scale Resource Management Needs in the Pacific Northwest: An Institutional Collaboration (P4)

Roger Anderson is a Senior Program Manager for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.  He directs programs focused on environmental technologies, natural resources, sustainable development and institutional capacity building.  Mr. Anderson presently serves as Program Manager for the Pacific Northwest Regional Collaboratory, a collaborative effort among four universities and two national laboratories to develop applications of NASA data to address critical issues in Water and land resources management and sustainable development in the Pacific Northwest.

Roland C. Anderson
Seattle Aquarium - Life Sciences
Seattle, WA
roland.anderson@seattle.gov

The Annual Census of Giant Pacific octopuses in Puget Sound (P1)

Roland C. Anderson, Ph.D., is a biologist at the Seattle Aquarium where he has worked for 27 years. He is particularly interested in the natural history and behavior of Puget Sound cephalopods. He has published numerous articles on marine invertebrates of the Pacific Northwest in scientific journals and the trade press. He has participated in numerous conferences, giving talks on the behavior of cephalopods and other mollusks.

Lucy Applegate
Outreach Coordinator
Skagit Fisheries Enhancement Group
PO Box 2497 Mount Vernon, WA 98273
lapplegate@skagitfisheries.org
Tel: 360-336-0172
Fax: 360-336-0701
URL: www.skagitfisheries.org

Stream Stewards A Community Stream Awareness Program (P6)

Lucy Applegate holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Natural Resources from the Ohio State University, and has worked with SFEG since 1999.  Before moving to Washington, Lucy worked as a naturalist in Ohio, conducting interpretive programs for children and adults.  Lucy’s responsibilities as Outreach Coordinator include recruiting, training, and managing volunteers for habitat restoration projects, and conducting educational programs throughout the community.  Lucy teams with volunteers and other educators to design and present programs to adult civic groups and student groups in grades K-12.  She also manages SFEG’s website, and production of The Redd, SFEG’s newsletter.

Jessica Archer
Washington State BEACH Database Coordinator
Washington State Department of Ecology
300 Desmond Dr SE, Lacey
PO Box 47710
Olympia, WA 98504-7710
jarc461@ecy.wa.gov
Tel: (360) 407-6159
Fax: (360) 407-6884
URL: http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/eap/beach/

The Beach Environmental Assessment, Communication, and Health (BEACH) Program: Results and Trends from 2004 (B1)

Jessica Archer graduated from The Evergreen State College in 2002 with a B.S. focused on marine molecular biology and geographic information systems. She currently works at the Department of Ecology as the Washington State BEACH Database Coordinator compiling information on Washington’s marine beaches to identify beaches which are most at risk and data-streaming sample results from these sites to a large EPA database. Her interests include the study of marine systems including the relationship between levels of microbiological indicators and human illness rates for marine waters and improving and stream-lining the management and analysis of marine data.

B

Peter Bahls
Northwest Watershed Institute
Port Townsend WA
peter@nwwatershed.org

High straying rates of hatchery coho in upper Hood Canal tributaries (A3)

Links, chains and witness trees - using historical research to guide watershed restoration (F7)

Peter Bahls earned an M.S. in Fisheries Science and Aquatic Ecology from Oregon State University, worked for six years as the habitat biologist for the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe, 3 years as the senior fish biologist for David Evans and Associates, and has served as the founding director of Northwest Watershed Institute (NWI) since 2001. NWI is a nonprofit organization that provides scientific and technical assistance for watershed restoration.

Robin W. Baird
Cascadia Research Collective
Olympia, WA
rwbaird@cascadiaresearch.org

Diving behavior of "southern resident" killer whales in the trans-boundary waters of British Columbia and Washington: implications for foraging ecology (A2)

Robin W. Baird has undertaken research on cetaceans in the trans-boundary region in 15 of the last 19 years. His Ph.D. (from Simon Fraser University, 1994) focused on foraging ecology of “transient” killer whales in the trans-boundary region. While most of his current research focuses on ecology and population assessment of Hawaiian odontocetes, he is continuing his studies of the foraging ecology of killer whales around the San Juan Islands.

David H.Baldwin
NOAA Fisheries, NWFSC
EC Division
Seattle, WA
david.baldwin@noaa.gov

Comparative thresholds for acetylcholinesterase inhibition and behavioral impairment in coho salmon exposed to chlorpyrifos. (P2)

David Baldwin is an ORISE intern at NOAA Fisheries’ Northwest Fisheries Science Center. His research is focused on the sublethal impacts of contaminants on the sensory physiology and behavior of fish. He received his doctorate in Zoology from the University of Washington (Seattle, WA) studying the physiology and behavior of the visual system of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster).

Greg Bargmann
Washington Dept of Fish and Wildlife
Olympia, WA
bargmggb@dfw.wa.gov

Management of Forage Fish in Puget Sound and the Georgia Basin (A7)

Greg Bargmann is Marine Fish Manager for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife where he has worked for the past 30 years on management of marine fish populations and fisheries.

Russel L. Barsh
Center for the Study of Coast Salish Environments
Anacortes WA
rbarsh@samishtribe.nsn.us

Archaeological Evidence for Sustainability of Coast Salish Sea Urchin Harvesting (D3)

Russel Barsh is director of the Center for the Study of Coast Salish Environments, established by the Samish Indian Nation to pursue “science for stewardship” in the San Juan archipelago. He studies the impact of indigenous peoples on the structure of Salish Sea ecosystems, and develops tools for identifying the “fingerprints” of early humans in sediments, soils, and middens. He previously taught at the University of Washington, and worked at the United Nations.

Harriet Beale
Acting Director of Programs
Puget Sound Action Team
PO Box 40900
Olympia, WA 98504-0900
hbeale@psat.wa.gov
Tel: 360-725-5442
Fax: 360-725-5456
URL: www.psat.wa.gov

New Approaches to Shellfish Protection in Puget Sound (A8)

Harriet Beale joined the Action Team staff in February 1999 and serves as Acting Director of Programs. Her experience includes work as a planner for Jefferson County and as Water Resources Manager for the Lummi Indian Nation. Harriet has a BA in Geography and Regional Planning and an MS in Geology from Western, Washington University. Her graduate work was in the area of geomorphology, hydrology, and shorelines geology.

Janie Beasley
Swinomish Tribal Member

Swinomish Earth Enhancement Celebrations 2003-2005: The Planning Process (D3)

I am a LaConner School Board Member and Community Resource Committee Chairman for the Early College High School Credits for a grant received through Antioch University.  I volunteer for the Swinomish Recreation Committee; Health, Education & Social Services Committee; Veteran’s Committee and the Earth Day Committee.  My interests are reading, sewing, volunteering at my church and tribal events, and spending time with family and friends.  I have been married for 30 years and the mother of two.

Anne Beaudreau
University of Washington
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences
Seattle, WA
annebeau@u.washington.edu

Diet and prey size spectrum of lingcod (Ophiodon elongatus), a top predator in rocky reefs of the San Juan Archipelago (E5)

Anne Beaudreau completed a Bachelors degree in biology at Harvard University in 2001. Currently, she is a second year Masters student in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington studying under Dr. Timothy Essington. Anne’s research focuses on the role of predation in structuring prey populations in marine reserves and nearby fished areas within the San Juan Archipelago.

Timothy J. Beechie
NW Fisheries Science Center
Watershed Program
Seattle, WA
tim.beechie@noaa.gov

Alteration of channel and ecosystem dynamics downstream of Elwha dams (A1)

Tim Beechie has worked in fisheries resource management since 1985, with experience ranging from assessments of fish populations in West African lakes to studies of land use effects on salmon production. His current research interests include development of process-based habitat restoration strategies, impacts of sediment supply changes on channels and habitat, the formation and evolution of floodplain habitats, and impacts of land uses and dam removal on dynamics of floodplain ecosystems.

Sharon M. Bennett
University of British Columbia
Resource Management and Environmental Studies
Vancouver B.C. Canada
smbennet@interchange.ubc.ca

The Biodegradation of Methanol in the Fraser River (P2)

Sharon Bennett is a MSc student at the University of British Columbia in the Department of Resource Management and Environmental Studies. Her studies have focused mainly on aquatic ecology, water pollution, and integrated assessment. Past work has included working as a Habitat Biologist with Fisheries and Oceans in the habitat management branch in Burlington, Ontario. She has also assisted an interdisciplinary research project in Pacific Rim National Park on the impact of human behaviour on intertidal health.           

Matthew Bernard
USCG Region X Regional Response Team Coordinator
U.S. Coast Guard
D13 Marine Safety
915 2nd Avenue
Seattle, WA 98174
Matthew.P.Bernard@uscg.mil
Tel: 206-220-7215

The Pacific North West Regional Contingency Planning Process (C10)

IH, ASP, REM. Region X Regional Response Team Coordinator for the US Coast Guard. 27 Years experience in environmental management, spill response and planning. Member USCG ICS Incident Management Assist Team. BA in Marine Bilogy U of Delaware and Post graduate work Environmental Managerment U. of Washington.

Helen D. Berry
WA Dept. of Natural Resources
Nearshore Habitat Program, Aquatic Resources Div.
Olympia, WA
helen.berry@wadnr.gov

Using Historical Data to Estimate Changes in Floating Kelp (Nereocystis leutkana and Macrocystis integrifolia) in Puget Sound, Washington (F7)

Helen Berry is a coastal ecologist with the Washington State Department of Natural Resources’ Nearshore Habitat Program, part of the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program. She works on projects that track spatial patterns and temporal trends in littoral habitats in Puget Sound. Research interests include: 1) habitat inventory and classification; 2) aquatic vegetation monitoring, particularly kelp and eelgrass; and 3) biotic community monitoring. She has a Masters in Oceanography from Oregon State University.

Stan Bertold
Superintendent, Environmental Monitoring
Greater Vancouver Regional District
4330 Kingsway
Burnaby, BC. Canada V5H 4G8
Tel: 604-451-6007
Fax: 604-451-6019
Stan.bertold@gvrd.bc.ca

Application of cautions, warnings and triggers to benthos for the GVRD marine WWTP outfalls (B1)

Ecological significance of sediment biotic and geochemical effects related to the Iona WWTP outfall discharge to the Strait of Georgia off Sturgeon Bank (B2)

Stan Bertold is the Superintendent of Environmental Monitoring for the Quality Control Division, Operations and Maintenance Department of the Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD).  www.gvrd.bc.ca

Peter Namtvedt Best
City of Bainbridge Island

Integration of Joint City of Bainbridge Island/Suquamish Tribal Beach Seining Results into Shoreline Management and Salmon Recovery Efforts in Kitsap County, Washington (B9)

Peter Namtvedt Best has a BA from Huxley College at Western Washington University and is a Long-Range Planner for the City of Bainbridge Island working primarily on shoreline management and salmon recovery.

Marc Beutel
Assistant Professor, Environmental Engineering
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
, Washington State University
PO Box 642910, Pullman, WA 99164-2910
mbeutel@wsu.edu
Tel: (509) 335-3721 

Targeted Oxygen Addition to Hood Canal: A Potential Management Strategy to Ameliorate the Impacts of Hypoxia (D6)

Marc Beutel is an Assistant Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering at Washington State University. Marc has extensive experience evaluating the limnology of California lakes and reservoirs with a particular emphasis on quantifying internal nutrient loading and hypolimnetic oxygen demand.  Dr. Beutel is the author of numerous reports and journal articles on lake restoration including “A review of the effects of hypolimnetic oxygenation on lake and reservoir water quality” and “Hypolimnetic Anoxia and Sediment Oxygen Demand in California Drinking Water Reservoirs”, both in the Journal of Lake and Reservoir Management.  Dr. Beutel’s current research interests include mercury cycling in lake sediments and control of pesticides in agricultural and urban runoff using natural treatment systems such as constructed wetlands.

Sandra M. Bicego
Dovetail Consulting Inc.
Vancouver B.C. Canada
sandra@dovetailconsulting.com

Indigenous Involvement In The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (D1)

Sandra holds a Bachelor of Laws from the University of Western Australia, and a Masters from the School of Community and Regional Planning, University of British Columbia. An associate of Dovetail Consulting since 1999, Sandra designs and facilitates multi-stakeholder processes and provide strategic facilitation services in organizational development for non-profit organizations, First Nations, agencies, and corporations. Areas of interest include marine and fisheries planning, recreation and tourism policy development, and corporate social responsibility.

Marcie Demmy Bidwell
Research Assistant
University of Washington
410 Gould Box 355740
Seattle, WA 98195-5740
marciedb@u.washington.edu
URL: www.urbaneco.washington.edu

Assessing the Impacts of Urbanization on Shellfish Growing Areas in Puget Sound, Washington (B7)

Marcie Bidwell is a research assistant in the Urban Ecology Research Laboratory and student in the Built Environment Program at the University of Washington. She received her Masters Degree in Landscape Architecture from the University of Washington. Her research explores ecological design and social sciences for landscape and watershed planning.

Philip L. Bloch
Washington DNR
Aquatics Division
Olympia, WA
philip.bloch@wadnr.gov

Beyond Boundaries - Turning Conservation Targets into Conserved Areas (D10)

Philip Bloch provides scientific support for conservation and restoration initiatives of the Aquatics Division of Washington DNR. He studied landscape ecology as a graduate student at Duke University prior to moving to the Pacific Northwest, where he applies ecological and technical skills to restoration and conservation planning efforts.

Thomas D. Bloxton
USDA Forest Service
Pacific Northwest Research Station
Olympia, WA
tbloxton@fs.fed.us

Status and Trend of the Marbled Murrelet in Waters of the Puget Sound (A5)

Tom Bloxton recently completed a Master’s Thesis in the University of Washington’s College of Forest Resources - Wildlife Science Group on the foraging ecology of Northern Goshawks in western Washington. Currently he is the lead biologist on the PNW Research Station’s Marbled Murrelet project involved with monitoring population size and nesting habitat availability, and conducting research into the breeding ecology of this elusive seabird species using radiotelemetry.

John F. Boettner
Washington Dept of Natural Resources
Aquatics Division
Olympia WA
jboe490@wadnr.gov

Using the Internet for Promoting Environmental Stewardship at WDNR (F10)

John Boettner, BS Fisheries Biology UW 1975 1976 - Employed with WDFW, specializing in forage fish biology, hydroacoustic stock assessment of herring, hake, and other pelagic species, pioneered efforts to assess coastal Black Rockfish and habitat, etc. 1992 - WDFW Marine Habitat Biologist in King, Pierce, Clallam, Kitsap, Jefferson, and Snohomish Counties. 1998 - WDNR Environmental Specialist working in all facets of landscape ecology using this background to become a WDNR webmaster.

Lynne Bonner
BC Ministry of Water, Land & Air Protection
Victoria B.C. Canada

The British Columbia Coast and Marine Environment Project (P5)

Lynne Bonner has been working in the BC Ministry of Water, Land & Air Protection’s State of Environment Reporting unit for the past 2 years.  Over the past 16 years with the provincial government in Victoria, BC, she has worked in habitat enhancement, monitoring and inventory programs and was instrumental in developing standards for wildlife habitat ratings applied to terrestrial ecosystem mapping.  Currently, Lynne is working on the BC Coast & Marine Environment project, focusing on measures of coastal ecosystem health and investigating ways of incorporating Traditional Ecological Knowledge into environmental reporting.

Amy B. Borde
Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory
Coastal Assessment and Restoration
Sequim, WA
amy.borde@pnl.gov

A Conceptual Model Tool for Coastal Management (D4)

Ms. Amy Borde specializes in wetland ecology and restoration. Recent research has included assessment of eelgrass meadows in Puget Sound and Northwest coastal estuaries; the development of innovative methods for propagating and transplanting seagrass; the assessment of areas proposed for mitigation; and use of adaptive management principles in monitoring programs.  She uses GIS for identifying the aerial extent of eelgrass meadows and wetlands, comparing historical habitats with existing conditions, and locating specific areas for restoration.

Julia K. Bos
Washington State Department of Ecology
Coastal & Estuarine Assessment Unit
Olympia, WA
jbos461@ecy.wa.gov

Interannual variation in water quality variables in Puget Sound as revealed by time-series analysis (E7)

The Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership: A Forum for Regional Coordination (P5)

I am an oceanographer employed by the Washington State Dept. of Ecology, working in the Marine Waters Monitoring Group. Currently my work focuses on long-term monitoring of Puget Sound and Washington coastal waters, and applying new technologies to this effort, as well as developing methodologies for treatment of historical data. I received my B.S. in Chemical Oceanography from the University of Washington.

John L. Bower
Western Washington University
Fairhaven College
Bellingham, WA
jbower@cc.wwu.edu

Marine Bird Abundance Changes In N. W. Washington Inshore Waters (A5)

John teaches field biology, natural history, evolution, environmental issues, and folk music performance at Fairhaven College, an inter-disciplinary college within Western, Washington University. His current research involves repeating important components of the 1970’s MESA census to document recent marine bird population changes in inshore marine Waters, censusing wintering bald eagle populations along the Nooksack River, categorizing marbled murrelet vocalizations, and studying acoustic interactions in songbirds.

Sean W. Boyd
Pacific Wildlife Research Centre
Canadian Wildlife Service
Delta B.C. Canada
sean.boyd@ec.gc.ca

Wrangel Island (Russia) Snow Geese wintering on the Fraser and Skagit River deltas: population dynamics and interaction with Scirpus marshes. (A6)

Dr. Boyd received his PhD from Simon Fraser Univ. in 1995. His thesis was on the ecology of the Snow Goose population wintering on the Fraser and Skagit River deltas. Dr. Boyd works on a variety of different birds species, including Snow and Brant Geese, Trumpeter Swans, scoters, Harlequin Ducks and Barrow’s Goldeneye.

Jill M. Brandenberger
Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Marine Research Operations
Sequim, WA
Jill.Brandenberger@pnl.gov

The ENVVEST Approach for Stormwater Pollutant Loading in the Sinclair- Dyes Inlet Watershed (B2)

Ms. Jill Brandenberger has a strong background in water quality issues and metals chemistry. She has lead or participated in programs targeting water quality on a watershed scale including: Nueces River basin, Sinclair/Dyes Inlet, and Clallam County. Ms. Brandenberger evaluated the degradation of reservoir water quality as a function of temporal and event-driven cycling of trace metals. Current project and program management experience includes development of TMDLs, historical reconstruction of contaminant loading, and chemical evaluation of dredged material.

Sara J. Breslow
University of Washington
Environmental Anthropology
Mount Vernon WA
sarajo@u.washington.edu

Science-Based Salmon Habitat Restoration and Social Conflict in the Pacific Northwest: a Case Study of the Skagit Valley (P6)

Sara Breslow is currently a doctoral candidate in the Environmental Anthropology program at the University of Washington.  She holds a bachelors degree in Biology from Swarthmore College.  She welcomes ideas for how to be both an academic and an artist.

Ginny Broadhurst
Marine Program Coordinator
Northwest Straits Commission
10441 Bayview Edison Rd.
Mount Vernon, WA  98273
broadhurst@nwstraits.org
Tel: 360-428-1064
Fax: 360-428-1491
URL: www.nwstraits.org

Creosote removal in the Northwest Straits: an important piece of nearshore marine habitat restoration (A7)

Improving existing marine protected areas in Puget Sound (D10)

Ginny Broadhurst is the Marine Program Coordinator for the Northwest Straits Commission.  She manages regional marine conservation and restoration projects and provides technical support to 7 Marine Resources Committees and the Commission.  Ginny received a B.S. from University of New Hampshire and an M.M.A. from University of Washington. Ginny spent 12 years at the Puget Sound Action Team working on wetland protection, land use issues and marine protected area policies prior to coming to the Commission in 2003.  She is co-chair of the Marine Protected Area Science Work Group.

Nicholas A. Brown
Summer Research Assistant
The SeaDoc Society
UC Davis Wildlife Health Center – Orcas Island Office
1016 Deer Harbor Road
Eastsound, Washington 98245
Tel: (360) 376-3910
Fax: (360) 376-3909
URL: www.seadocsociety.org

Species of Concern within the Puget Sound Georgia Basin Marine Ecosystem: changes from 2002 to 2004 (C7)

Nicholas Brown a student summer research assistant with the SeaDoc Society, a marine ecosystem health program of the UC Davis Wildlife Health Center.  He recently completed his AA degree at Skagit Valley College and plans to matriculate at Western Washington University.  He enjoys SCUBA diving and sea kayaking.

Ian D. Bruce
Tseycum First Nation
Sidney  B.C. Canada
brucei@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Tseycum First Nation and the Restoration of the Patricia Bay Watershed (F8)

Ian Douglas Bruce is a Registered Professional Biologist with 25 years experience working with First Nations and community groups on fisheries, salmon enhancement and habitat projects. Ian recently completed a Diploma in ‘Restoration of Natural Systems’ from the University of Victoria. Ian works part-time for Tseycum First Nation and is Executive Director of Peninsula Streams Society, and umbrella organization supporting seven stream- and three marine conservation/restoration groups on the Saanich Peninsula.

Julia Brydon
Research Assistant
Inst. for Resources, Environment and Sustain.
University of British Columbia
487-2206 East Mall
University of British Columbia
Vancouver B.C. Canada V6T 1Z3
jbrydon@interchange.ubc.ca
Tel: (604) 822-9245
Fax: (604) 822-9250

Trace Metal Retention in Urban Stormwater Ponds in the Lower Fraser Valley, B.C. (B2)

The research Julia Brydon is presenting is from her M.Sc. thesis in Resource Management and Environmental Studies, which she completed at the University of British Columbia in the fall of 2004.  Her research interests include the effects of urbanization on water quality and the effectiveness of BMPs and low impact design on mitigating some of these impacts.  She is currently working as a research assistant at the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability at UBC.

Dan Buffett
Ducks Unlimited Canada
Surrey B.C. Canada
d_buffett@ducks.ca

Spatial and temporal use of estuary and upland habitats by wintering waterfowl on the Fraser River delta and north Puget Sound. (A6)

Waterfowl distribution at multiple scales in the Georgia Basin Puget Sound. (A6)

A partnership approach to Spartina removal in the Fraser River Delta (C9)

Dan Buffett is the senior biologist for the BC Coastal Office of Ducks Unlimited Canada and is part of a multi-agency team that plans and implements securement and restoration of estuaries along the BC Coast. He is currently completing a masters degree in Resource and Environment Management at Simon Fraser University.

Eric R. Buhle
University of Washington
Biology
Seattle, WA
buhle@u.washington.edu

Impacts of invasive drills on Olympia oysters in Puget Sound: patterns and mechanisms (C9)

Born and raised in Massachusetts, Eric Buhle is a naturalized Northwesterner. He received a B.A. in Biology from Reed College and worked on the science of salmon recovery at NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center before entering the Ph.D. program at the University of Washington. His dissertation research focuses on using ecological theory to understand the impacts of introduced species in Pacific Northwest estuaries.

Douglas Bulthuis
Estuarine Scientist
Padilla Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve
Washington Department of Ecology
10441 Bay View-Edison Road
Mount Vernon, WA  98273-9668
bulthuis@padillabay.gov
Tel: 360-428-1089
Fax: 360-428-1491

Nutrients in an Eelgrass Dominated Bay:  Seasonal and Diurnal Fluctuations in Dissolved Inorganic Nitrogen and Phosphorus (B10)

Douglas Bulthuis is the Research Coordinator at Padilla Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve near Mount Vernon, Washington.  He received a B.A. from Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan, an M.Sc. from Michigan State University in Lansing, Michigan, and a Ph.D. from LaTrobe University in Melbourne, Australia.  He has conducted research on seagrasses in Victoria, Australia and in Washington State.

Brenda Burd
President, Ecostat Research Ltd
Research Associate, University of British Columbia
1040 Clayton Rd. N. Saanich, BC, Canada V8L 5P6
burdb@pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca
Tel: 250-363-6345
Fax: 250-655-1669

Ecological significance of sediment biotic and geochemical effects related to the Iona WWTP outfall discharge to the Strait of Georgia off Sturgeon Bank (B2)

The work of Dr. Brenda Burd includes; 1) development of sampling designs for aquatic habitats and analysis of benthic community response and recovery patterns as they relate to the environment. Numerous projects cover temperate and tropical marine habitats from 1980 to present, including untouched areas as well those exposed to discharges by metal mines, pulp mills, fish farms, sewage, stormwater, industrial and ocean dumping; 2) development of sampling and analytical protocols and theory for benthic research and monitoring programs, such as Environment Canada's Environmental Effects Monitoring program (EEM) for Pulp and Paper and metal mines.

C

Joan Cabreza
EPA Region 10
1200 Sixth Ave
Seattle, WA
cabreza.joan@epa.gov

Invasion Pathway Analysis and Genetic Screening Tool Development (C9)

Environmental Scientist for EPA Region 10 (covering WA, OR, ID, AK) since 1985. She is currently the EPA Region 10 Invasive Species Coordinator and co-chair of the, Washington State ANS Committee. She is also responsible for WA Wetland Mitigation Banking. Previous experience includes work in environmental consulting, academia, and state agencies, as well as 16 years teaching and entomological and fisheries research in Costa Rica, Thailand, the Philippines, and Guam.

John Cambalik
Local Liaison—Clallam, Jefferson and Kitsap counties
Puget Sound Action Team
PO Box 40900
Olympia, WA  98504-0900
Tel: 360-582-9132
Fax: 360-582-9132
jcambalik@psat.wa.gov

Educating Shoreline Landowners: Examples from King, Whatcom, Kitsap, Jefferson, Mason and Pierce Counties: A Perspective on Approaches and Effectiveness in eliciting on-the-ground change. (F9)

John holds a B.S. in Fisheries Biology from the State University of New York, Syracuse and an M.S. in Marine Science from North Carolina State University.

John Calambokidis
Cascadia Research
Olympia, WA
calambokidis@cascadiaresearch.org

Gray whales in Puget Sound and surrounding waters: not just migrants (A2)

Harbor seals as indicators of trends in contaminants in Puget Sound: comparison of results from two sites (D8)

John Calambokidis is a Research Biologist and one of the founders of Cascadia Research, a non-profit research organization formed in 1979. He has authored two books on marine mammals as well as more than 50 reports and publications on the biology and human impacts on this diverse group. He has conducted studies on a variety of marine mammals in the North Pacific and has conducted long-term research on blue, humpback, and gray whales.

Clive Callaway
The Living by Water Project
Salmon Arm B.C. Canada
clivec@jetstream.net

Shoreline Stewardship Support for Local Government (C3)

Clive Callaway, M.E. Des. is a co-founder of The Living by Water Project (www.livingbywater.ca). He is co-author of On the Living Edge — Your Handbook for Waterfront Living and has been involved with the Living by Water Project for over seven years. Clive has assisted local government and has given many workshops and presentations across Canada and in the U.S. for elected officials, planners, and a variety of land professionals. He is co-recipient of several major awards, including the 2002 gold medal, clean Water category, in Canada’s National Environment awards.

Maria Calvi
Duke University - Durham NC
Nicholas School of the Environment & Earth Science
Seattle, WA
maria.calvi@duke.edu

A framework for conservation and restoration management of nearshore ecosystems in Puget Sound (F6)

In December 2004, Maria Calvi graduated from the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences at Duke University as a Master of Environmental Management with a focus on landscape and geospatial analysis and public participation in conservation. While a student, she interned with The Nature Conservancy of Washington, People for Puget Sound, Puget Sound Nearshore Ecosystem Restoration Project, and Cascade Land Conservancy on projects ranging from ecological assessments to public outreach.

Elisa Campbell
Sustainable Communities Program
Vancouver BC Canada

Case by case - the design and implementation of sustainable communities (B8)

Elisa Campbell has a background in green buildings, infrastructure, and the communities that knit them together, and has focused on enhancing the performance of our urban environments at the building and community scales. Elisa was appointed Director of the Sustainable Communities Program at UBC in early 2003. This new program is focused on being a leader in applying sustainability concepts to real-world situations, drawing on sustainability research from UBC, and working towards implementation.

Glenn A. Cannon
University of Washington
School of Oceanography
Seattle, WA
cannon@ocean.washington.edu

Circulation Characteristics of Puget Sound Related to Understanding Hood Canal (D5)

Glenn Cannon is an Affiliate Professor of Oceanography at University of Washington. He is retired from NOAA where he made numerous studies of Puget Sound circulation. He recently worked with Evans-Hamilton Inc. to help King County determine a good outfall location in Puget Sound for a new sewer treatment plant

Tom Carlson
University of Washington
GIS Program - Urban Studies
Tacoma WA
carlsont@u.washington.edu

Landscape Fragmentation and Urban Sprawl in Pierce County, WA (B7)

Tom is a Biogeographer with an interest in using Geographic Information Technologies: GIS, remote sensing, and GPS to model landscape change at multiple scales. Specific research interests include using GIS and remote sensing for change detection in Puget Sound salt marshes and surrounding lowlands, landscape change in tropical ecosystems, and modeling urban space. He teaches Geography and GIS and serves as the GIS Coordinator at the University of Washington, Tacoma campus.

Todd A. Carnahan
Habitat Acquisition Trust
Victoria B.C. Canada
todd@hat.bc.ca

Mill Hill Landowner Outreach Stewardship Project (P6)

Todd joined HAT in 2004 to deliver our Good Neighbours landowner contact projects.  Now our Stewardship Cordinator, Todd also manages the Matson Lands, our last remaining Garry Oak meadow (Quercus garryana) in Victoria Harbour. Formerly an ecological planner with the Royal Botanical Gardens, Todd has assisted community stewardship and restoration projects in Southern Ontario and Greater Victoria, British Columbia.

José Carrasquero
Herrera Environmental Consultants
2200 Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100
Seattle, WA 98121
jcarrasquero@herrerainc.com
Tel: 206-441-9080
Fax: 206-441-9108
URL: http://www.herrerainc.com/

Bulkheading in Thurston County: Impacts on Forage Fish Spawning Habitat (A7)

José Carrasquero is Fisheries Director at Herrera Environmental Consultants.  He has graduate degrees in both fisheries and marine biology and 16 years of professional experience in the study of shore-drift direction and longshore sediment transport, beach sediment and profile characterization, benthic ecology, salmon biology and estuarine habitat requirements, food web dynamics, and ecology of estuarine systems.  Mr. Carrasquero has participated in salt marsh restoration feasibility studies including the physical and biological evaluation and selection of reference marshes in Puget Sound.  He has also participated in the design of estuarine fish passage structures associated with roads adjacent to salt marshes.   In addition, Mr. Carrasquero has conducted intertidal and estuarine habitat assessments and biological assessments in Puget Sound, including eelgrass and kelp bed studies.

Lilly S. Cesh
Simon Fraser University
Biological Sciences
Port Moody B.C. Canada
lscesh@sfu.ca

Effect of PCBs and PBDEs on thyroid and vitamin A levels in bald eagles (B6)

Effect of plasma lipid content on interpreting chlorinated hydrocarbon concentration in bald eagles (P2)

I am a student at Simon Fraser University working towards my masters in environmental toxicology.

Corrina Chase
Master's Candidate
School of Marine Affairs
University of Washington
4514 Thackeray Pl. NE

Seattle, WA 98105
corrina@alum.mit.edu
Tel: (206)634-4243

Marine Protected Area Networks and Rockfish in the Salish Sea: Research Directions (D9)

Corrina graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2002 with a bachelor’s degree in Earth, Atmosphere, and Planetary Sciences.  After working for the Department of Environmental Protection as an organic chemistry technician and the Ipswich Watershed Council as a GIS consultant, she enrolled in the University of Washington’s School of Marine Affairs where she is now a master’s candidate. 

Sangho Choi
The University of Arizona
Soil Water and Environmental Science
Tucson Arizona
schoi@email.arizona.edu

The Management of Giant Salvinia by Biological Control On thelower Colorado River (P2)

Ph.D. student in soil water and environmental scicence dept. at U of A, since 2001.  I’ve been involved in giant salvinia control project since early 2002.

Dave Christensen
Water Quality Program Manager
Hood Canal Coordinating Council
211 Taylor Street, Suite 5
Port Townsend WA 98368
Email: dave.christensen@earthlink.net
Tel: (360) 379-2269
Fax: (360) 379-2269
URL: http://www.wa.gov/hccc

Developing Early Corrective Actions to Address Hypoxia in Hood Canal (D6)

Dave Christensen is water quality program manager for the Hood Canal Coordinating Council.  Previously, he held several positions in his 8 years working for Jefferson County, including Natural Resources Division Manager and Environmental Health Director.  Dave has a MS in Limnology and Oceanography from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, and a BS in Fisheries from the University of Washington. 

Aimee Christy
Senior Biologist
Pacific Shellfish Institute
509 12th Ave SE
Olympia, WA 98501
aimee@pacshell.org
Tel: 360-754-2741
URL: www.pacshell.org

Literature Review and Analysis of Coastal Urbanization and Microbial Contamination of Shellfish Growing Areas (P2)

Detection of the harmful algal species Pseudo-nitzschia and associated particulate and dissolved domoic acid with concurrent water column quality and nutrient concentrations obtained from a moored automated water sampler (P2)

Aimee Christy has worked as senior biologist for Pacific Shellfish Institute since 2002 on plankton sampling, site monitoring, and data analysis. Aimee has eight years of experience in water quality analysis, wetland and estuarine studies, and invertebrate/algae surveys. Her interests include stormwater management and researching the impacts of land use change on water quality, particularly in shellfish growing areas. She received a B.S. in Zoology from the University of Washington and is currently completing her Masters in Environmental Studies at The Evergreen State College.

Bruce Claiborne
Science Advisor, Divemaster
Bainbridge High School
Bainbridge Island, WA 98110
BCLAIBORNE@bainbridge.wednet.edu
Tel: (206) 780-1282

Return of the Plankton: The Seasons Underwater in Puget Sound

Bruce Claiborne, science teacher 1970 to present; marine research scientist for GeoMarine, Inc., Washington State Teaching Certificate (BS WSU, Pullman), (WSSTC/UW, Seattle)

Tansy Clay
University of Washington
Oceanography
Seattle, WA
tansy@ocean.washington.edu

Effects of turbulent flow on the movement of larval sand dollars (A8)

I received a Masters degree from San Francisco State University where I studied the effects of thin layers of prey on the vertical distribution of larval herring. I am presently enrolled in the PhD program in biological oceanography at the University of Washington. My current research addresses how the movement of invertebrate larvae is affected by environmental factors, with particular emphasis on organism-flow interactions. I am also actively involved in scientific outreach and education.

Carol Cloen
Washington State Department of Natural Resources
Aquatic Resources Program
Olympia, WA
carol.cloen@wadnr.gov

Habitat Based Science as a Management Tool for Washington's State-owned Aquatic Lands (F10)

Carol Cloen is the Lead Scientist for Washington DNR’s Aquatic Resources Program’s Endangered Species Act compliance project. She is a freshwater ecologist, with research and practical experience in trophic interactions in the Great Lakes, UV-B’s affect on amphibians, and riparian restoration. Carol received her BS and MS from the State University of New York College at Brockport, conducting original research on the effect of UV-B on the hatching success of the American toad (Bufo americanus).

Audrey M. Colnar
Western Washington University
Environmental Science
Bellingham, WA
colnara@cc.wwu.edu

Regional risk assessment of the European green crab, Carcinus maenas, in Cherry Point, Washington (P2)

I will have a Master of Science in Environmental Science from Western, Washington University in December 2004. My main research interests include ecological risk assessment and the application of risk assessment methodology to the issue of non-indigenous species.

Colm D. Condon
Simon Fraser University
Resource and Environmental Management
B.C. Canada
cdcondon@sfu.ca

A marine food-web bioaccumulation model for PCBs and PBDEs in the Georgia Basin (P4)

I have a background in cell biology and am currently completing a master’s in resource and environmental management (REM) at Simon Fraser University.   

Andrea E. Copping
Associate Director
Washington Sea Grant Program
University of Washington
3716 Brooklyn Ave NE
Seattle, WA 98105
acopping@u.washington.edu
Tel: 206/685-8209
Fax: 206/685-0380
URL: wsg.washington.edu

British Columbia/Washington Marine Science Panel: Ten Years Later (C6)

Andrea Copping is a biological oceanographer who came in from the deep blue sea to work on coastal and estuarine issues in the Pacific Northwest.  Andrea is Associate Director of the, Washington Sea Grant Program, serves on the Northwest Straits Commission, and long ago chaired the British Columbia/Washington Marine Science Panel. She is particularly interested in how science is used to manage and protect our marine resources.

Bruce F. Cousens
Senior Biologist
Georgia Basin Ecol. Assessment & Restoration Soc.
#133-4176 A Departure Bay Rd
Nanaimo, BC V9T 4V7 Canada
pmartins@island.net
Tel: 250-758-2922   
Fax: 250-758-2922
URL: www.georgiabasin.ca

Recovery of the Western Purple Martin bordering the "Salish Sea" -  the Georgia Basin of British Columbia and Puget Sound, Washington (E9)

Bruce Cousens obtained a B.Sc. in zoology and marine biology and a M.Sc. in fisheries biology and parasitology, followed by nearly 30 years experience in research, environmental consulting and habitat assessment in BC. More recently, he has been heavily involved in habitat restoration and conservation of species at risk through a non-profit society. He is a member of the Assoc. of Professional Biologists of BC and the BC College of Applied Biology.

Tom Cowan
Director
Northwest Straits Commission
10441 Bayview Edison Road
Mount Vernon, WA 98273
cowan@nwstraits.org
Tel: 360-428-1085
Fax: 360-428-1491
URL: www.nwstraits.org

Impacts of Human Activities: Derelict Fishing Gear in Puget Sound (F2)

Pat Crain
Olympic National Park
600 E. Park Avenue
Port Angeles, Washington 98362
patrick_crain@nps.gov
Tel: 360.565.3075

Elwha and Glines Canyon dam removals: nearshore restoration and salmon recovery of the central Strait of Juan de Fuca (C4)

Pat Crain has been involved in planning efforts to restore the Elwha River ecosystem since 1989, when he joined the staff for the Point No Point Treaty Council and Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe as a fisheries biologist/fisheries manager.  He contributed to the drafting of the Elwha Report (DOI, 1994), as well as the subsequent Environmental Impact Statements evaluating options for restoring the Elwha Watershed through dam removal (DOI, 1995 and 1996).  Pat holds a MS degree in Fisheries from the University of Washington. He is currently employed as a fisheries biologist for Olympic National Park.

Hilary Culverwell
Local Liaison—Skagit, Whatcom and San Juan counties
Puget Sound Action Team
PO Box 4101
Bellingham, WA  98226
hculverwell@psat.wa.gov
Tel: 360-676-2233
Fax: 360-676-2233

Educating Shoreline Landowners: Examples from King, Whatcom, Kitsap, Jefferson, Mason and Pierce Counties: A Perspective on Approaches and Effectiveness in eliciting on-the-ground change. (F9)

Hilary earned her B.A. in Political Science from Occidental College, and a Master of Public Affairs (M.P.A.) and an M.S. in Environmental Science from Indiana University.

Patrick F. Cummins
Institute of Ocean Sciences
Sidney B.C. Canada
cumminsp@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Co-variability of the Strait of Georgia and the northeast Pacific Ocean on climatic time scales (E2)

Patrick Cummins completed his PhD. from the University of British Columbia in 1989, under the supervision of Professor Lawrence Mysak. He has been working as a research scientist at the Institute of Ocean Sciences since the early 1990s. Dr. Cummins’ work includes studies of the northeast Pacific ocean and the coastal waters of British Columbia.

Kathryn Cunningham
University of Washington
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences
Seattle, WA
kathryn2@u.washington.edu

Genetic Stock Structure of Pacific Cod (Gadus macrocephalus) (P1)

Kathryn Cunningham is a graduate student in the Marine Molecular Biotechnology Lab in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington, working with Lorenz Hauser. Her primary research interests relate to population genetics and conservation. Currently she is working on genetic stock structure in Pacific cod. Kathryn recieved a B.A. in Biology from Occidental College in 1999.

D

Neil Dangerfield
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Marine Environmental Quality
Sidney B.C. Canada
dangerfieldn@pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca

The pollution shadow: characterizing “local” and “global” air pollution in the Strait of Georgia (P4)

Neil Dangerfield is a Research Technician with the Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans. He works on a variety of laboratory- and field- based projects to examine the source, transport and fate of environmental contaminants in Pacific coastal waters and in marine mammal food chains. He obtained his BSc in Chemistry from the University of Victoria.

Kate Davies
Core Faculty, Environment & Community
Center for Creative Change
Antioch University Seattle
2326 Sixth Avenue
Seattle, WA 98121
kdavies@antiochsea.edu
Tel: 206 268 4811
Fax: 206 441 3307

Environmental Public Health in Washington State: How Complete are the Data? (A9)

Kate Davies has a doctorate in biochemistry and an MA in Human and Organizational Transformation. She is currently Core Faculty in Environment & Community at Antioch University Seattle. In 2004, she was a member of the WA Department of Ecology's Rule-Making Committee on Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxins and in November she received the Rotary Club of Seattle’s Award for ‘Service Above Self’. In the 1980s, she was Manager of Toronto's Environmental Protection Office and Canadian Chair of the International Joint Commission's Health Committee. In the 1990s, she was Principal of Ecosystems Consulting, a successful environmental health policy Company. 

Jay W. Davis
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Environmental Contaminants
Lacey, WA
jay_davis@fws.gov

Neurobehavioral Effects of the Carbamate Insecticide, Carbaryl, on Salmonids (A10)

Jay Davis has an undergraduate degree in marine biology and graduated from Texas A&M University with an MS in environmental toxicology. After managing an aquatic toxicology laboratory for 3+ years he was dragged off to the Peace Corps by his wife and served in Ecuador for 2+ years. He currently works as a resource contaminants specialist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Western Washington Office in Lacey, Washington.

Tim Determan
Coordinator, Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program
Food Safety and Shellfish Programs
Washington State Department of Health
P.O. Box 47824
Olympia, WA 98504-7824
tim.determan@doh.wa.gov
Tel: (360) 236-3311
Fax: (360) 236-3357

Evaluating Status and Trends in Fecal Pollution in Puget Sound through 2004 (P2)

Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) in Puget Sound (P3)

Tim Determan holds a BS in biological oceanography from the University of Washington and did graduate work at the University of Guam.  His professional interests have centered on Water quality monitoring and associated focused studies, especially related to non-point pollution.  He has been a technical advisor to local and state agencies regarding the affect of pollution on shellfish resources.  He now assesses status and trends in biotoxins and fecal pollution for the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program (PSAMP) at the Washington State Department of Health.

Megan N. Dethier
University of Washington
Friday Harbor Labs and Dept. of Biology
Friday Harbor WA
mdethier@u.washington.edu

Linking nearshore processes with intertidal diversity in Puget Sound (F9)

I did my undergraduate work at Carleton College in Minnesota, despite the apparent lack of ocean there, then PhD work at the University of Washington, near a real ocean. My current research efforts include: 1) Investigating the linkage between physical features of shoreline habitats and their biota; 2) studying the plant/herbivore ecology and ecophysiology of intertidal seaweeds; and 3) investigating interactions between native salt marsh communities and an invasive cordgrass in Puget Sound.

Bronwyn Dexter
Habitat Restoration Program Assistant
People For Puget Sound
911 Western Ave. Suite 580
Seattle, WA 98104
bdexter@pugetsound.org
Tel: (206) 382-7007
Fax: (206) 382-7006
URL: www.pugetsound.org

Sound Stewards: The Art of Nurturing Our Super-Volunteers (E8)

Bronwyn Dexter, Habitat Restoration Program Assistant, began working with People For Puget Sound as an intern in November 2003. She helps coordinate the habitat restoration activities and the Sound Stewardship program in the Central and South Sound regions.  A Seattle native and long-time outdoor fanatic, she holds a BA in Ecological Studies from Seattle University.

Jeff Dillon
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Fisheries biologist
Attn:  CE-EN-PL-ER
PO Box 3755
Seattle, WA  98124-2255
jeffrey.f.dillon@usace.army.mil
Tel: (206) 764-6174
Fax: (206) 764-6676

Seahurst Park: Restoring Nearshore Habitat and Reconnecting Natural Sediment Supply Processes (F7)

Jeff Dillon is a biologist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Jeff has worked for the Corps' Seattle District for over 11 years where he has served as lead coordinator for a variety of federal projects in Washington, Idaho and Montana.  Jeff has experience planning, designing and permitting restoration projects in both freshwater and marine environments. Jeff is currently involved in the Corps' Puget Sound Nearshore Restoration Project and other large planning studies in Western Washington.

Paul A. Dinnel
Western Washington University
Shannon Point Marine Center
Anacortes, WA
padinnel@aol.com

Olympia Oyster Restoration in Fidalgo Bay, Washington (P3)

Paul Dinnel received his BA and MA in Biology from Humboldt State University, Northern California and his PhD from UW, where he worked as a Research Scientist for 18 years. Paul has over 25 years experience in the Puget Sound region as a marine toxicologist and ecologist and is now a Marine Scientist with WWU. Paul is a volunteer with the Padilla Bay Foundation, Skagit County Marine Resources Committee and past chair of the Northwest Straits Commission.

Jamie Donatuto
Environmental Specialist
Swinomish Indian Tribal Community
Office of Planning and Community Development
PO Box 817
La Conner, WA  98257
jdonatuto@swinomish.nsn.us
Tel: (360) 466-1532
Fax: (360) 466-1615

Rounding the Home Stretch: Learning Experiences from the Bioaccumulative Toxics in Native American Shellfish Project (D1)

Jamie Donatuto is an Environmental Specialist for the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, located in La Conner, Washington.  She has worked for the Tribe since June 2000 doing project design and implementation in the Water Resources Program.  She is the Project Manager of the Bioaccumulative Toxics in Native American Shellfish project.  In addition, Ms. Donatuto is a PhD student in the Resource Management and Environmental Studies Program at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, BC.  Her research concentration focuses on creating a comprehensive risk assessment for the Swinomish Tribe. 

Cinde Donoghue
WA Dept of Ecology
SEA Program

,

Olympia, WA
cdon461@ecy.wa.gov

A Puget Sound Coastal Landform Classification GIS database (D4)

Over 15 years of experience with international, federal, state local agencies working on issues regarding landuse, dredging and disposal impacts to marine shoreline ecology. Currently coastal ecosystems scientist with WA Dept of Ecology Research focus on landuse, Ph.D. Environmental Sciences; Coastal Processes, University of Virginia Masters in Urban and Environmenal Planning, University of Virginia Masters in Environmenal Sciences; University of Virgina.

Paul R. Dorn
Suquamish Tribe
Fisheries Department
Suquamish, WA
pdorn@suquamish.nsn.us

Integration of Joint City of Bainbridge Island/Suquamish Tribal Beach Seining Results into Shoreline Management and Salmon Recovery Efforts in Kitsap County, Washington (B9)

Paul Dorn has a BS in Fisheries Biology from the University of Washington and has worked for the past 29 years as a tribal biologist for the Suquamish Tribe working on salmon recovery.

James D. Dougherty
Gray & Osborne Consulting Engineers
Stormwater
Seattle, WA
jdougherty@g-o.com

North Bay Case Inlet Water Reuse Facility (F2)

Jim Dougherty holds a B.S. Degree in Environmental Studies with a concentration in Marine Resources from Huxley College of Environmental Studies, Western, Washington University. He is currently responsible for environmental permitting for water, wastewater and infrastructure projects throughout Washington. Prior to joining Gray & Osborne, Inc., Mr. Dougherty worked as a Hazard Mitigation Specialist for the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and as a fisheries biologist and environmental specialist for consulting firms in Washington and California.

Pete Dowty
Washington Department of Natural Resources
Aquatic Resources Division
Olympia, WA
peter.dowty@wadnr.gov

Ability to Predict Zostera marina Cover Based on Geomorphic and Hydrologic Variables in Puget Sound, Washington (P4)

Pete Dowty is currently focusing on eelgrass monitoring and ecology with the Washington State Department of Natural Resources. His previous experience includes positions with the Puget Sound Action Team and the Skokomish Department of Natural Resources. His post-doctoral work focused on modeling of terrestrial primary production, fuel loading and biomass burning emissions. His education includes the remote sensing of fires (M.S.) and biophysical modeling in southern African savannas (PhD), both at the University of Virginia.

Jeffrey J. Duda
US Geological Survey
Western Fisheries Research Center
Seattle, WA
jeff_duda@usgs.gov

Pre-dam removal monitoring in the Elwha River Basin: establishing baseline levels of stable isotopes in fish and benthic communities (A1)

Investigations of the ecological, fluvial, and nearshore impacts of the Elwha River dam removal (P4)

Jeffrey Duda is a research ecologist with the US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center in Seattle,WA.

Cynthia Durance
Principal, Precision Identification
3622 West 3rd Avenue
Vancouver, B.C., Canada V6R 1L9
precid@shaw.ca
Tel: 604 734-5048
URL: www.shim.bc.ca/atlases/atlas.html

Restoring Marine Habitats and Mending Social Communities (F10)

Cynthia Durance has studied eelgrass ecology & restoration in British Columbia for 25 years. She has worked for SeaChange Marine Conservation Society for seven years as a scientific advisor. Since that time she has developed manuals and interactive web mapping for stewardship groups. She has taught eelgrass ecology and trained over 20 community groups in BC to map and monitor eelgrass.  The next step is teaching them to restore eelgrass habitat.

Margaret E. Dutch
Washington State Department of Ecology
Environmental Assessment Program
Olympia, WA
mdut461@ecy.wa.gov

Relationships between benthic infaunal community structure and dissolved oxygen levels in bottom Waters of Hood Canal (D5)

Concentrations of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDE) in Hood Canal (P2)

Margaret Dutch is a senior benthic ecologist for the Washington State Department of Ecology’s Coastal and Estuarine Assessment Unit, working as a member of the unit’s Marine Sediment Monitoring Team (MSMT) since 1992 conducting the Sediment Component of the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program (PSAMP). Ms Dutch received her Master of Science degree at the University of Hawaii, and worked previously on marine sediment monitoring programs in New England, Hawaii and San Francisco.


E

Ann Eissinger
Nahkeeta Northwest Wildlife Services
Bow, WA
nahkeeta@fidalgo.net

Effective Volunteer-Based monitoring for European Green Crab in Puget Sound. (C5)

Movement and Spatial Requirements of Great Blue Heron Colonies Over Time (E9)

Great Blue Herons of the Salish Sea: Status and Conservation. (P1)

Professional Wildlife Biologist Ann Eissinger owns Nahkeeta Northwest Wildlife Services in Bow, Washington. Over twenty years, Ann has worked as researcher, consultant, educator and conservationist, facilitating key habitat protection for great blue heron, marbled murrelet and Vaux’s swift. She is currently researching great blue heron habitat relationships and populations throughout the Salish Sea. Ms Eissinger is also Coordinator for the European Green Crab Monitoring Program and Director of the Wildlife Conservation Trust’s, Chuckanut Biodiversity Project.

William H. Eldridge
University of Washington
School of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Seattle, WA
whe@u.washington.edu

Decadal changes in genetic diversity of Puget Sound coho salmon (C2)

Received a MS from the University of Minnesota in 2000, then worked at the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission in Olympia,Washington on hatchery reform for three years. Currently a PhD student at the University of Washington.

Joel Elliott
Associate Professor
Department of Biology
University of Puget Sound
1500 N. Warner
Tacoma,, WA 98416
jkelliott@ups.edu
Tel: (253) 879-8593

Factors influencing the distribution and abundance of Zostera marina in Commencement Bay, WA (P2)

Will the introduced mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis outcompete the native mussel M. trossulus in Puget Sound? A study of relative frequencies, growth and survival among different habitats (P2)

Joel K. Elliott is an Associate Professor in the Biology department at the University of Puget Sound.  His research interests include studies of local environmental issues in Puget Sound. One of the projects he is involved in is the effects of the introduced mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis on local marine communities.  He is also using underwater videography, GPS and GIS technologies to study subtidal habitats.  Current studies are on the distribution and abundance of eelgrass beds and the bacterium Beggiatoa in Commencement Bay.

John Elliott
Environment Canada
Canadian Wildlife Service
RR#1 Delta B.C. Canada
john.elliott@ec.gc.ca

Poisoning of birds of prey by anticholinesterase insecticides in agricultural areas of southwestern British Columbia (A9)

An Assessment of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Effects on Development of Wild Mink (Mustela vison) from Ontario and British Columbia, Canada (A10)

Trends in polybrominated diphenyl ethers iin eggs of aquatic and marine birds from British Columbia, Canada, 1979-2002 (P2)

John Elliott is a Research Scientist at the Canadian Wildlife Service, Pacific and Yukon Region of Environment Canada where he has worked for 15 years.  He has a PhD from the University of British Columbia, and BSc and  MSc from Ottawa universities, where he worked for CWS for 8 years.  As an ecotoxicologist, he has focused on persistent contaminant effects on populations of top predators, such as bald eagles, ospreys, and seabirds. 

Robert J. Elner
Canadian Wildlife Service
Biology
B.C. Canada
bob.elner@ec.gc.ca

Shorebird feeding ecology: implications for conservation and management (E9)

Robert Elner is Head of the Migratory Birds Conservation Section with Environment Canada’s Canadian Wildlife Service at the Pacific Wildlife Research Centre in Delta, British Columbia. He was a Research Scientist with Fisheries and Oceans Canada, working with marine invertebrates on both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts for over 10 years. In 1991, he switched fields to migratory bird conservation because he believed that avian systems were scientifically more tractable. His soon learned his mistake but has continued researching the feeding ecology, functional morphology and natural diet of calidrid sandpipers. Dr. Elner is an Adjunct Professor at Simon Fraser University and serves on committees of graduate students affiliated with the Centre for Wildlife Ecology, Simon Fraser University, and Centre for Conservation Biology, University of British Columbia. 


Gerald M. Erickson
Marine Scientist
Polaris Applied Sciences, Inc.
12525 131st Court N.E.
Kirkland,Washington 98034-7713
jerickson@polarisappliedsciences.com
Tel: (425) 823-4841
Fax: (425) 823-3805
URL: www.polarisappliedsciences.com

Port of Seattle Pier 64/65 Thin-Layer Sediment Cap Monitoring Results 1994-2004 (D2)

Port of Seattle Pier 64/65 Thin-Layer Sediment Cap and Bell Harbor Marina Projects Habitat Mitigation Monitoring Results 1996-2002 (F1)

Jerry Erickson is a marine scientist with Polaris Applied Sciences, Inc. in Kirkland,Washington.  He has a BS in both zoology and botany from the University of Washington, and in 1988 obtained a MS in fisheries biology, also from the University of Washington.  He has 24 years of experience in marine science and ecology, including the biology of marine invertebrates, juvenile salmonids, finfish, macroalgae and shellfish in the Pacific Northwest and other regions of North America.  He also has expertise on habitat mitigation, sediment chemistry, and the effects of contaminants and oil spills on marine organisms and habitats.

Keith Erickson
Galiano Conservancy Association
Galiano Island B.C. Canada
galiano_conservancy@gulfislands.com

Galiano Up-Close, What Do You Value? (C3)

Keith has worked for the Galiano Conservancy Association for seven years where he has completed projects focused on mapping, planning, monitoring, restoration and education. Keith has a B.Sc. in Natural Resource Conservation from the University of British Columbia. He serves as a volunteer director of the Galiano Island Forest Association where he pursues local forest sustainability, and is a member of the Galiano Island Advisory Planning Commission where he contributes to local government decision making.

Britta L. Eschete
People For Puget Sound
Communication, Education and Outreach Team
Mount Vernon WA
beschete@pugetsound.org

Swinomish Earth Enhancement Celebrations 2003-2005: The Planning Process (D3)

Swinomish Earath Day Enhancement Celebrations Incorporating culture, communities and service projects (P6)

Britta Eschete is one of the co-organizers of the Swinomish Earth Enhancement Celebrations. She serves as the North Sound Outreach and Involvement Coordinator at People For Puget Sound, where she has worked for the past five years. Prior to this, she participated in the Americorps program for two years and is a graduate of Western Washington University in Anthropology/Biology. A native to Washington State, she resides in Mt Vernon, WA with her nine-year old daughter, Noelle, and enjoys travel/staying in hostels, swimming, and cooking.

Nathan R. Evans
Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory
Coastal Assessment and Restoration Group
Sequim, WA
nathan.evans@pnl.gov

Use of Remotely Sensed Data to Characterize Upwelling Conditions on the Washington Coast in Relation to Harmful Algal Blooms (P4)

Mr. Nathan Evans specializes in applying technology to marine systems, emphasizing GIS and remote sensing tools. He has been involved with the ORHAB project for several years, using satellite imagery to identify ocean features that may be associated with Washington Coast red tides. Other research includes developing a nearshore assessment strategy for shoreline management using GIS, which focused on integrating numerous datasets into a single system for prioritizing management actions and identifying restoration opportunities.

Joseph R. Evenson
Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife
PSAMP
Olympia, WA
evensjre@dfw.wa.gov

Distribution and Characteristics of Nocturnal Resting Areas of Surf Scoter (Melanitta perspicillata), White-Winged Scoter (M. fusca), and other Seabird Species in Puget Sound (A5)

Joseph Evenson is a biologist with Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife for the Marine Bird and Mammal Component of PSAMP. He received his B.S. from the Evergreen State College in 1989. He worked as a research biologist with Cascadia Research 1989-95, with an emphasis on marine mammals. Since 1994 he has served in his current position with WDFW where he has been involved with, and/or coordinated, monitoring studies on marine birds and mammals.


F

Duane C. Fagergren
Special Projects Director
Puget Sound Action Team
PO Box 40900
Olympia, WA 98504-0900
dfagergren@psat.wa.gov
Tel: 360-725-5438
Fax: 360-725-5456
URL: www.psat.wa.gov

Northern Anchovy—The Other Forage Fish (P1)

Duane is Special Projects Director for the Puget Sound Action Team, currently working on Hood Canal’s low dissolved oxygen problem, serving as a member of the Northwest Straits Commission, and chairing the management committee of the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program. Duane is a lifetime resident of south Puget Sound and has been involved in the shellfish industry all his life.

Erin A. Falcone
Research Assistant
Cascadia Research Collective
218 ½ W. Fourth Ave.
Olympia,, WA 98501
amazonafaun@aol.com
Tel: 360-943-7325
Fax: 360-943-7026  
URL: www.cascadiaresearch.org

Humpback whales in the Puget Sound/Georgia Strait Region (A2)

Erin Falcone has studied the social behavior and population dynamics of humpback whales in the Revillagigedo Archipelago, Mexico since 1995.  She received a B.S. in Zoology from Humboldt State University in Arcata, CA in 1999.  She began working for Cascadia in July 2003 and deals primarily with humpback whale photo-identification.

Nissa C. Ferm
University of Washington
School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences
Seattle, WA
nissacf@u.washington.edu

Composition of Zooplankton in Ballast Water of Ships Entering Puget Sound (C5)

Received a BS in Marine Biology and Limnology from San Francisco State University in 2000. Worked at the Romberg Tiburon Center for Enviornmental Studies in Tiburon, California for a year focusing on growth rate studies and taxonomy of copepods in the San Francisco estuary. Has been a research scientist at the University of Washington for the past three years working on zooplankton taxonomy and ballast water issues.

David P. Finlayson
University of Washington
School of Oceanography
Seattle, WA
dfinlays@u.washington.edu

The impact of climate variability on the beaches of Puget Sound (F4)

David Finlayson is a Ph.D. Candidate at the School of Oceanography, University of Washington. David is studying the coastal geomorphology of Puget Sound over a range of spatial scales from detailed profiles on Camano Island to Sound-wide inventories of bathymetric lidar. Current work is attempting to characterizes the morphology of beaches throughout the Sound and the natural wave and tidal forces that shape them.

David L. Fluharty
University of Washington
School of Marine Affairs
Seattle, WA
fluharty@u.washington.edu

Getting Started on Integrated Assessment for the Puget Sound Ecosystem (D7)

Jeff A. Fowler
Associate Civil Engineer
City of Seattle
707 S. Plummer St.
Seattle, WA 98134
jeff.fowler@seattle.gov
Tel: 206-233-2540
Fax: 206-386-1168

Infiltration through Natural Drainage Systems in Seattle, Washington (B8)

Jeff Fowler graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from Washington State University in 1998 and a Master of Science in Civil Engineering, with an emphasis in geotechnical engineering, from the University of Washington in 2000. Jeff is a geotechnical engineer with the Seattle Public Utilites Materials Laboratory. He has worked on the natural drainage systems throughout the City since their inception. These projects include S.E.A. Streets, Broadview Greengrid, soon to be constructed Pinehurst Greengrid and the upcoming Venema Greengrid.

Bill Fox
Cosmopolitan Engineering Group
Tacoma, WA
bfox@cosmogrp.com

Balancing Wastewater Disposal and Shellfish Protection at the Very End of Puget Sound (B1)

Bill Fox is Vice President of Cosmopolitan Engineering, with 23 years of experience in modeling, permitting, inspecting and designing wastewater outfalls. He has conducted mixing zone studies for 41 of the 59 municipal WWTP discharges to Puget Sound. He has assisted communities in balancing wastewater disposal needs with often-competing shellfish protection criteria. He has used fluorescent tracers to evaluate the fate and transport of effluents and in the development of TMDL models for Puget Sound.

James H. Franks
University of Washington
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences
Seattle, WA
jamesf@u.washington.edu

Sharks in the Salish Sea: Broad- and fine-scale phlylogeography of the spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) (C2)

James Franks earned a Bachelor of Science in Zoology at the University of Hawaii, Manoa, in 2002, followed by a year of post-baccalaureate research on shark sensory biology and predator-prey interactions at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology. James is currently pursuing his Master’s degree with Dr. Lorenz Hauser in the Marine Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory at the University of Washington.

Ian Fraser
Marine Resources Consultants
Port Townsend WA
jnorris@olympus.net

Hydroacoustic and Underwater Videographic Survey of San Juan County Eelgrass Resources (P1)

Ian Fraser holds a BS degree in mathematics from Haverford College. He has been a research technician at Marine Resources Consultants in Port Townsend, WA since 2001. His current research focuses on underwater videographic methods for monitoring nearshore marine habitats.

Ross E. Freeman
American Rivers, NW Office
Seattle, WA
rfreeman@AmericanRivers.org

Using 3D visualization to portray Elwha River dam-removal (F7)

Ross Freeman joined the NW office of American Rivers as staff scientist/policy advocate after receiving his M.S. in Conservation Biology from Univ. Wisconsin-Madison. He works on dam removal and salmon recovery, Clean Water Act policy, instream flow issues, county land use management, and in-house GIS projects. His prior employment includes positions as environmental science educator, Nat’l Park Service backcountry ranger, rafting program manager, and environmental journalist.

Kurt Fresh
NOAA Fisheries, NWFSC
2725 Montlake Blvd E.
Seattle, 98112
Kurt.Fresh@noaa.gov
Tel: 206-860-6793

Elwha and Glines Canyon dam removals: nearshore restoration and salmon recovery of the central Strait of Juan de Fuca (C4)

Kurt L. Fresh works as a Fisheries Research Biologist for the National  Marine Fisheries Service in Seattle,Washington. Most of Kurts career  has focused on studying the life history and ecology of juvenile salmon  in Washington in riverine, lake, and estuarine habitats. He is currently  working on developing protection and restoration strategies for  estuarine habitats to support recovery of salmon populations. Kurt  received a Masters of Science from the University of Washington.

Elizabeth Freyman
Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection
Environmental Protection Program
Surrey B.C. Canada
liz.freyman@gems1.gov.bc.ca

Measuring and Assessing Environmental Quality in the Lower Mainland Region of British Columbia (P4)

The Environmental Quality Section within the Environmental Protection Division is responsible for groundwater, surface water and air quality. Staff roles include setting stadards, monitoring, reporting and communicating on environmental quality as well as working in partnership with municipalities, regional districts, federal agencies and local stewardship groups. In addition, Environmental Quality staff guide and direct efforts to reduce waste discharges that threaten environmental quality and assist with determining compliance with Provincial regulations.

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Anthony Gabriel
Central Washington University
Department of Geography and Land Studies
Ellensburg, WA
GabrielA@cwu.EDU

An interactive Decision Support System for marine shoreline characterization (F9)

Anthony Gabriel is a faculty member of Central Washington University Dept of Geography and Land Studies and is Co-Director, Resource Management Graduate Program. He has had over 10 years of teaching experience at programs in Wisconsin,Washington and Canada . His research focuses on studies of the relationships between biophysical processes and socio-economic systems. He is continuing to develop, and test techniques that apply results of biophysical studies to wetland, shoreline, and Watershed management.

Howard E. Garrett
Orca Network
, WA 
howard@orcanetwork.org

Do Orcas Use Symbols? (A2)

Howard began working with the Center for Whale Research in 1980, as field researcher and as editor of Cetus, the journal of the Whale Museum. In 1985 Garrett wrote New England Whales, describing the whales and dolphins of coastal New England in their ecological context. In 1996 Garrett wrote Orcas In Our Midst, depicting the natural history of Puget Sound’s orca population, their dependence on salmon, and in turn how salmon depend on healthy watersheds. Volume 2 of Orcas In Our Midst is currently in production.

James E. Gawel
Assistant Professor
University of Washington, Tacoma
Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
Tacoma, WA 98402
jimgawel@u.washington.edu
Tel: (253) 692-5815
Fax: (253) 692-4639

The Effect of Heavy Metal Pollution in Aquatic Environments on Metallothionein Production in Mytilus sp. (A10)

Jim Gawel is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Chemistry in the Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences Program at the University of Washington, Tacoma.  His research interests are primarily concerned with the fate and transport of metal pollutants in the environment and monitoring of metal stress in biological systems, both plant and animal.  Within this general context, the scope of his work ranges from agricultural and forested terrestrial systems to marine systems in urban areas. 

Guy Gelfenbaum
US Geological Survey
Menlo Park CA
ggelfenbaum@usgs.gov

Coastal Habitats In Puget Sound: A Research Plan in support of Puget Sound Nearshore Ecosystem Restoration (F3)

Dr. Guy Gelfenbaum is an Oceanographer with the US Geological Survey in Menlo Park, CA.  He received his BS from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in Geology in 1978, and his MS in 1982 and his PhD in 1998 from the University of Washington, Seattle in Oceanography.  His research interests include coastal processes, sediment transport dynamics, and large-scale coastal change.  Dr. Gelfenbaum has studied coastal processes on the west coast of Florida, on the Alabama/Mississippi coast and more recently on the Washington coast and in Alaska.  Dr. Gelfenbaum currently leads the USGS’s Coastal Habitats in Puget Sound Project and is a member of the Nearshore Science Team with the Puget Sound Restoration Program.

Susan A. Genualdi
Oregon State University
Dept of Chemistry
Corvallis OR
genualds@onid.orst.edu

Atomospheric Transport of Persistent Organic Pollutants to Cheeka Peak Observatory from 2002-2004 (B4)

Susie Genualdi is a graduate student in the Department of Chemistry at Oregon State University. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Tennessee in Environmental Science and Chemistry in May of 2004. 

Douglas A. George
Oceanographer
United States Geological Survey
Coastal and Marine Geology
345 Middlefield Rd, MS 999
Menlo Park CA 94025
dgeorge@usgs.gov
Tel: 650-329-5376   
Fax: 650-329-5190

The Deschutes Estuary Restoration Feasibility Study: development of a process-based morphological model (C1)

Douglas George is an Oceanographer in the Western Region Coastal and Marine Geology Program at the USGS in Menlo Park, CA. Mr. George has an MSc in oceanography from Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia, Canada, an MS in journalism from Columbia University in New York City, NY and worked at the National Academy of Science in Washington, DC on restoring and protecting the Mississippi Delta. His research interests include sediment transport, wetland restoration and heavy metals.

Kirby W. Gilbert
Battelle
Pacific Northwest Division - Marine Sciences Lab
Sequim, WA
gilbertk@battelle.org

Puget Sound Georgia Basin Shoreline Management Planning (F10)

Kirby Gilbert, is a NEPA Program Manager and Public Policy Specialist for Battelle’s Pacific Northwest Division, Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sequim,Washington. He has more than 19 years experience in environmental impact analysis and preparation of multidisciplinary planning documents for a variety of water and energy projects. Mr. Gilbert holds a Masters of Science degree in Resource Geography from Oregon State University and a Bachelors degree in Environmental Science from Washington State University

Linda A. Gilkeson
Head, State of Environment Reporting
BC Ministry of Water, Land & Air Protection
PO Box 9335
Stn Prov Govt, Victoria  BC  V8W 9M1
Victoria B.C. Canada
Linda.Gilkeson@gems3.gov.bc.ca
Tel: 250-387-9410 
Fax: 250-387-8894
URL: http://wlapwww.gov.bc.ca/soerpt

Improving the Effectiveness of Indicator Reporting: The BC Coast and Marine Environment Project (C7)

The British Columbia Coast and Marine Environment Project (P5)

Linda Gilkeson has been the Head of the State of Environment Reporting unit in the BC Ministry of Water, Land & Air Protection since 2002. From 1991 to 2002 she coordinated the Ministry’s Integrated Pest Management program and has been an author or editor of over a dozen pest management training manuals and books. She received her Ph.D. from McGill University in 1986.

Stuart Glasoe
Technical and Policy Specialist
Puget Sound Action Team
PO Box 40900
Olympia, WA 98504-0900
sglasoe@psat.wa.gov
Tel: 360-725-5449
Fax: 360-725-5456
URL: sglasoe@psat.wa.gov

New Approaches to Shellfish Protection in Puget Sound (A8)

Literature Review and Analysis of Coastal Urbanization and Microbial Contamination of Shellfish Growing Areas (P2)

Stuart Glasoe has served as program specialist and local liaison for the Puget Sound Action Team since 1991, focusing mainly on shellfish protection, nonpoint pollution, watershed management and community outreach. He has a Masters in Regional Planning from Washington State University and bachelors degrees in environmental science and earth science from Minot State University in North Dakota.

Amy M. Glaub
University of Washington
Friday Harbor Laboratories
Seattle, WA
glauba@u.washington.edu

Potential impacts of low dissolved oxygen on eelgrass (Zostera marina) in Hood Canal (P2)

Amy Glaub is as a research technician at University of Washington’s Friday Harbor Laboratories, working on joint projects with UW and the Nearshore Habitat Program in Washington State Department of Natural Resources. She has a B.S. degree in biology from Boston College. She is currently completing her master’s degree in Natural Science/Science Education at Huxley College, Western Washington University, where she is focusing on K-12 marine education.

Melissa Gledhill
Environment Canada
Vancouver B.C. Canada

A Novel Approach to Sample for River Water Quality in the Fraser Estuary (F1)

Melissa Gledhill has worked for the Department of Environment as an Intermediate Ecosystem Technician for two years.  She currently works in the Aquatic Sciences Section of the Environmental Conservation Branch investigating new and emerging issues related to water quality in the Region.

Fred A. Goetz
Army Corps of Engineers
Environmental Resources Section
Seattle, WA
fred.goetz@usace.army.mil

Puget Sound Bull Trout the Unrecognized Anadromous Salmonid of the Pacific Northwest (A4)

Formulating a Restoration Plan for the Puget Sound Nearshore (F3)

Fred Goetz, Fish Biologist and Science Lead for the Puget Sound Nearshore Ecosystem Restoration Project for the Army Corps of Engineers.  His research concerns riverine, lake, and nearshore aquatic communities and  restoration actionsprimarily natural estuarine/coastal marine ecosystem-, community- and habitat-level interactions; predator-prey relationships; organization of food webs; landscape ecology and restoration.  He holds a B.S. (1985) from Michigan State University and M.S. (1994) from the Dept of Fish and Wildlife at Oregon State University.

Judah D. Goldberg
, WA Department of Ecology
Coastal and Estuarine Assessment Unit
Olympia, WA
jgol461@ecy.wa.gov

Detection of the harmful algal species Pseudo-nitzschia and associated particulate and dissolved domoic acid with concurrent water column quality and nutrient concentrations obtained from a moored automated water sampler (P2)

I became involved with research on Pseudo-nitzschia and domoic acid in 1998, while at UC Santa Cruz. During 2000-2003 I was part of an ECOHAB funded project studying the extent of domoic acid contamination within the benthos in Monterey Bay, CA (paper being submitted). I graduated from Moss Landing Marine Laboratories in 2003 (MS Marine Sciences) and moved to Washington State to work as a biological oceanographer with the Department of Ecology.

Todd E. Golumbia
Gulf Islands National Park Reserve
Parks Canada Agency
Sidney B.C. Canada
todd.golumbia@pc.gc.ca

Gulf Islands National Park Reserve: A Conservation Assessment Review (D10)

Todd Golumbia, MSc Forest Ecology (University of British Columbia), BSc Biology (Saskatchewan), Ecologist, Gulf Islands National Park Reserve of Canada. After working on the Haida Gwaii Archipelago (Queen Charlotte Islands) for 10 years as the ecologist for Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve and Haida Heritage Site. Todd has recently relocated to the Southern Gulf Islands Region to work in the newly established Gulf Islands National Park Reserve. Prior to these west coast locations, Todd has worked at several National Parks across western Canada as an ecologist and a park warden since 1982.

Stephanie Grand
University of British Columbia
Resource Management and Environmental Studies
Vancouver B.C. Canada
sgrand@interchange.ubc.ca

Effects of forest harvesting on soil amorphous aluminosilicates (imogolite-type material) and implications for water quality (F2)

Stephanie is a PhD. candidate at the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability at the University of British Columbia. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Earth Science from the University of Lyon 1, France. After completing her undergraduate degree and working for a year in the field of exploration geology, she decided to further pursue her interest in environmental issues and started graduate studies in 2002. Her main academic interests include soil and water resources conservation.

Pete Granger
University of Washington
Washington Sea Grant Program
Seattle, WA
pgranger@u.washington.edu

Chum Salmon Carcass Removal in Hood Canal Tribal Commercial Fishery (D6)

Pete Granger has led the Washington Sea Grant Program Marine Advisory Services since 2001.  He is also a seafood industry specialist with WSGP.  Granger has been a commercial salmon fishermen in Alaska and on Puget Sound.  He has processed, sold, and marketed salmon and other PNW and Alaska seafood.  He also lobbied for the Washington salmon farmers for several years.

Correigh M. Greene
NOAA Fisheries
Environmental Conservation
Seattle, WA
correigh.greene@noaa.gov

Tributary junctions as hotspots for biological productivity and diversity (C1)

Dr. Correigh Greene has worked as a research biologist for three years at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center. He is currently studying biological habitat relationships, movements, and life history variability of salmonid populations. His methods combine modeling efforts, statistical analyses of time series population data, and empirical studies of ecology and behavior at juvenile life history stages in salmon.

H. Gary Greene
San Jose State University
MossLanding Marine Labs
MossLanding CA
greene@mlml.calstate.edu

Marine Benthic Habitat Mapping in the San Juan Islands(P4)

H. Gary Greene obtained a PhD in Marine Geology from Stanford University in 1977. He is presently Professor of Geological Oceanography at MLML and heads up the Center for Habitat Studies where he is actively mapping marine benthic habitats using remote sensing geophysical tools. He is also a senior research scientist with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute where he studies submarine canyon geological processes and mass wasting events and their potential to generate tsunamis.

Eric E. Grossman
US Geological Survey
Coastal and Marine Geology
Santa Cruz CA
egrossman@usgs.gov

Characterizing natural vs. human-related change in Puget Sound deltaic habitats (F4)

Dr.Eric Grossman is a research geologist with the US Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Geology Program in Santa Cruz, California. His research focuses on Quaternary coastal and marine geology, seafloor mapping, coastal evolution, sea level and climate change, coral reef geology, and habitat change in deltaic and eelgrass environments. Eric received his Ph.D. and M.S. from the University of Hawaii and his B.A. from the University of California Berkeley.

Donald Gunderson
University of Washington
School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences
Seattle, WA
dgun@u.washington.edu

Changes in growth and recruitment of the Puget Sound rockfish (Sebastes emphaeus) and implications for its role in the reef community in northern Puget Sound (E5)

Donald R. Gunderson is a Professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington. His research deals with the population dynamics and management of marine fish.

Kathryn Gwilym, PE
Project Manager
SvR Design Company
815 Western Avenue, Suite 400
Seattle, WA  98104
kathyg@svrdesign.com
Tel: 206-223-0326
Fax: 206-223-0125
URL: www.svrdesign.com

The Integration of Natural Drainage in an Urban Subdivision (F5)

Kathryn Gwilym, PE is a civil engineer who has worked on several complex, and large-scale housing developments.  She is the project manager to the High Point’s natural drainage system, one of the first natural drainage systems to be implemented for an urban housing development of this density and scale.

Richard B. Gwozdz
Western Washington University
Environmental Science
Bellingham, WA
gwozdzr@cc.wwu.edu

Simulating the effects of sea-level rise on Zostera marina production in Padilla Bay, WA (P4)

Richard Gwozdz received a Bachelors degree in biology from Western Washington University in 2003. He is currently working towards a Masters degree in Marine and Estuarine Science at Huxley College of the Environment, Western Washington University. He is the recipient of the 2004 NOAA NERRS Graduate Research Fellowship, the 2004 National Fish and Wildlife -Budweiser Conservation Scholarship, and the 2004 Anchor Environmental Scholarship.

H

Kimberly J. Hageman
Oregon State University
Environmental & Molecular Toxicology
Corvallis Oregon
kim.hageman@orst.edu

Semi-Volatile Organic Pollutants in Snow from National Parks of the Pacific Northwest (B4)

Kimberly Hageman is an environmental chemist interested in the fate of pollutants in the environment and particularly in their atmospheric transport and deposition. She is currently involved in the Western Airborne Contaminants Assessment Project (WACAP) which is sponsored by the United States National Park Service. She is a post-doctoral research associate at Oregon State University in the laboratory of Dr. Staci Simonich. She received a PhD in analytical chemistry at Oregon State University in 2003.

Susan B. Haid
Greater Vancouver Regional District
Policy and Planning
Burnaby B.C. Canada
susan.haid@gvrd.bc.ca

Biodiversity Conservation Strategy for the Greater Vancouver Region (B9)

Susan Haid is a Senior Environmental Planner with the Greater Vancouver Regional District where she develops regional growth management and environmental land use policy and plans. She is working on the review of the region’s growth strategy, the development of a Biodiversity Conservation Strategy, watershed planning, environmental assessments and participates in multi-agency environmental initiatives.  She has over 12 years experience in environmental planning in various agencies. Susan has a Master of Science degree in Planning and honours degrees in Biology and Landscape Architecture.  She is a member of the Canadian Institute of Planners and the Canadian Society of Landscape Architects.

Anna Hall
University of British Columbia
Marine Mammal Research Unit
Vancouver B.C. Canada
hall@zoology.ubc.ca

Science and industry: Bridging the gap to identify harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) seasonal movements and habitat use. (A2)

The evolution of commercial whale watching - action plan for 2005 (E10)

I am currently researching porpoise habitat selection and foraging behaviour for my PhD thesis (UBC). I am employed as a marine naturalist in the wildlife viewing industry (1995 - present), and as the Executive Director of the Whale, WAtch Operators Association - North West. I participate on the Killer Whale Recovery Team (Fisheries and Oceans Canada), and I volunteer with the Marine Mammal Research Group, the West Coast Anti-Whaling Society, and the Whaleman Foundation.

Nathalie J. Hamel
University of Washington
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences
Seattle, WA
nhamel@u.washington.edu

Understanding seabird individual movement patterns to assess vulnerability to bycatch in gillnet fisheries (A5)

Nathalie is in her second year of a Ph.D. at UW. Originally from Quebec, Canada, she has studied threatened populations of birds in the terrestrial environment before switching to marine  systems

Stuart Hamilton
Head, Hydrology Research and Development
Environment Canada
401 Burrard Street
Vancouver, B.C. V6C 3S5
Stuart.hamilton@ec.gc.ca
Tel: (604) 713 9536
Fax: (604) 664 9066

The art of applying environmental science at a small watershed scale: A case study, Tseycum Creek, British Columbia. (E6)

Stuart Hamilton uses hydrological modeling techniques and environmental monitoring technologies to explore the role of water in ecosystem function. He has developed applications for hydrological forecasting, prediction of the role of landslides and forest fires on sediment and nutrient transport and fate, effects of climate change, and for water temperature prediction.


Dan Hannafious
Hood Canal Salmon Enhancement Group
Belfair, WA
hcwater@hctc.com

HCDOP Citizens Monitoring Program: integrating a volunteer monitoring effort with the needs of a partnership-based research program (D6)

Dan grew up in the Seattle area, attended college in the Bellingham (WWU) and received his degree in Wildlife Sciences from Oregon State University. He lived in Alaska for 10 years, worked as a biologist and played as a dog musher. He works for the Hood Canal Salmon Enhancement Group, and is currently working with the research related to the low DO events in Hood Canal as part of the Hood Canal Dissolved Oxygen Program.            

Brad Hanson
NOAA NWFSC
Seattle, WA
brad.hanson@noaa.gov

A tale of two porpoise species: Seasonal movements and habitat use of Dall's and harbor porpoise in the Salish Sea as determined by radio-telemetry (A2)

Dr. Brad Hanson has been a wildlife biologist with NOAA Fisheries for the past 15 years. He is currently involved a variety of research projects on southern resident killer whales at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center.

F. Joan Hardy
Washington State Department of Health
Office of Environmental Health Assessments
Olympia, WA
joan.hardy@doh.wa.gov

Evaluation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs), Mercury, and DDT in Rockfish, English sole, Chinook Salmon and Coho Salmon from Puget Sound Washington (A9)

Joan Hardy is a toxicologist with the Office of Environmental Health Assessments, Washington State Department of Health.  She has worked for the state since 1989.  She received her BA from Whitman College, MS and Ph.D. from the University of Washington, College of Fisheries.  Her projects have included work on aquatic plant management, toxic cyanobacteria, human health criteria for contaminated sediments, and contaminants in fish.

Sheila Harrington
Land Trust Alliance of B.C.
Saltspring Island, B.C. Canada
sheila@landtrustalliance.bc.ca

Island Community Maps & Conservation in the Salish Sea Region (E8)

The Islands in the Salish Sea Community Mapping Project (P6)

Sheila Harrington has been Executive Director of LTA The Land Trust Alliance of BC since its founding in 1997. She has worked in the field of environmental education for 15 years, as a publisher and editor of several books, manuals and for two years, a national magazine, Positive Vibrations. She is editor of related publications including: Giving the Land a Voice, Mapping Our Home Places, and Building Green on the Rural Gulf Islands. She also coordinated the Sustainable Salt Spring Roundtable, an international Green Building Conference, and has spoken and presented at many seminars and conferences. Her formal training is in both education and fine arts which plays out in her interest and work in community and local mapping, green building and the sustainability of both natural and cultural heritage values.

Julio J. Harvey
University of Washington
Department of Biology
Seattle, WA
jbharvey@u.washington.edu

Development of molecular diagnostic tools to assess the introduction, establishment and ecology of invasive species in Puget Sound (C5)

Currently I am a staff researcher in the Department of Biology at the University of Washington working to develope molecular diagnostic tools for monitering the  ecology of invasive species in marine environments.  I recently completed the doctoral program in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California Santa Cruz (2004) where my research focused on the coevolutionary biology and molecular ecology of fungal endophytes infecting marine brown algal hosts along the north American west coast.

Marco Hatch
University of Washington
Seattle, WA
marcoh@u.washington.edu

The Salish Sea: Historic Conditions (D1)

Marco Hatch is finishing his Bachelor of Science in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington. He is currently working on his senior thesis titled “Identification of archeological salmon remains utilizing molecular technologies.” Marco will continue the study of archeological DNA through his graduate studies at Scripps Institute of Oceanography.

Donna D. Hauser
University of Washington
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences
Seattle, WA
dhauser@u.washington.edu

Representing and exploring summer distribution patterns of Southern Resident killer whales (Orcinus orca) (P1)

Donna Hauser is a Master’s of Science candidate at the University of Washington, who is interested in marine mammal spatial ecology and how environmental conditions affect habitat use.  Her current research explores the spatial and temporal summer distribution patterns of the so-called Southern Resident killer whales in Washington and British Columbia inshore Waters.  Donna is combining the use of historical and field-collected location data to spatially model Southern Resident distribution patterns in a geographical information system (GIS) context.

Lorenz Hauser
University of Washington
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences
Seattle, WA
lhauser@u.washington.edu

Finding Nemo in Puget Sound: parental identification of brown rockfish juveniles (C2)

Lorenz Hauser is originally from Vienna, Austria, where he did an MS in fish ecology. After a PhD at the University of Swansea, UK, he worked as a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Hull, UK. In 2002, he joined the faculty of the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington, and is currently working on several projects on the population genetics of marine fishes in the Puget Sound.

Danelle W. Heatwole
The Nature Conservancy of Washington
Seattle, WA
dheatwole@tnc.org

Estuarine habitat characterization and distribution: potential evidence for landscape-scale dike impacts (F6)

Danelle Heatwole received her M.S. in Aquatic and Fishery Sciences from the University of Washington in 2004. Her graduate research investigated relationships between salt marsh insect assemblages and their habitats in pocket estuaries of northern Puget Sound. She now works as a Field Biologist for The Nature Conservancy of Washington and is developing a habitat restoration and long-term monitoring program for their Port Susan Bay Preserve.

Nancy E. Helm
US EPA, Region 10
Seattle, WA
helm.nancy@epa.gov

Georgia Basin - Puget Sound International Airshed Strategy (B5)

Nancy Helm is a staff member of the Office of Air, Waste and Toxics of the US Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, where she serves as air quality liaison for the State of Washington and lead staff for the Georgia Basin - Puget Sound International Airshed Strategy. Nancy has been with the EPA for 16 years. She has held positions in several environmental programs, primarily in the areas of policy development and project management.

William D. Henwood
Parks Canada, Vancouver B.C. Canada
bill.henwood@pc.gc.ca

A Marine Atlas for the Proposed National Marine Conservation Area in the Southern Strait of Georgia (D9)

Mr. Henwood has been a park planner for over 27 years, the last 20 with Parks Canada in the field of establishing new national parks and national marine conservation areas.  Mr. Henwood has most recently been involved in the establishment of the new national park in the Gulf Islands and is currently the Project Manager for the study to assess the feasibility of establishing a national marine conservation area in the southern Strait of Georgia.

Chad Herring
Scientific Technician
16018 Mill Creek Boulevard, Mail Stop: TB44
Mill Creek, WA 98012-1296
herricjh@dfw.wa.gov
Tel: 425-775-1311 ext. 124

Distribution and Abundance of Pacific Herring (Clupea pallasi) Spawn Deposition for Cherry Point Washington stock, 1973-2004. (A4)

Paul K. Hershberger
Marrowstone Marine Station
US Geological Survey, Biological Resources Discipl
Nordland, WA
phershberger@usgs.gov

Larval Herring Acquire Resistance after Challenge with Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (A7)

Dr. Paul Hershberger is Station Leader of the Marrowstone Marine Station and a member of the affiliate faculty at the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington.  His research interests include understanding basic ecological disease processes affecting populations of wild marine and anadromous fishes in the Pacific Northwest.

Russell P. Herwig
University of Washington
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences
Seattle, WA
herwig@u.washington.edu

Defending Our Shores: Ballast Water Treatment Technologies (C5)

Russ Herwig is a Research Associate Professor in the University of Washington (UW) School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. For the past three years, Jeff Cordell and he have led a UW team that is investigating ballast water. The UW group is sampling the ballast water in ships that enter Puget Sound. In addition, they are evaluating the efficacies of potential ballast water treatment systems in small bench scale to full shipboard experiments.

Kollin F. Higgins
King County
Department of Natural Resources and Parks
Seattle, WA
Kollin.higgins@metrokc.gov

Spatial Relationships between Beneficial and Detrimental Nearshore Habitat Parameters in WRIA 9 and the City of Seattle (B7)

Kollin Higgins has worked for King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks for the last 5 years. While at King County he has participated in a variety of projects, including marine and freshwater fish surveys, salmon recovery planning and shoreline master planning. He has a Masters degree in fisheries policy from the UW school of Marine Affairs and a Bachelors of Science in Marine Biology from Humboldt State University in California.

Larry Hildebrand
Environment Canada-Atlantic Region
Dartmouth Nova Scotia Canada
larry.hildebrand@ec.gc.ca

The Coastal Zone Canada Association: Ten Years of Moving the ICOM Markers (C8)

Larry Hildebrand is the Manager of Sustainable Communities and Ecosystems for Environment Canada, Atlantic Region, in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. Larry has worked for the Canadian federal government for the past 26 years in a variety of positions related to integrated coastal and ocean management. He is also Adjunct Professor of Environmental Studies and Marine Affairs at Dalhousie University and conducts training and capacity building work around the world. He is co-founder and Vice President-Liaison for the Coastal Zone Canada Association.

Sayre Hodgson
Salmon Recovery Research Biologist
Nisqually Indian Tribe
Natural Resources
12501 Yelm Hwy, SE
Olympia, WA 98506
shodgson@nwifc.org
Tel: (360) 438-8687

Juvenile Salmon Baseline Studies in the Nisqually Estuary; 2002-2004 Results (A3)

Sayre Hodgson is a Salmon Research Biologist with the Nisqually Indian Tribe. She has coordinated the tribe’s fish monitoring in the Nisqually Estuary since 2002. She has a Master’s in Fisheries from the University of Washington.

Jan L. Holmes
Island County WSU Beach, WAtchers
Coupeville, WA
janholme@whidbey.net

Island County WSU Beach, WAtcher Intertidal monitoring Program: A model for volunteer based data collection (P6)

Education: B.S. Environmental Science from Huxley College, M.S. Marine and Estuarine Science from Western Washington University.  Jan helped develop the Beach Watcher monitoring program and has been a coordinator of the program since it’s conception. Current work includes teaching marine biology classes and co-coordinating recurrent training each year to Beach Watcher volunteers, as well as supervising teams in the field. Her other interests are plankton and seaweed ecology.

Kirstin K. Holsman
University of Washington
School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences
Seattle, WA
kkari@u.washington.edu

Elements of Ecosystem Based Management: An Estuarine Case Study (P5)

K. Holsman is a PhD student in the School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences. Her work to date has focused on estuarine life history aspects of juvenile Dungeness crab, Cancer magister, and food web and landscape ecology.

Jon M. Honea
University of Washington
College of Forest Resources
Seattle, WA
jhonea@u.washington.edu

Seasonal Response of an Aquatic Macroinvertebrate Community to Salmon Spawning (A3)

Ph.D. Candidate in Ecosystem Analysis at the UW College of Forest Resources

Gregory Hood
Skagit River System Cooperative
LaConner, WA
ghood@skagitcoop.org

Estuarine habitat restoration in the context of rising sea-level: planning on a landscape scale. (F9)

Dr. Gregory Hood is a restoration ecologist whose research focuses on estuarine ecology and geomorphology. He recieved his PhD from the University of Washington, School of Fisheries.

Sasha Horst
Northwest Straits Commission
Mount Vernon WA
horst@nwstraits.org

Impacts of Human Activities: Derelict Fishing Gear in Puget Sound (F2)

Sasha Horst is the Project Specialist for the Northwest Straits Commission, a citizen-based approach to achieving ecosystem health in the marine environment. She coordinates local citizen committees to help restore and protect marine Waters, habitats, species based on local priorities. Her background is in education, and she manages and implements the Commission’s outreach program. Sasha has degree in Education and Music from Western Washington University and has been with the Northwest Straits Commission since 2001.            

Vanessa M. Howard
Portland State University
Environmental Sciences and Resourcesf
Portland OR
vhoward@pdx.edu

An Estuarine Invader - How Oregon's Spartina Response Plan is Reaching Beyond Borders (C9)

Vanessa Howard is a second year master’s student in the Environmental Sciences and Resources Department at Portland State University. She graduated from UC Santa Cruz in 1996 with a degree in Community Studies. Since joining the graduate program at PSU, Vanessa has worked with the guidance of Dr. Mark Sytsma at the Center for Lakes and Reservoirs to help implement Oregon’s Spartina Response Plan.

Elsie J. Hulsizer
King County Wastewater Treatment Division
Natural Resources and Pipes
Seattle, WA
elsie.hulsizer@metrokc.gov

Controlling mercury from dental waste: A success story (B1)

Elsie Hulsizer has been Industrial Waste Program Manager at King County since 1987.  She and a staff of 18 enforce King County and federal industrial pretreatment regulations.  In 2003 the program won an award for excellence from the U.S. EPA.  Ms. Hulsizer has a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in Biological Oceanography from the University of Washington. 

Peter Hummel
Anchor Environmental
Senior Landscape Architect
1423 3rd Avenue, Suite 300
Seattle, WA  98101
phummel@anchorenv.com
Tel: (206) 287-9130
Fax: (206) 287-9131
URL: www.anchorenv.com

Seahurst Park: Restoring Nearshore Habitat and Reconnecting Natural Sediment Supply Processes (F7)

Peter Hummel is a landscape architect with 20 years of experience in shoreline and Water resource projects. He leads many of Anchor Environmental's habitat restoration projects. Peter has extensive experience with projects involving environmentally sensitive areas, permitting, community involvement, and multi-disciplinary design teams. He has experience with habitat restoration design on Puget Sound shoreline projects including beach and estuary sites and has seen numerous projects through planning, design, construction, and monitoring.

Stephanie Hurley
Washington Department of Transportation
Seattle WA
hurleys@wsdot.wa.gov

Great (Wet) Streets: Merging Street Design and Stormwater Management to Improve Neighborhood Streets (B2)

Stephanie Hurley's background at the University of California, Berkeley, WAs in Conservation and Resource Studies. She has worked for the last two years as a research assistant and consultant for Seattle Public Utilities, focusing predominantly on maintenance for Natural Drainage Systems stormwater projects.Kim D Hyatt


Kim Hyatt
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Nanaimo B.C. Canada
hyattk@pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Impacts of Climate Variation and Change Events on Salmon Populations in Southern British Columbia: Implications for Conservation and Restoration (E1)

Dr. Hyatt is a research scientist at DFO’s Pacific Biological Station (PBS) in Nanaimo, B.C. He heads the Salmon in Regional Ecosystems Program there and is an adjunct professor in the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability at UBC. Current research interests include: (1) food web manipulations in sockeye salmon nursery lakes, (2) responses of fish and fisheries to climate change, (3) ecosystem based approaches to salmon management and (4) development of information systems and tools to improve fisheries management.

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Paul Inghram
Berryman & Henigar
Seattle, WA
inghram@bhiinc.com

Opportunities and Limits of Regulations (C8)

Paul Inghram is a senior land use planner with more than 10 years professional experience. He was a prime contributor to Washington State’s Critical Areas Assistance Handbook, published in 2003. He has assisted several cities in Western Washington with development of shoreline master programs, critical areas protection regulations, and reports on best available science. He has presented environmental planning topics numerous times, and has lectured on environmental planning at the University of Washington.


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Barbara J. James
Talaqtala, Swinomish Indian Tribal member

Swinomish Earth Enhancement Celebrations 2003-2005: The Planning Process (D3)

Served on the Swinomish Tribal Senate for 13 years.  Committee involvement in:  Health Educaiton & Social Services, Tribal Enrollment, Elder Protection.   Activities and Events I have helped organize:  N.W. Indian Youth Conferences, Swinomish Earth Enhancement Day, Swinomish CleanUp Days (Spring & Fall); Swinomish Sobriety Dinners yearly, and UNTOLD Teen Tobacco Events. I am a wife, mother of 3 sons, grandmother of 6, expecting #7 and auntie to many.

Sabine Jessen
Conservation Director
Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - British Columbia Chapter
CPAWS-BC
555 West Georgia St, suite 601
Vancouver, BC V6B 1Z6
sjessen@cpawsbc.org
Tel: (604) 685-7445
Fax: (604) 685-6449
URL: www.cpawsbc.org

An NGO Initiative for developing community engagement in the development of a marine protected area in the Southern Strait of Georgia (E8)

Sabine is the Conservation Director for the BC Chapter of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, where she focuses on directing the marine conservation programs. She has worked on marine conservation issues since 1993.  Sabine holds a Masters Degree in Geography, specializing in coastal zone management and environmental regulation.  She has served as an Advisor to Fisheries and Oceans Canada, the BC Parks Department, the British Columbia Commission on Resources and Environment, and Economic Council of Canada.  From 1998 to 2004, Sabine was a member of the Minister’s Advisory Council on Oceans.

Mark R.S. Johannes
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Stock Assessment
Nanaimo B.C. Canada
mark@fishclimate.ca

Climate change in Puget Sound and Georgia Basin 2005: Conference Session and

Panel Discussion (E2)

Exploring adaptation to climate variation and change: important issues and lessons to be learned in Puget Sound and the Georgia Basin. (E2)

I am the Fisheries Sector National Coordinator of the Canadian Climate Impacts and Adaptation Research Network (C-CIARN) and also a salmon research scientist. I participate as a visiting fisheries scientist at UVIC and teach UVIC Freshwater Restoration. I am also a Director with the Northwest Ecosystem Institute, a research based NGO. My research interests include: aquatic ecosystems; climate research; watershed planning / integrated ecosystem management; salmon ecology / natural history; habitat enhancement and restoration.

Jim Johannessen
Coastal Geologic Services
Coastal Geologist
701 Wilson Ave
Bellingham, WA  98225-7348
coastalgeo@comcast.net
Tel: (360) 647-1845

Feeder Bluff and Accretion Shoreform Mapping in Island County for Nearshore Habitat Restoration and Conservation (F4)

Beach Rehabilitation and Monitoring at Marine Park, Bellingham: Recreating an Urban Beach in Bay-Wide Habitat Restoration Context (F8)

Beach Restoration/Rehabilitation in Puget Sound, WA: 5 Years of Monitoring at Two Projects and Lessons Learned (P3)

Jim Johannessen, through Coastal Geologic Services in Bellingham, specializes in beach processes, coastal restoration, and applied coastal management, including soft shore protection. He has designed numerous coastal restoration and rehabilitation projects and performed coastal and nearshore assessments in all Puget Sound and Northwest Straits counties. Mr. Johannessen has a MS from Western Washington Univ. and a BS from Univ. Rhode Island, and is a Licensed Engineering Geologist in Washington. Jim has worked in the consulting field locally since 1984, and started Coastal Geologic Services in 1993.

Sophia C. Johannessen
Institute of Ocean Sciences
Sidney B.C. Canada
johannessen@pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca

A collaborative ambient research and monitoring program in the southern Strait of Georgia (E7)

Sophia Johannessen is a Research Scientist at the Institute of Ocean Sciences in Sidney, B.C.

Lyndal L. Johnson
Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Environmental Conservation Division
Seattle, WA
Lyndal.L.Johnson@noaa.gov

Xenoestrogen exposure and altered reproductive timing in Puget Sound English sole  (A10)

Lyndal Johnson leads the Reproductive Toxicology Team in the Ecotoxicology and Environmental Fish Health Program of the Environmental Conservation Division at NOAA Fisheries’ Northwest Fisheries Science Center is Seattle.  Her team has conducted a number of studies on the effects of chemical contaminants on reproduction and endocrine function in Puget Sound flatfish, including a current project with Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife to survey Puget Sound bottomfish for exposure to environmental estrogens.

David W. Jones
University of Washington
Applied Physics Laboratory
Seattle, WA
dwjones@apl.washington.edu

Boater Information System (P6)

David W. Jones is a senior oceanographer at the Applied Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington. He is a Principal Investigator on several Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making research projects. His main research focus has been the study of how environmental information is used in certain key decision-making tasks. He is also a retired U.S. Navy commander, with 21 years of active duty experience in naval meteorology, oceanography, and human systems issues.

J. Murray Journeay
Research Scientist
Geological Survey of Canada
Natural Resources Canada
101-605 Robson Street
Vancouver, BC V6B 5J3
Murray.Journeay@nrcan.gc.ca
Tel: 604-666-1130
Fax: 604-666-1124
URL: http://sdki.nrcan.gc.ca/index_e.php

Traversing the boundaries between science and policy: finding Pathways for place-based community planning (B9)

Murray Journeay is a geologist and informatics specialist with the Earth Sciences Sector of Natural Resources Canada, and co-leader of an interdisciplinary project (Pathways) aimed at building a web-based architectural framework to situate and promote the use of integrated earth science information, knowledge and expertise within a broader societal context.  Current projects focus on groundwater resource management, hazard mitigation and sustainability planning in the Georgia Basin and Okanagan Basin regions, with an emphasis on collaborative place-based planning and community design.


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Tom Kantz
Pierce County
Special Projects
University Place WA
tkantz@co.pierce.wa.us

The Pierce County, Washington, Coordinated Salmon Habitat Protection and Restoration Strategy (P3)

The Development of Nearshore Stressor Conceptual Models for Chinook Recovery Planning in South Puget Sound. (P4)

Tom Kantz, Ph.D., is an Environmental Biologist with Pierce County Washington. He manages the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) model database for the Puyallup, White, and Clover-Chamber Creek watersheds. In addition, he incorporates EDT results into the County GIS, and represents the County at regional salmon recovery planning processes. Tom has extensive experience in salmon habitat and wetland restoration.

Erik Karlsen
Planning Consultant and Royal Roads Univeristy
B.C. Canada
ekarlsen@telus.net

The Georgia Basin Action Plan: Building on Success and Meeting Ongoing Challenges (C8)

Erik Karlsen is a Fellow of the Canadian Institute of Planners, an Associate Faculty member in the Masters of Environment and Management program at Royal Roads University, Chair of the Smart Growth on the Ground Advisory Committee, and a member of the BC Water and Waste Association’s Water Sustainability Committee. He has been associated with Georgia Basin — Puget Sound sustainability initiatives since the early 1990’s and was co-wrap-up speaker for the 2003 GB-PS Research Conference.

Mitsuhiro Kawase
Associate Professor
School of Oceanography, University of Washington
Box 355351
Seattle, WA 98195-3551
kawase@ocean.washington.edu
Tel: (206) 543-0766
Fax: (206) 685-3354
URL: http://tima.ocean.washington.edu/

Simulation of Puget Sound hydrography and circulation, Spring - Summer 2004 (E4)

Physical oceanographer specializing in modeling and observational studies of fjord circulation, in particular, dynamics of its variability over intraseasonal to interannual time scales; influence of the watershed, local meteorology and the external ocean; and its impact on the fjord ecosystem.

Barry C. Kelly
Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans
Toxic Chemicals Division
Sidney B.C. Canada
kellybar@pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca

PBDEs and their hydroxylated (OH-BDE) and methoxylated (MeO-BDE) metabolites in fish and marine mammals (B3)
BSc. Trent University (1992); MSc. Simon Fraser University (1998);
PhD Candidate in the School of Resource and Environmental Management, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia (completion anticipated May 2005)

Jody Kennedy
MRC Coordinator
San Juan County Marine Resources Committee
PO Box 947
Friday Harbor, WA 98250
jody@sjcmrc.org
Tel: (360) 378-1095
URL: www.sjcmrc.org

The San Juan County Marine Stewardship Area: Developing a Marine Management Regime that Recognizes the Social, Cultural, Economic and Ecological Values of County Waters (B9)

Jody is the Coordinator for the San Juan County Marine Resources Committee. In 2003, Jody received an M.P.A. from the Daniel J. Evan’s School of Public Affairs, at the University of Washington, where her studies focused on environmental management and economic based natural resource policies. Jody has a B.S. from St. Lawrence University in New York State and has years of professional experience in membership building, communications, and policy development working for conservation organizations in Colorado and Alaska.

Elizabeth Kilanowski
Raincoast Geo Research
PO Box 2206
Bellingham, WA 98227
kilaruba@copper.net
Tel: (360) 715-3248

Computer Modeling of Marine Waters with Public Domain Software (P4)

Elizabeth Kilanowski has worked as a geologist and presently does computer analysis of geophysical phenomena. She has a BS and MS degree in Geology.


Teri L. King
Washington Sea Grant Program
University of Washington
Shelton, WA
guatemal@u.washington.edu

Tales of a Talking Oyster:  How shoreline owners have rolled up their sleeves to restore private shellfish beds plagued with bacterial contamination in lower Hood Canal.  (C3)

Teri King is a marine water quality specialist with the Washington Sea Grant Program.  She has more than 13 years of experience in shellfish bed restoration and septic system education programming. 

Robin Kirschbaum, PE
Civil/Water Resources Engineer
Herrera Environmental Consultants
2200 6th Avenue
Suite 1100
Seattle, Washington  98121
rkirschbaum@herrerainc.com
Tel: 206- 441-9080
Fax: 206- 441-9108
URL: http://www.herrerainc.com/

The Integration of Natural Drainage in an Urban Subdivision (F5)

Robin Kirschbaum, PE is a civil and water resources engineer with experience in numerous Water-related fields, including innovative stormwater planning for low impact developments; basin planning; flood studies; stream restoration; stormwater management; and advanced hydrologic, hydraulic, and geomorphologic modeling and analysis. 

Laura Klein
Swinomish Tribe
Planning
LaConner, WA
lklein@swinomish.nsn.us

Shellfish population survey of the Swinomish Reservation (P1)

Laura Klein earned a B.S. in Environmental Science with a focus on freshwater ecology and a minor in Biology from Western Washington University. Klein has worked for the program for over two years, as a Water Resource Specialist. Her work has focused on surface and groundwater monitoring and data analysis, as well as, tidelands, nearshore, and shellfish resources monitoring.

Terrie Klinger
Univ of Washington
School of Marine Affairs
Seattle, WA
tklinger@u.washington.edu

Otolith Chemistry Reflects Life-History and Environment of Quillback Rockfish (E5)

Terrie Klinger is Assistant Professor of Marine Affairs at the University of Washington, Chair of the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council, and a member of the San Juan County Marine Resources Committee. Her research focuses on the use of natural science in marine environmental decision-making, with a special focus on the Waters of Washington state.

Christopher P. Konrad
U.S. Geological Survey
Tacoma, WA
cpkonrad@usgs.gov

Monitoring and analysis of sediment transport in the Elwha River (A1)

Dr. Konrad is a research hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey who works on the effects of fluvial processes, including streamflow, ground-water discharge, and sediment transport, on river ecosystems.

Kari Koski
Soundwatch Coordinator/Assistant Research Curator
The Whale Museum
P.O. Box 945
Friday Harbor, WA 98250
soundwatch@whalemuseum.org
Tel: (360)378-4710 ext.33
Fax: (360)378-5790
URL: www.whalemuseum.org

The Evolution of Adaptive Management Practices for Vessel-based Wildlife Viewing in the Boundary Waters of British Columbia and Washington State. From Voluntary Guidelines to Regulations? (E10)

Kari is the Soundwatch Boater Education Program Coordinator and Assistant Curator of Research at The Whale Museum in Friday Harbor Washington. Kari has worked at the museum since 1993 and helped to create the Soundwatch Program. Soundwatch promotes responsible stewardship of the Salish Sea marine wildlife by residents, visitors and commercial users. Using an innovative on-the-water approach, Soundwatch is a model adaptive management program for the development and use of voluntary best practices, public education, vessel monitoring and scientific research.

Pam Krannitz
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada
Delta B.C. Canada
pam.krannitz@ec.gc.ca

Bird use of hedgerows in southwestern British Columbia: effects of hedgerow composition, landscape composition and biogeography across scales (A6)

Pam Krannitz has been working as a Research Scientist with the Canadian Wildlife Service of Environment Canada since 1992. Her training is in plant ecology, so that her research on birds is most concerned with habitat requirements. She is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Forest Science at the University of British Columbia and has graduated 7 MSc students and one Phd student.

Felix C. Kristanovich
Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Sequim, WA
Felix.Kristanovich@pnl.gov

Effects of Climate Variability and Change on Urban Stormwater System: Sensitivity Analysis on Des Moines Creek System at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (P4)

Dr. Kristanovich is a senior engineering hydrologist and water resources engineer with Battelle PNNL. He has 20 years of experience in hydrologic and hydraulic modeling, design, and project management. He is professionally registered as a Civil Engineer in California, Oregon and Washington. He is actively involved in the Seattle Section of American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and the American Water Resources Association (AWRA).

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Ted Labbe
Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe
Natural Resources Dept.
Kingston, WA
tlabbe@pgst.nsn.us

Historical changes to Hood Canal riparian forest landscapes (D6)

Ted Labbe (B.A., M.S. Fishery and Wildlife Biology) is a habitat biologist with the Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe Natural Resource Department. His work integrates historical ecology, remote sensing, and field studies to foster conservation and protection of riparian and coastal ecosystems in the Hood Canal/NE Olympic region of Washington State.

Jessica R. Lacy
U.S. Geological Survey
Coastal and Marine Geology
Santa Cruz CA
jlacy@usgs.gov

The Influence of Eelgrass On Currents And Waves in the Nearshore Region (F4)

Jessie Lacy is an oceanographer with the Coastal and Marine Geology Team of the U.S. Geological Survey in Santa Cruz, CA. She conducts research in hydrodynamics and sediment transport in coastal and estuarine environments, particularly in shallow waters. Jessie earned her Ph.D. in Environmental Fluid Mechanics from Stanford University.

Denise Laflamme
Washington State Dept. of Health
denise.laflamme@doh.wa.gov

Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants and human health (B3)

Denise Laflamme is a Toxicologist with the Office of Environmental Health Assessments, Washington State Department of Health.

Dyanna M. Lambourn
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Marine Mammal Investigations
Tacoma, WA
lambodml@dfw.wa.gov

Causes of Mortality in Pinnipeds of Washington State during 2004 (P1)

Dyanna Lambourn has worked as a biologist for Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Marine Mammal Investigations (WDFW/MMI) since 1993.  She has B.S. in Fisheries/ Marine Resources/ Pre Veterinary Science with a minor in Chemistry from Oregon State University.  She is also a licensed veterinary technician in Washington and Oregon having received a degree at Pierce College in Veterinary Technology.  She is currently working on variety of marine mammal issues including:  marine mammal stranding and response; life history parameters of harbor seals; pinniped/fishery interactions; and several projects funded by Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program (marine mammal health, disease, contaminants and sea bird implantation and anesthesia).

Monique M. Lance
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Tacoma WA
lancemml@dfw.wa.gov

Effects of low dissolved oxygen on harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) diet in Hood Canal (D5)

Monique Lance is a Fish and Wildlife biologist with Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.  Her research in Puget Sound and on the outer coast of Washington for the past 10 years has focused on diet and foraging ecology of seabirds and marine mammals.  Her interests include predator prey relationships and food chain dynamics, marine policy, and ecosystem health.

Owen S. Lange
Environment Canada
Pacific Weather Centre
Vancouver B.C. Canada
owen.lange@ec.gc.ca

Wind patterns in the Georgia Basin – the Salish Sea. (E7)

Obtained BSc from University of Victoria in 1968. Worked as a meteorologist with the weather office in Ontario, Saskatchewan and Newfoundland. Worked with a private weather company from 1976 to 1984 in Scotland, Malta and Bahrain. Joined Environment Canada in 1984 in Vancouver. Worked as a marine meteorologist from 1985 to the present. Wrote; “The Wind Came All Ways” and “Living with Weather” plus prepared the text for the CD-ROM “Coastal weather for BC Mariners”.


William T. Laprade
Vice President
Shannon & Wilson, Inc.
400 N. 34th Street, Suite 100
Seattle, WA 98103
wtl@shanwil.com
Tel: 206-695-6891
Fax: 206-695-6777
URL: www.shannonwilson.com

Seahurst Park: Restoring Nearshore Habitat and Reconnecting Natural Sediment Supply Processes (F7)

Bill Laprade is a licensed engineering geologist who has been practicing since 1973, primarily in western Washington.  His specialties are landslides, glacial stratigraphy, and the interpretation of subsurface conditions from borehole core samples, particularly for large civil works projects. 

Shawn E. Larson
Seattle Aquarium
Research
Seattle, WA
shawn.larson@seattle.gov

Sixgill shark (Hexanchus griseus) conservation ecology project update (E5)

Shawn Larson is the Curator of Conservation Research for The Seattle Aquarium. She holds a doctorate in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences from the University of Washington.

David J. Lawrence
University of Washington
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences
Seattle, WA
djlaw@u.washington.edu

Enumerating phytoplankton abundance in ballast water treatment experiments (P2)

David Lawrence earned a B. S. degree in Biology from Benedictine University and a M.A. in Marine Biology from the Boston University Marine Program. His Masters work was primarily focused on determining the impact of land-derived nutrient loads on estuarine plankton dynamics. He also worked at the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium studying trophic interactions of plankton in the Gulf of Alaska. He currently works at the University of Washington, developing methods to evaluate the effectiveness of ballast water treatment systems on phytoplankton populations.


Cathy Lear
Clallam County
223 E. 4th Street
Port Angeles Washington 98362
clear@co.clallam.wa.us
Tel: 360.417.2361    

Elwha and Glines Canyon dam removals: nearshore restoration and salmon recovery of the central Strait of Juan de Fuca (C4)

Cathy Lear has focused on salmon habitat protection and restoration on the Olympic Peninsula. She is currently Planning Biologist for Clallam County and holds an MA in political theory, a BS in environmental studies, and a BS in journalism.

Kate Leatherbarrow
Graduate Student
Marine Protected Areas Research Group
Department of Geography, University of Victoria
PO Box 3050
Victoria, BC, Canada V8W 3P5
kleather@office.geog.uvic.ca
Tel: 250-721-7345
Fax: 250-721-6216
http://www.geog.uvic.ca/MPARG/index/researchers/kateleatherbarrow.htm

Environmental Impacts of Recreational Boating in the Gulf Islands National Park Reserve of Canada (F2)

Kate completed her bachelor's degree in Biology at the University of Calgary in 2003, during which two semesters of study at Bamfield Marine Station inspired her to move to Victoria to pursue graduate studies related to marine conservation. Kate is especially interested in sensitive habitats like eelgrass beds and the implementation of ongoing monitoring programs to better understand human impacts on these habitats.

Sean LeRoy
Policy Analyst
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
Ottawa, ON
sean.leroy@ceaa-acee.gc.ca
Tel: (613) 957-0596
Fax: (613) 957-0941
URL: http://sdki.nrcan.gc.ca/index_e.php

Traversing the boundaries between science and policy: finding Pathways for place-based community planning (B9)

Sean LeRoy is a provisional member of the Canadian Institute of Planners, and worked as a Planning Analyst with the Pathways Project at Natural Resources Canada.  He is currently working as a policy analyst with the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency in Ottawa.  His Master’s research and subsequent professional activities have focused on the role of communities in government decision-making processes, with a particular interest in natural resource management and coastal zone planning.

Kevin Li
King County Environmental Lab
322 W. Ewing St.
Seattle, WA 98119
Kevin.li@metrokc.gov
Tel: (206) 684-2344
Fax: (206) 684-2395

Successful Relocation of a Seattle Purple Martin Breeding Colony (E9)

I'm currently an Environmental Lab Scientist at the King County Environmental Lab, working on a great variety of field projects. I used to be a Fisheries Biologist with WDFW and the UW School of Fisheries, working on near shore habitat investigations, benthic marine crustaceans and marine food webs. I've been doing volunteer work on purple martins since 1996, trying to build on various purple martin colonies around Seattle, Edmonds, Olympia and beyond.Yan Liang

Yan Liang
Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences
Dept of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist Uni.
Hong Kong Hong Kong China
yliang@hkbu.edu.hk

Distribution patterns of PAHs at Mai Po Marshes Nature Reserve, Hong Kong (B6)

 

Garrett C. Liles
University of Washington
College of Forest Resources
Seattle, WA
gcliles@u.washington.edu

Garrett Liles is a Masters student at University of Washigton in the College of Forest Resources.

The Effects of Riparian Harvesting on Headwater Stream Chemistry and Modeling of Discharge/Nutrient Exports (C1)

 

Sandra Lindstrom
Adjunct Professor
Department of Botany
#3529 – 6270 University Blvd.
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4
sandracl@interchange.ubc.ca
Tel: 604-822-3349
URL: http://www.botany.ubc.ca/people/sandrali.htm

The Biogeography and Molecular Diversity of Mastocarpus papillatus (Rhodophyta, Phyllorphoraceae) in Puget Sound, the Strait of Georgia and the Strait of Juan de Fuca (C2)

Sandra Lindstrom is an adjunct professor at the University of British Columbia studying the biogeography and phylogeny of North Pacific seaweeds. She also consults on their ecology and systematics.  She is a co-author of North Pacific Seaweeds and Keys to the Benthic Marine Algae and Seagrasses of British Columbia, Southeast Alaska, Washington and Oregon and numerous other scientific publications.

Adam Lindquist
Scientific Technician
16018 Mill Creek Boulevard, Mail Stop: TB44
Mill Creek, WA 98012-1296
lindqapl@dfw.wa.gov
Tel: 425-775-1311 ext. 119
Fax: 425-338-1066

Distribution and Abundance of Pacific Herring (Clupea pallasi) Spawn Deposition for Cherry Point Washington stock, 1973-2004. (A4)

Kevin Long
Project Coordinator
North Olympic Salmon Coalition
P.O. Box 699
Port Townsend, WA 98368
nosc@jefferson.wsu.edu
Tel: (360)379-8051
Fax: (360)379-3558
URL: www.nosc.org

Intertidal Forage Fish Spawning Site Investigation for East Jefferson, Northwestern Kitsap, and North Mason Counties (A7)

As Project Coordinator for North Olympic Salmon Coalition Kevin Long coordinates volunteers in activities such as biological monitoring, spawner surveys, and nearshore studies. He oversees project implementation of stream restoration and has worked extensively studying surf smelt and sand lance spawning along E. Jefferson County shores. A “nomadic field biologist” for much of his career, Kevin has ranged from Alaska to Florida studying subjects from fish, to lizards, to birds of prey. A stint as a naturalist/sea kayak guide in the San Juans boosted his familiarity with Puget Sound’s resources and people before he settled in Port Townsend in 2000. His interests include fishing, hiking, and mushroom hunting.

Rachel LovellFord
Swinomish Tribe
Planning
LaConner, WA
rlovellford@swinomish.nsn.us

Nearshore Structure Survey of Swinomish Indian Reservation:  Adapted Procedures and Preliminary Results (P4)

Rachel LovellFord is currently pursuing a degree from Western Washington University in Environmental Science with a minor in Environmental Education and has been working for the Water Resources Program for over two years. LovellFord performs surface and groundwater water quality monitoring, tidelands, nearshore, and shellfish resource monitoring, and data management and analysis.

Betsy Lyons
Marine Conservation Project Manager
The Nature Conservancy of Washington
217 Pine St. Suite 1100
Seattle, WA 98118
Blyons@tnc.org       
Tel: (206) 343-4345 x340
URL: http://nature.org/wherewework/northamerica/states/washington/

Conservation leasing in Washington State-partnerships for improving and protecting state-owned submerged lands (D10)

Betsy Lyons has been with The Nature Conservancy's Washington Field Office since 1999.  She is the project manager for the Conservancy's pilot conservation lease and oyster restoration project at Woodard Bay.  As a member of the External Affairs Team, her work also includes government relations, public policy, public funding, salmon recovery, and a variety of partnership efforts with other agencies and conservation organizations.  Previously she managed a 2-year partnership effort with the Department of Natural Resources to implement nearly a dozen stewardship and restoration projects on state-owned natural areas. Betsy received her Bachelor's degree in botany from the University of Washington and has a Master of Environmental Studies from The Evergreen State College.


M

 

Robie Macdonald
Institute of Ocean Sciences
Sidney, B.C. Canada

A collaborative ambient research and monitoring program in the southern Strait of Georgia (E7)

Robie Macdonald, a geochemical oceanographer with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, has studied organic carbon, freshwater and contaminant pathways in the Arctic and on the North American west coast. Studies have focused on the delivery of contaminants (organochlorines, metals, hydrocarbons, PAH) to oceans and lakes, their transport within these systems and the processes that ultimately remove or recycle them. Recent syntheses have focused on the question of how global change is likely to alter risks from environmental contaminants in the Arctic. The work is published in approximately 130 refereed papers and over 50 technical reports.

Valerie Macdonald
President
Biologica Environmental Services Ltd
5820 Old West Saanich Road
Victoria, BC . Canada V9E 2H1
val@biologica.bc.ca
Tel: 250- 479-3828
Fax: 250- 479-3868

Ecological significance of sediment biotic and geochemical effects related to the Iona WWTP outfall discharge to the Strait of Georgia off Sturgeon Bank (B2)

Valerie Macdonald has been identifying marine invertebrates found in marine benthic monitoring samples for nearly 35 years.  During this time she has promoted improving sample-handling techniques in the field.  She has designed and built a system which provides optimum condition recovery of invertebrates.  This recovery system supports improved taxonomic resolution and provides  consistency and reliability of benthic invertebrate data.  Valerie has trained biologists in taxonomic skills to support environmental monitoring programs.

Andrea J. MacLennan
Western Washington University
Geography, Huxley College of the Environment
Bellingham, WA
amaclennan@comcast.net

An Analysis of Large Woody Debris in two Puget Sound Salt Marshes; Elger Bay, Camano Island, Sullivan Minor Marsh, Padilla Bay (P4)

Andrea MacLennan is an MS candidate in Western Washington University’s Natural Resource Conservation and Management program. She has a unique interdisciplinary understanding of coastal systems through studying and working in the fields of coastal ecology and geomorphology. She currently applies her interdisciplinary background as a coastal scientist with Coastal Geologic Services in Bellingham, Wa.

Simone Magwood
University of British Columbia
2716 West 11th Ave.
Vancouver, British Columbia V6K 2L9
sbmagwoo@hotmail.com
Tel: (604) 435-0442

Drinking water quality and well owner perceptions of quality in a rural watershed in British Columbia, Canada. (B10)

Simone grew up in Ontario and completed her BSc. in Environmental Science at the University of Waterloo in 2000.  After traveling in Eastern Europe and the Middle East for a year she moved to Vancouver to continue her studies at the University of British Columbia.  She completed her MSc. in Resource Management and Environmental Studies in 2004.  She is currently working in Vancouver as an independent consultant.

Lehna K. Malmkvist
Capital Regional District
Environmental Programs
Victoria B.C. Canada
lmalmkvist@crd.bc.ca

Urban Watershed Management Planning: Creating future successes. (B8)

Quick’s Bottom: A case study in wetland restoration. (F10)

Lehna Malmkvist is a vegetation and aquatic ecologist. She has worked extensively with developers and municipalities to implement low impact development techniques and manage fresh water systems, in particular, restoration and stormwater management. She works with the Capital Regional District in Watershed management as the Bowker Creek Initiative Coordinator, as well as consulting with her company, Swell Environmental Consulting.

Brooke Marshall
#608, 105 Keith Road West
North Vancouver, BC V7M 1L1
BAMarsh@shaw.ca
Tel: (604) 986-2445

Spatial assumptions and consultative governance (P5)

Brooke is a professional biologist and recent graduate from the MES Masters Program with a specific focus in planning and environmental decision making.  Prior to beginning the MES program, she worked as an environmental scientist and biologist in the Greater Vancouver Regional District. Her interest in the epistemological approaches to trans-disciplinary theoretical foundations of the disciplines which inform the central disciplines involved in environmental decision making occurred during the process of her Masters degree. 


David Marshall
Fraser Basin Council
Vancouver B.C. Canada
info@fraserbasin.bc.ca

The Fraser Basin Council: Advancing Sustainability in the Georgia Basin Through Collaborative Leadership (C8)

David Marshall, a professional engineer, was appointed Executive Director of the Fraser Basin Council on May 9, 1997. From 1971 until 1997, he worked with the Government of Canada in a wide range of positions associated with environmental protection, assessment and management. As part of these responsibilities, he was actively involved in the development of environmental assessment in Canada. He has conducted and participated in workshops on watershed management, sustainable development and environmental impact assessment in Russia, Thailand, South Korea, Barbados, Jamaica, China, Indonesia and The Philippines. Mr. Marshall is an adjunct professor at Simon Fraser University and in this capacity has taught a Masters course on Environmental and Social Impact Assessment.

Diane Masson
Institute of Ocean Sciences
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Sidney B.C. Canada
massond@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Seasonal water mass analysis for the Straits of Juan de Fuca and Georgia (E7)

Dr Masson has been conducting field surveys in the Strait of Georgia for many years, resulting in an unprecedented data set of water properties for the Straits of Juan de Fuca and Georgia. She has published a series of insightful papers on the ocean circulation and dynamics of the coastal basin and on ocean surface waves. Dr Masson studies of the coastal dynamics and ocean, WAves combine observation, theory and numerical modeling.

Mary Masters
MRC Vice-Chair
San Juan County Marine Resources Committee
P.O. Box 338
Orcas, WA 98280
mmasters@stanfordalumni.org
Tel: (360) 376-5529

The San Juan County Marine Stewardship Area: Developing a Marine Management Regime that Recognizes the Social, Cultural, Economic and Ecological Values of County Waters (B9)

Mary is the Vice-Chair of the San Juan County Marine Resources Committee. She has an M.S. in Civil Engineering and B.A. in Psychology from Stanford University. For over ten years, she worked for the US Environmental Protection Agency managing hazardous waste sites in its Superfund Program and Technical Outreach for Region 9’s Hazardous Substance Research Center. For seven years, Mary managed the Worldwide Remediation Program at Hewlett Packard. Currently, when Mary is not in San Juan County, she is a docent at the Monterey Bay Aquarium and tracks sea otters for the aquarium’s sea otter research and conservation program.

Anna Mathewson
Manager/Policy Coordinator
Burrard Inlet Environmental Action Program (BIEAP)
Fraser River Estuary Management Program (FREMP)
#501-5945 Kathleen Avenue
Burnaby, British Columbia V5H 4J7
amathewson@bieapfremp.org
Tel: 604-775-5755
Fax: 604-775-5198
URL: www.bieapfremp.org

Tools for Managing the Fraser River Estuary (E6)

Anna Mathewson is the Manager and Policy Coordinator of the Burrard Inlet Environmental Action Program (BIEAP) and Fraser River Estuary Management Program (FREMP), intergovernmental partnership programs based in Burnaby, B.C.  She has a Master's degree in Resource & Environmental Management from Simon Fraser University.  Prior to joining BIEAP-FREMP in 2002, she worked for a number of years in the provincial treaty negotiation process including five years as an advisor to the BC Treaty Commission.

Gevan Mattu
Environment Canada
Vancouver B.C. Canada

Toxic Substances Management Strategy and Action Plan for the Georgia Basin (B6)

Gevan Mattu is Senior Compliance Promotion Scientist with Commercial Chemicals Division of Environment Canada in Vancouver. In addition to his work on Georgia Basin Action Programs toxics-related programs he is also involved in Environment Canada’s new substances regulation program and in the development of best management practices to minimize the release of toxics substances from priority industry sectors such as ship and boatyards.

Deanna Matzen
Water Quality Planner/Project Manager I
King County Department of Natural Resources
201 South Jackson Street, Suite 600
Seattle, WA 98104
Deanna.Matzen@metrokc.gov
Tel: 206-263-6326
Fax: 206-296-0192
URL: http://dnr.metrokc.gov/wlr/waterres/streams/FishIndex.htm

Assessing Small Stream Biotic Integrity Using Fish Assemblages Across an Urban Landscape (E5)

Deanna Akre Matzen has a bachelors of science in oceanography and a masters of science in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Washington.  She has been working for King County on the weight-of-evidence component of the Sammamish-Washington Analysis and Modeling Program ecological risk assessment since May 2001.  Deanna also teaches introductory environmental science courses at Puget Sound Christian College in Everett Washington

Christopher W. May
Senior Research Engineer
Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Marine Sciences Laboratory
1529 W Sequim Bay Road
Sequim, WA 98382
christopher.may@pnl.gov
Tel: 360-681-4556
Fax: 360-681-3681
URL: www.pnl.gov/main/sectors/msl.html

A Watershed-based Approach for Developing a Multi-Parameter TMDL In Sinclair- Dyes Inlet, Washington (B10)

Dr. Christopher W. May, senior research scientist and engineer at the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL), is a freshwater ecologist and environmental engineer with expertise in urban watershed assessment and management. His areas of interest include stormwater management, watershed analysis using geographic information systems, salmonid habitat assessment, urban stream rehabilitation Water quality monitoring, stream biological assessment, and watershed restoration. His current research at Battelle focuses on the linkage between upland watersheds and nearshore marine systems, including natural processes and land-use impacts. Prior to joining the MSL team Dr. May was a research engineer at the University of Washington Applied Physics Laboratory. His research there centered on the cumulative impacts of urbanization on native salmonids in small streams in the Puget Sound lowland eco-region. Dr. May is an adjunct faculty member of Western Washington University, Huxley School of Environmental Studies, University of Washington, Tacoma Environmental Science Program, and the University of Washington, Professional Engineering Program.

David E. McCallum
MA Candidate
Marine Protected Areas Research Group
Department of Geography, University of Victoria
PO Box 3050, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P5
davidmcc@uvic.ca
Tel: (250) 882 6387
Fax: (250) 721 6216

Strategies for Use and Protection of the Gulf Islands Marine Environment (D9)

Dave’s background is in marine recreation and tourism and he is presently nearing completion of an MA Geography under the guidance of Dr Rick Rollins.  Dave has spent two field seasons in the Southern Gulf Islands conducting research towards his MA, which is entitled “Strategies for Use and Protection of the Gulf Islands Marine Environment”.  During the summer of 2005, he will work on contract to Parks Canada supervising a research project that will sample resident and visitor usage patterns in the Gulf Islands National Park Reserve.  Outside of academia, Dave is an avid sailor.

Shannon M. McCluskey
University of Washington and NOAA Fisheries
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences
Seattle, WA
ShanMcC@u.washington.edu

Born in Portland, Oregon. BA (Biology major, Environmental Studies minor) Hamilton College, Clinton, New York. Other education: School for Field Studies, Bamfield, B.C., and University of Otago, New Zealand. Work and/or volunteered for: BRD/USGS, Pacific Marine Research, Center for Whale Research, the Whale Museum, National Marine Mammal Lab/NOAA. Currently a 3rd year graduate student at the SAFS, University of Washington and contractor for the NWFSC, NOAA.

Michelle McConnell
Menzies Project
Port Townsend WA
michelle@menziesproject.org

Menzies Project: Funding Ongoing Baseline Data Collection With Sustainable Tourism Revenue (E10)

Menzies Project Program Manager; BS Marine Biology (Oregon State University ‘91); worked in fisheries behavioral research before starting consulting business in ‘94; provides services in community education, resource interpretation, public outreach & involvement, volunteer coordination and project management; involved in place-based stewardship efforts such as Haystack Rock Awareness Program (Cannon Beach, OR), Willapa Alliance - The Nature of Home (South Bend, WA), Northwest Straits Marine Conservation Initiative including both Skagit and Jefferson County Marine Resources Committees.

Lee McCoy
University of Washington
Biology
Seattle, WA
leemccoy@u.washington.edu

Feeding rate, prey preference, and prey size preference of two invasive predatory marine gastropods in Washington State (C5)

Lee McCoy is a relative newcomer to the marine environment, having previously worked on the behavioral ecology of honeybees in the Arizona desert. Despite the appearance of a major shift in trajectory, there is a common thread, with both projects exploring the relationship between competing invasive species. Lee received a B.S. in Zoology from Arizona State University, and is in the process of completing a M.S. in biology from Arizona State University.

David K. McDonald
Seattle Public Utilities
Seattle, WA
david.mcdonald@seattle.gov

Soils for Salmon: Restoring Soil and Watershed Functions with Organics (F1)

David McDonald researches and teaches environmentally-friendly landscape practices for Seattle Public Utilities.  A biologist by training, he has worked in oceanographic research, mountain lion research and forest fire management, operated a small farm, and taught agriculture and forestry with the Peace Corps.  He helped create Seattle’s Backyard Composting and Natural Lawn and Garden programs, and the regional Soils for Salmon initiative.  His publications include articles on soils, stormwater management, and natural landscape design. 

Michael McHenry
Elwha Klallam Tribe
Fisheries Department
Port Angeles WA
mchenry@elwha.nsn.us

Elwha River Restoration-Monitoring the Response of Fisheries and Aquatic Ecosystems at the Watershed Scale (C4)

Employed by the Elwha Klallam Tribe since 1991. Prior employment with the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, Idaho Division of Environmental Quality and the USFS Intermountain Forestry Laboratory. BS Humboldt State University. MS New Mexico State University.

Jeremiah McMahan
Undergraduate Student
University of Washington, Tacoma
9825 Littlerock Rd       
Tumwater, WA 98512
jeremiah_mcmahan@hotmail.com
Tel: (360) 352-6070

The Effect of Heavy Metal Pollution in Aquatic Environments on Metallothionein Production in Mytilus sp. (A10)

Jeremiah McMahan is a student finishing a Bachelors of Science in Environmental Science at the University of Washington, Tacoma.  He is currently employed in the electronics industry and will now look for a career in the science field.  His interests include water analysis, geologic processes and habitat restoration. 

Cathy McPherson
Environmental Scientist
Golder Associates Ltd
195 Pemberton Avenue
North Vancouver, BC. Canada V7P 2R4
cmcpherson@golder.com
Tel: 604-986-4331

Ecological significance of sediment biotic and geochemical effects related to the Iona WWTP outfall discharge to the Strait of Georgia off Sturgeon Bank (B2)

Cathy McPherson is an environmental scientist with over 18 years experience specializing in aquatic toxicology, environmental assessment and monitoring programs. She applies appropriate test protocols to the performance of water and sediment toxicity tests with a wide range of aquatic species, and has conducted numerous monitoring and assessment programs pertaining to wastewater treatment plants, port development, mining, and pulp mills.

Alan J. Mearns, PhD
Senior Staff Scientist
Hazardous Materials Response Division
Office of Response and Restoration
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
7600 Sand Point Way NE
Seattle, WA 98115
Tel: (206) 526-6336
Fax: (206) 526-6329
URL: http://response.restoration.noaa.gov

Declining Chemical Contamination in Puget Sound? Results of the 1999-2003 National Mussel Watch Program (A9)

An Assessment of Alaska Cruise Ship Wastewater Discharges (E10)

Dr. Mearns, Senior Staff Scientist, supports NOAA’s spill response teams around the US. He has a PhD in Fisheries from the University of Washington and has conducted nearly 30 years of research on marine pollution issues in California, Washington and Alaska. Recent projects have included bioremediation, dispersant assessment and assessment of data from the NOAA National Mussel watch program. He received a Department of Commerce Silver Medal for work on the Exxon Valdez oil spill and, WAs alumni of the year at California State University, Long Beach. His areas of expertise include marine ecology, fisheries, biological oceanography and aquatic toxicology.

Stephanie Meyn
B.C. Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection
Surrey B.C. Canada
Stephanie.Meyn@gems1.gov.bc.ca

The British Columbia Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection's Focus on Airshed and Watershed Management Planning in the Georgia Basin. (P5)

Stephanie Meyn is the Air Quality Meteorologist with the Lower Mainland Regional office of the B.C. Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection.

Scott J. Mickelson
King County
Department of Natural Resources
Seattle, WA
scott.mickelson@metrokc.gov

Remediation of PCB-Contaminated Sediment in the Duwamish River Washington (P2)

Scott Mickelson is a Senior Water Quality Project Manager with the King County Marine and Sediment Assessment Group. He focuses on water quality and sediment remediation issues related to King County’s, WAstewater treatment system.

Ian Miller
Surfrider Foundation
Port Angeles WA
imiller@surfrider.org

Using Coastal Monitoring Programs to facilitate Environmental Education and Civic Involvement (C3)

Ian Miller is the Washington Field Coordinator for the Surfrider Foundation, and coordinates the Elwha Shoreline Photographic Monitoring Project. He is involved in the Blue Water Task Force state wide by providing training, fund-raising and technical support to the various monitoring groups.

Brian Missildine
Fish and Wildlife Biologist
US Fish and Wildlife
510 Desmond Dr Suite 102
Lacey, WA 98503
brian_missildine@fws.gov
Tel: 360-753-9561
Fax: 360-753-9008

Polychlorinated Biphenyl Concentrations in Adult Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Returning to Two-Coastal and Two-Puget Sound Hatcheries (A10)

Brian is currently a Fish and Wildlife Biologist with the USFWS and a current graduate of The Evergreen State College in Olympia, WA.  Brian primarily works on endangered species issues and dabbles in environmental toxicology for fun.

Danielle Mitchell
University of Washington
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences
Seattle, WA
mitcheld@u.washington.edu

Long-term changes in population structure and genetic diversity of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) in Puget Sound (C2)

Danielle Mitchell earned a Bachelor’s degree in marine biology from California State University in Long Beach in 2001. After graduation, she worked as a research assistant in a neurobiology lab in San Diego, where she developed a strong interest in molecular biology and genetics. This experience inspired her to combine her knowledge of marine ecology and genetics and is currently pursuing a Master’s degree at the University of Washington under the advisement of Lorenz Hauser.

Karen J.R. Mitchell
Geologist
Swinomish Office of Planning and Community Development
P.O. Box 817
LaConner, WA 98257
kmitchell@swinomish.nsn.us
Tel: 360-466-7280
Fax: 360-466-1615
URL: www.swinomish.org

Nearshore habitat characterization on the Swinomish Reservation (P4)

Ms. Mitchell is a geologist in the Swinomish Tribe’s Planning Office.  She graduated with a BA in geology from the University of Minnesota, Morris, earned a MS in geology from Washington State University, and is currently a Ph.D. student at the University of Washington.  Her research at Swinomish has been focused on nearshore processes and reservation hydrogeology. 

Todd Mitchell
Water Resources Manager
Swinomish Office of Planning and Community Development
P.O. Box 817
LaConner, WA 98257
tmitchell@swinomish.nsn.us
Tel: 360-466-7201
Fax: 360-466-1615
URL: www.swinomish.org

Fornsby Creek Project: Self-regulating tidegates and estuary restoration (P3)

Lone Tree Creek and pocket estuary restoration (P3)

Mr. Mitchell, a Swinomish Tribal Member, is the Water Resources Program Manager in the Swinomish Office of Planning and Community Development.  He graduated from Dartmouth College with a BS in Geology.  He continued his studies at Washington State University and graduated with a MS in Geology specializing in hydrogeology, igneous petrology, and geochemistry.  Mitchell’s research while employed by Swinomish has been focused on the Tribe’s water resources including tidelands, surface water, groundwater, wetlands, and habitat restoration research.

Sarah A. Morley
NOAA
Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Seattle, WA
sarah.morley@noaa.gov

Pre-dam removal monitoring in the Elwha River Basin: establishing baseline conditions for primary and secondary productivity (A1)

Sarah Morley is a research ecologist at NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center. As a member of the Watershed Program, her research focuses on evaluating the effects of different restoration activities on freshwater and estuarine biota. Sarah received her M.S. from the U.W. School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences and her B.S. from U.C. Berkeley.

Steven W. Morrison
Thurston Regional Planning Council
2404 Heritage Court SW #B
Olympia, WA  98502-6031
morriss@trpc.org
Tel: (360) 786-5480
Fax: (360) 754-4413
URL: www.trpc.org

Estuary Feasibility Study for Capitol Lake (C1)

Steven Morrison is Senior Planner with Thurston Regional Planning Council, in Olympia where he has been for the past 22 years. He is a graduate of Huxley College of Environmental Studies in Bellingham, and earned his Masters degree from The Evergreen State College, where he taught in the Masters of Environmental Studies Program for seven years as an Adjunct Faculty. He has focused on shoreline, wetland, and critical areas regulations and is a county alternate to the State Shoreline Hearing Board.

Philip W. Mote
Climate Impacts Group, University of Washington
Joint Institute for the Study of Atm and Oceans
Seattle, WA
philip@atmos.washington.edu

Long-term variability and change in freshwater inputs to Puget Sound (E1)

Dr Philip Mote is a research scientist at the University of Washington, in the Climate Impacts Group (CIG), and an Affiliate Professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences.  A frequent public speaker, he has also written about 40 scientific articles and edited a book on climate  modeling, published in 2000 by Kluwer Academic Press.  In March 2003 he became the Washington State Climatologist.

Martin Mullan
Environment Canada

Georgia Basin - Puget Sound International Airshed Strategy (B5)

Martin Mullan is the Senior Air Quality Planner with Environment Canada’s Vancouver office. He has also worked as an Environmental Specialist with the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs (DIAND) and as an Environmental Officer for the Eastern Caribbean nation of Dominica.  Prior to this experience, Martin worked for a consulting firm on land-use and environmental projects throughout British Columbia.

Thomas F. Mumford
Washington Department of Natural Resources
Olympia, WA
tom.mumford@wadnr.gov

Challenges of Applying Adaptive Management to Restoration of Puget Sound Nearshore Ecosystems: Misconception and Irreversibility (F3)

Dr. Tom Mumford received his BA (Wabash College (1966) and doctorate in botany (University of Washington, 1972). After three years on a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of British Columbia he joined theWashington Department of Natural Resources in 1976. There he researched the cultivation of seaweeds for the production of phycolloids and food, and now works on the biology and management of seaweeds and seagrasses, and the inventory and monitoring of marine/estuarine habitats.

Madrona Murphy
Affiliated researcher
Center for the Study of Coast Salish Environments
P.O. Box 217
Anacortes Washington 98221
madrona@graffiti.net
Tel: (360) 293-6404

Plant communities in a cultural landscape: incorporating aesthetics and historical land use in managing Iceberg Point (Lopez Island, WA) (D1)

Madrona Murphy, a lifelong resident of Lopez Island, has formal training in botany and plant-human interactions, as well as extensive practical experience in the ethobotany of the San Juan archipelago.  She conducted botanical inventories and drafted management plans for publicly owned preserves, with special attention to invasive species and effects of human activities on plant communities.  She currently works at the Center for Cell Dynamics and as an affiliated researcher with the Center for the Study of Coast Salish Environments conducting adaptive management design.

Doug Myers
Puget Sound Action Team
Olympia, WA
dmyers@psat.wa.gov

The Puget Sound Nearshore Ecosystem Restoration Project: An Approach to Restoring Nearshore Ecosystems at a Sound-wide Scale. (F3)

Doug Myers is the wetlands and habitat specialist for the Puget Sound Action Team.  He holds a B.S. in Marine Biology and M.S. in Environmental Science.  Doug has been involved in coastal resource science, policy and management in several states since 1987 and with the Action Team since 1999.  Doug is also the state chair of the Nearshore Science Team of PSNERP.

Mark S. Myers
Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NMFS/NOAA
Environmental Conservation / Ecotoxicology
Seattle, WA
mark.s.myers@noaa.gov

Biomarker and Histopathologic Responses Demonstrate Improvement in Flatfish Health Following Remediation of a PAH-contaminated Site in Eagle Harbor, WA  (P5)

Mark Myers is chief pathologist and leader of the Environmental Conservation Division’s Pathology and Epizootiology research team at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center, where he has worked since 1976. His major research interests are fish and comparative histopathology as a tool to indicate injury to marine biota, epizootiology of infectious and contaminant-associated fish diseases, chemical carcinogenesis and neoplasia in fish, as well as expression of cytochrome P450IA in cellular components of fish and marine mammal tissues and lesions.

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Bruce Nairn
King County
Department of Natural Resources and Parks
Seattle, WA
bruce.nairn@metrokc.gov

An Aquatic Biogeochemical Cycling Model Simulation of Puget Sound, WA (E4)

Bruce Nairn is an Environmental Engineer with King County’s Wastewater Treatment Division. He is interested in understanding and modeling environmental transport processes.

John Nakayama
Senior Oceanographer
Science Applications International Corporation
18706 North Creek Parkway, Suite 110
Bothell, WA 98011
John.S.Nakayama@saic.com
Tel: (425)482-3313
Fax: (425)487-1491
URL: http://www.saic.com/aquatic-sciences/

Effects of a Breach Fill Maintenance Project on Benthic Communities in Half Moon Bay, Westport, WA (D2)

John Nakayama is a senior oceanographer with the Environmental Sciences Division of SAIC.  Since joining SAIC in 1992, he has conducted aquatic environmental investigations related to dredged material characterization, disposal site monitoring, and marine habitat assessment.  Mr. Nakayama received his M.S. degree in Geological Oceanography from the University of Washington in 2003. 

Martha Neuman
Senior Planner II
Snohomish County Department of Public Works
Surface Water Management Division
2731 Wetmore Avenue, Suite 300; Everett, WA 98201-3581
martha.neuman@co.snohomish.wa.us
Tel: 425-388-3464
Fax: 425-388-6455
URL: http://www.co.snohomish.wa.us/Departments/Public_Works/Divisions/SWM/

Science, Policy, and Partners: A case study of the success of salmon recovery planning in the Snohomish River basin (B9)

Martha Neuman is a Senior Planner II with Snohomish County, Department of Public Works Surface Water Management Division. She has led the salmon recovery planning work in the Snohomish River basin for the past four years and has developed and implemented community-based watershed restoration programs for over 10 years. Martha has a M.S. in Land Resources from the Gaylord Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She is a member of the American Planning Association and a boardmember of the Watershed Management Council.

Jenny Newell
University of Washington
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences
Seattle, WA
jenny2@u.washington.edu

Not too hot, not too cold: Behavioral thermoregulation of adult sockeye salmon in Lake Washington (P1)

Jenny Newell is a Masters student at the University of Washington’s School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. She is currently investigating the migration and movement patterns of adult sockeye salmon in Lake Washington.

John Newhook
Greater Vancouver Regional District
Policy and Planning Department
Burnaby B.C. Canada
john.newhook@gvrd.bc.ca

Development of the GVRD's New Air Quality Management Plan (B4)

• Bachelors Degree in Chemical Engineering from McGill University

• Masters Degree in Engineering Science (Environmental) from the University of Western Ontario

John has worked for Union Carbide Canada Ltd. (Montreal); H.A. Simons and Sandwell (Vancouver), designing effluent treatment facilities for the Pulp and Paper Industry; Environment Canada (St. John’s), enforcing pollution control provisions of the Fisheries Act, and the Greater Vancouver Regional District since 1992, currently focusing on development of the GVRD’s new Air Quality Management Plan, and the Georgia Basin-Puget Sound International Airshed Strategy.

Jan A. Newton
University of Washington
Applied Physics Lab
Seattle, WA
newton@ocean.washington.edu

Hypoxia in Hood Canal: status and contributing factors (D5)

Climate related variation in Puget Sound density and oxygen (E2)

Jan Newton, PhD, is a Principal Oceanographer with the University of Washington, Applied Physics Lab and affiliate faculty with the School of Oceanography. A biological oceanographer, she is currently Principal Investigator of the Hood Canal Low Dissolved Oxygen Program’s Integrated Assessment and Modeling Study, formed to assess the impact of human, watershed, ocean, climate, and other factors on dissolved oxygen in the canal. She is also the Coordinator for the regional Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems (NANOOS; see http://www.nanoos.org).

Bryan C. Nielsen
University of Washington
School of Aquatic and Fisheries Science
Seattle, WA
bnielsen@washington.edu

Efficacy of a Hypochlorite Generator and Filtration Treatment System in Preventing the Introduction of Non-indigenous Aquatic Species Found in Ballast Water (P2)

Received Bachelor of Science with emphasis in Aquatic Ecology from The Evergreen State College in June 2000. Worked as an intern with the US EPA in the Region 5 NPDES Programs Branch. Currently a Graduate Student at the University of Washington in the School of Aquatic and Fisheries Science studying ballast water treatment methods.

Barbara J. Nightingale
Washington State Department of Natural Resources
Aquatic Resources Division
Olympia, WA
barbara.nightingale@wadnr.gov

Aquatic habitat Guidelines Project (F9)

Master of Marine Affairs, University of Washington. Environmental Planner Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Aquatic Resources Division.

James Norris
Marine Resources Consultants
Port Townsend WA
jnorris@olympus.net

Menzies Project Scientific Results: 2002-2004 (P6)

James Norris holds a BS degree in mathematics (UC, Davis) and MS and PhD degrees in Fisheries (University of Alaska; University of Washington). He is president of Sound Vessels, Inc., owner of Marine Resources Consultants, and founder of the Menzies Project. From 1991-1999, Dr. Norris was employed as a fishery research consultant at the University of Washington working on salmon harvesting models. His current research focuses on underwater videographic methods for monitoring nearshore marine habitats.

David R. Nysewander
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Wildlife Management
Olympia, WA
nysewdrn@dfw.wa.gov

New insights into the breeding areas, migration routes, staging, molting, and local movements associated with those Surf and White-winged Scoters wintering in the inner marine waters of Washington State (A5)

Dave has been project leader since 1992 for the marine bird component of the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program. He received his B.Sc. in Biology from Principia College in 1965 and his M.Sc. in Wildlife Science from University of Washington in 1977. His experience 1975-1992 in Alaska with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service included monitoring seabird colonies, at-sea surveys of marine birds and mammals, reintroduction of endangered species, and damage assessments related to oil spills.


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Keeley O’Connell
Habitat Restoration Coordinator
People For Puget Sound
407 Main Street Suite 201
Mount Vernon, WA 98273
koconnell@pugetsound.org
Tel: (360) 336-1931
Fax: (360) 336-5422
URL: www.pugetsound.org

Sound Stewards: The Art of Nurturing Our Super-Volunteers (E8)

Keeley O'Connell is the Habitat Restoration Coordinator for People For Puget Sound.  She manages the organization's Spartina Program.  She moved to the northwest in 1999 to pursue her master’s degree in Marine and Estuarine Science at Western Washington University.  Her thesis work researched the effects of invasive Spartina on benthic macroinvertebrates in Willapa Bay, WA.

Michael F. O’Malley
, WAtchable Wildlife Program Manager
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
600 Capital Way N
Olympia, WA 98501-1091
omallmfo@dfw.wa.gov
Tel: 360-902-2377
Fax: 360-902-2162
URL: http://wdfw.wa.gov

Wildlife Viewing Recreation:  Economic Stimulant and Habitat Protection Tool (E10)

Michael F. O’Malley is the Watchable Wildlife Program Coordinator for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and principal author of Wildlife Viewing Activities in Washington:  A Strategic Plan and Report to the Washington Legislature March 2004.  He also wrote the WDFW’s Education Plan.  He serves as chair of the national Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation’s Education Task Force that created the Best Practices in Boating, Fishing and Aquatic Resources Stewardship Education.  In his personal time, he wrote the book Ferry Travel Adventures in Washington, British Columbia and Alaska.                   

Sandra M. O’Neill
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Olympia, WA
oneilsmo@dfw.wa.gov

A mult-species approach to evaluate the presence of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in the Puget Sound food web. (B3)

Elevated levels of persistent organic pollutants in free ranging populations of Puget Sound populations of Pacific salmon: the importance of residency in Puget Sound. (D8)

Ms. O’Neill is a research scientist with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. Washington. She received her B.S. in Zoology from Memorial University of Newfoundland and her M.S. in Zoology from the University of British Columbia.  For the past 15 years she has led the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program’s assessment of contaminants in Puget Sound fishes.  Her research interests are understanding the influence of fish life history on contaminant accumulation and mapping the flow of contaminants through the aquatic food webs.

Paul Olson
National Marine Fisheries Service
Environmental Conservation
Seattle, WA
o.paul.olson@noaa.gov

Monitoring of Restoration Performance in Commencement Bay,  Washington:  Anadromous Fish Presence, Health, and Degree of Chemical Contamination (P3)

O. Paul Olson is a member of the Ecotoxicology group of the National Marine Fisheries Service. He specializes in the histopathology of fish and invertebrates from chemically contaminated marine environments.

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Robert Pacunski
Fish and Wildlife Biologist
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
16018 Mill Creek Blvd.
Mill Creek, WA  98012
pacunrep@dfw.wa.gov
Tel: 425-379-2314
Fax: 425-379-2323

Habitat Characterization and Fish Associations in San Juan Channel (E5)

Bob Pacunski is a Marine Fish Biologist and Research Diver with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife where he has been conducting research on rockfish, lingcod, and other rocky habitat fishes for the past 13 years.  Bob received a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from Seattle Pacific University in 1984, and earned a Master of Science degree in Fisheries from the University of Washington in 1990.  Utilizing SCUBA, GIS, and underwater video and sonar technologies, Bob’s research has focused on understanding the relationships of Puget Sound bottomfish to their habitat, and on the mapping of those habitats throughout Puget Sound. 

Nick A. Page
Raincoast Applied Ecology
Vancouver B.C. Canada
napage@interchange.ubc.ca

Applied Recovery Research on Sand-verbena Moth: A Puget Sound - Georgia Basin Endemic Species (C5)

Nick Page is an ecologist who works on the assessment, restoration, and management of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in coastal BC. He has a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture and a Master’s of Science in Environmental Studies from UBC. His master’s thesis focused on local- and regional-scale patterns of exotic plant species in coastal plant communities in BC. This work led to an assessment project for Environment Canada to examine the distribution and habitat requirements of Sand-verbena Moth which is the focus of this presentation.

Wayne A. Palsson
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Marine Fish Science Unit
Mill Creek WA
palsswap@dfw.wa.gov

Characterization of Demersal Marine Fish Communities in Puget Sound (A4)

GASP! The Response of Marine Fishes to Water with Low Dissolved Oxygen in Southern Hood Canal, Washington (D5)

Wayne Palsson is a Research Scientist for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. He has been studying saltwater fishes in Puget Sound for twenty-five years. After graduating with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Zoology (U.C. Berkeley) in 1977, he earned his Master of Science in Fisheries Science at the University of Washington in 1984. Palsson’s work focuses on groundfish resources in Puget Sound including their assessment, management, and ecology.

Ting Pan
University of British Columbia
6507 Maple St.
Vancouver B.C. Canada
tingpan@interchange.ubc.ca

Sustainable community development from a cultural perspective - A case study of Chinese immigrants in Greater Vancouver (P6)

Ms. Ting Pan holds a bachelors degree in mechanical engineering from Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, China (2001). As an undergraduate student, she was the president of the Environment and Development Student Association of the University (1998-2000). In 2002, she started her masters degree in Resource Management and Environmental Studies at UBC. Her academic interests include sustainable community development and methods to bridge rifts of culture and communication between mainstream society and minority communities.

Anthony J. Paulson
U.S. Geological Survey
Tacoma, WA
apaulson@usgs.gov

Estimated Inputs of Nitrogen to Hood Canal Washington (D5)

Dr. Paulson has held academic, private, and government appointments, where he has conducted aquatic research for more than 30 years. He coupled physical circulation processes with geochemical processes to accurately model and predict metal concentrations in Puget Sound and studied biogeochemical and sediment transport processes in estuaries. He is currently Chief of Environmental Hydrology and Geochemistry for the U.S. Geological Survey. He received his Ph.D. in Environmental Science and Engineering from the University of Washington.

Jeff Pavey
Volunteer Policy Analyst
People For Puget Sound 
911 Western Avenue, Suite 580
Seattle, WA 98104
cjpavey@comcast.net
Tel: (206) 784-5807
URL: http://www.pugetsound.org/

A Brief History of Oil Spill Policy in Washington: Complacency or Vigilance? (C10)

Jeff Pavey is a recent graduate of the Indiana University Graduate School of Public and Environmental Affairs.  While in School, he studied environmental policy and natural resource management and earned his Master of Public Affairs (MPA). Since graduate school, Jeff has completed several policy projects and papers while continuing to look for full time employment.  Jeff moved to Seattle last September and currently volunteers for two local environmental organizations.  

Krista M. Payette
Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection
Surrey B.C. Canada
krista.payette@gems3.gov.bc.ca

Shared Waters: Protecting Water Quality in Boundary Bay and its Smaller Basins, Semiahmoo Bay and Drayton Harbor (P5)

The Shared Waters Roundtable is an international multi-stakeholder working group focused on improving water quality in Boundary Bay, with particular focus on Semiahmoo Bay and Drayton Harbor. Member organizations include the City of Blaine, the City of Surrey, the Corporation of Delta, the Greater Vancouver Regional District, the Fraser Health Authority, the Friends of Semiahmoo Bay, the Little Campbell Watershed Society, the Drayton Harbor Community Oyster Farm, the Drayton Harbor Shellfish Protection District, Environment Canada and the Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection.

Pat Pearson
WSU Jefferson County Extension
Pt. Hadlock WA
pearsonp@wsu.edu

Community Involvement in Eelgrass Protection, Port Townsend Washington (B9)

Two presenters: Pat Pearson and Judy D’Amore Pat Pearson - Masters in Whole System Design, Antioch University, Seattle, Wa. 1992 Bachelor of Science, Dental Hygiene, University of Washington, 1969 Pat Pearson: Faculty, Natural Resource Stewardship Washington State University Jefferson County Extension. Masters in Whole System Design, Antioch University, Seattle, WA. 1992. Bachelor of Science, University of Washington, 1969. Staffs the Jefferson County Marine Resource Committee. Develops Water Watcher Program education and training and surface water education programs. Director of Pollution Prevention Programs, Puget Soundkeeper Alliance. 1994-2002. 2nd Presenter Judy D’Amore: Master of Science Teaching in Biology from the UW. Educator for the Natural History Exhibit of the Pt. Townsend Marine Science Center. Education Coordinator for the strudent monitoring component of the NW Maritimes Center’s Eelgrass Resoration Project.

Cheri Peele
, WA State Dept of Ecology
Olympia, WA
chep461@ecy.wa.gov

Washington State PBDE Chemical Action Plan (B3)

Cheri Peele is a policy analyst at the Washington State Department of Ecology, where she has written chemical action plans for PBDEs and mercury.  Previously, she wrote the Mercury Action Plan for Massachusetts.  Cheri has a Masters in City Planning from MIT.

Jake C. Perrins
University of Washington
School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Seattle, WA
perrins@u.washington.edu

Analysis of ozone and chlorine disinfection byproducts concerning ballast water treatment (P2)

Masters of Science Candidate, University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, 1999-2001.  Analytical environmental chemist throughout the Puget Sound area. 1998 - Bachelor of Science, Environmental Sciences/Microbiology from Northern Arizona University. Professional Memberships: Charter Member of Gamma Beta Phi at Northern Arizona University; Certified Substitute Teacher by the Arizona Department of Education; Member of Pacific Northwest-Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (PNW-SETAC); Member of American Water Resources Association (AWRA)

George R. Pess
NOAA Fisheries - NWFSC
Environmental Conservation Division
Seattle, WA
george.pess@noaa.gov

Predicting salmonid response to the removal of the Elwha River dams (C4)

George Pess works for the NWFSC Watershed program and is a Phd candidate at the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. Mr. Pess has a Masters in Forest Hydrology from Yale University and an A.B. from Bowdoin College in Economics and Environmental Science

Karen L. Peterson
University of Washington
Microbiology
Seattle, WA
karenpet@u.washington.edu

Genetic diversity of Synechococcus in Puget Sound and the Northwest Straits (P1)

Karen L. Peterson is a senior at the University of Washington where she is working toward a Bachelor of Science in Microbiology. She began her cyanobacteria project as a research apprentice at the Friday Harbor Laboratories. She has continued to study and classify Synechococcus clones while working in the laboratory of Gabrielle Rocap, Assistant Professor in the School of Oceanography, University of Washington.

Carol Piening
Washington State Department of Natural Resources
Olympia, Washington

Washington State Department of Natural Resources: Land Manager to Aquatic Steward (E6)

Carol Piening is lead environmental planner for the Washington State Department of Natural Resources’ Aquatic Resources Program’s Endangered Species Act compliance project. She is part of a team that is developing a comprehensive plan for managing state-owned aquatic lands consistently with the Endangered Species Act. She has a Master’s of Science from Michigan State University. She has work experience in aquatic resource management, air quality regulation, and laboratory research.

Linda Pilkey-Jarvis
Prepardness Unit Manager
, WA Dept. of Ecology
PO Box 47600
Olympia, WA 98504
jpil461@ecy.wa.gov
Phone: (360) 407-7447
Fax: (360) 407-7288

Washington State Initiatives for Oil Spill Preparedness (C10)

Linda Pilkey-Jarvis manages the Department of Ecology’s Spill Preparedness Section, which focuses on regional planning efforts, industry spill response plans and conducting drills to test the effectiveness of Washington’s oil spill response system.

Mark D. Plunkett
Seattle Aquarium
Seattle, WA
mark.plunkett@seattle.gov

Seattle Aquarium Citizen Science: Inspiring Marine Conservation in our Local Students (P6)

Mark Plunkett has worked for the past 20 years on marine conservation and education efforts with the Aquarium. Recent efforts include: leading the creation of city and state MPAs on Seattle beaches, partnering with Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program and developing the emerging Citizen Science initiative. He has also taught marine biology and environmental science the past 20 years at Bellevue Community College.

David B. Preikshot
Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia
Vancouver B.C. Canada
d.preikshot@fisheries.ubc.ca

An Examination of Climate and Fisheries Effects Upon Ecosystem Dynamics of the Strait of Georgia Compared to Larger Northeast Pacific Ecosystems (E2)

David Preikshot is a PhD student at the UBC Fisheries Centre, and has worked on fishery/ecosystem models for many places, including South Puget Sound, The Strait of Georgia, The Northeast Pacific Ocean, Iceland, and the Chesapeake Bay. He has also contributed to a variety of other fisheries research projects including energetics of migrating salmon, multivariate assessment techniques and historic analysis of fisheries and catch trends.

Patrick T. Pringle
Research Geologist
Washington Department of Natural Resources
P.O. Box 47007
Olympia, WA 98504
buried_forest@yahoo.com
Tel: 360.902.1433
Fax: 360.902.1785
URL: http://www.dnr.wa.gov/geology/

Buried and submerged forests: keys to the history and impacts of postglacial volcanism and earthquakes on the landscape of the Puget Lowland­A review of geologic literature and recent discoveries (F4)

Pat Pringle, Research Geologist, WADNR Div. of Geology. Pat studies the volcanic processes and history of the Cascade Range and uses radiocarbon dating, tree ring studies, and other techniques to compile recent geologic history, including that of volcanoes, earthquakes, landslides, and debris flows. He is the author of "Roadside Geology of Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument and Vicinity".

Ward Prystay
Jacques Whitford Ltd.

Factors Influencing the Success of Riparian Planting Aspects of Fish Habitat Restoration Projects in the City of Surrey and Recommendations for Future Planting Plan Improvements. (F8)

Mr., WArd Prystay, M.Sc., R.P.Bio., is the Manager of the Environmental Planning & Permitting team in Jacques Whitford Limited’s Vancouver office. He has 12 years experience as an environmental scientist with the past 10 years focusing on aquatic ecology and environmental impact assessment. For stream restoration work, Ward is the lead design professional for Jacques Whitford in BC. His approach to riparian restoration considers the biogeoclimatic zone and seral stages of native forest assemblages.

Brian Pursel
Paladin Data Systems
Poulsbo, Washington

Improved Environmental Data and Project Management Reporting (D4)

Mr. Brian Pursel is Paladin Data Systems lead developer of EKO-System and a highly skilled Information Systems Analyst and Database Application Developer. Mr. Pursel has extensive experience in developing custom applications using Oracle and Microsoft tools in Web-based application development, including broad experience in developing interfaces for applications. He is widely experienced in all aspects of this unique software’s development and maintenance life cycle. Brian holds a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science.

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Stephen R. Quinnell
Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife
Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program
Olympia, WA
quinnsrq@dfw.wa.gov

Use of Acoustic Tagging to Study Home Range and Migration of English Sole (Parophrys Vetulus) in Puget Sound: Application to Management of Contaminated Sediments (P1)

Steve received his B.S. in Fish Biology from the University of Washington, Seattle, WA, in 1978. He has been with theWashington Department of Fish and Wildlife since 1979 working on a variety of projects dealing with the marine resources of Puget Sound. He has been with the agencies PSAMP Fish Component since 1992 and coordinates the project sampling efforts.

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Wolf A. Read
Oregon State University
Oregon Climate Service
Corvallis OR
readw@onid.orst.edu

A Climatology of Windstorms in the Western Pacific Northwest, 1948-2004 (E7)

Wolf Read probably spends too much time at Oregon State University. As a full-time undergraduate, he nevertheless works for the Oregon Climate Service on severe-storm-related research, is a Teaching Assistant in dendrology for the College of Forestry, and is working on a grant-funded research project on wind-tree interactions at the Wind River Experimental Forest. He’s also the father of a 3-year-old girl, Kesri, and husband of a wetlands ecologist, Silven.

Blain R. Reeves
Washington State
Department of Natural Resources
Olympia, WA
blain.reeves@wadnr.gov

Spatial Patterns and Trends of Eelgrass (Zostera marina) at Multiple Scales in Puget Sound: Key Findings from the First Five Years of Long-Term Monitoring (F8)

Blain Reeves is a natural resource scientist with the Nearshore Habitat Program at the Washington State Department of Natural Resources. He has worked on nearshore habitat monitoring, inventory and exotic species research projects throughout Washington for more than eight years. At DNR, he co-manages the Submerged Vegetation Monitoring Project and coordinates other nearshore habitat monitoring and inventory field projects.

Casey Rice
NOAA/Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Mukilteo, WA
casimir.rice@noaa.gov

Spatial, temporal, and length distributions of marked and unmarked juvenile Chinook salmon in nearshore surface waters of Puget Sound (A3)

Relationships Between Marine Bird and Waterfowl Assemblage Composition and Gradients of Human Influence in Nearshore Puget Sound (A6)

Casey Rice is a Research Fisheries Biologist at NOAA’s Mukilteo Field Facility. In fifteen years with NOAA he has been involved in several research programs focusing on the biological effects of human activities in coastal marine and estuarine environments. Casey holds B.A. and B.S. degrees (1989, The Evergreen State College), a M.S. in fisheries (1997, University of Washington), and is currently pursuing a Ph.D. at the University of Washington’s School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences.

Nicole Ricketts
Conservation Education Program Manager
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
600 Capitol Way North
Olympia, WA  98501-1091
rickenlr@dfw.wa.gov
Tel: 360-902-2623
Fax: 360-902-8117

The Effects of Field Science Research Integrated into K-12 Curriculum (C3)

Session Presenter: Nicole Ricketts is the Conservation Education Coordinator for the WA Department of Fish and Wildlife and has been working in Environmental Education for 7 years. Ms. Ricketts educates and informs WA residents on the agency's current strategies for fish, wildlife, and habitat management practices. Recent projects have involved the coordination and development of programs related to Citizen Science and field investigation projects for K-12 education. She is involved in Nat'l programs such as Project WILD and NatureMapping, and is on the board of directors for the Environmental Education Association of Washington.

Mindy Roberts
Environmental Engineer
Washington State Department of Ecology
PO Box 47710
Olympia, WA 98504
mrob461@ecy.wa.gov
Tel: 360-407-6804
Fax: 360-407-6884
URL: www.ecy.wa.gov

Tools for evaluating areas of influence of pollutants within streams and marine waters of South Puget Sound (B7)

Mindy Roberts received a BS in Civil Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, and a masters in Civil and Oceanographic Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.  She is completing her Ph.D. at the University of Washington, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, studying the effects of urbanization on riparian vegetation around Puget Lowland streams.  She has worked on water quality studies at the Department of Ecology since 2000

Rusty J. Rodriguez
U.S. Geological Survey
Seattle, WA
Rusty_Rodriguez@usgs.gov

Life In The Stress Zone: The Role Of Fungal Symbiosis In The Distribution And Survival Of Plants In Puget Sound (C9)

I am a project leader for the U.S. Geological Survey and an affiliate Professor at the University of Washington (Biology) and Montana State Universtiy (Microbiology). My research program focuses on the ecology, genetics and molecular biology of invasive species, inter-species hybrids and plant fungal symbioses.

G. Patrick Romberg
Senior Water Quality Planner
King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks
201 South Jackson St.
Mail Stop, KSC-NR-0600
Seattle, WA 98104-3855
Pat.Romberg@metrokc.gov
Tel: 206/ 296-8251

Recontamination Sources at Three Sediment Caps in Seattle (D2)

Oceanography degree and employed for 25 years at Metro and King County identifying sediment contamination problems in Elliott Bay and the Duwamish River and then promoting sediment cleanup actions.  Heavily involved in planning, implementing and monitoring at 4 sediment cleanup projects; Denny Way CSO Cap, Pier 53 - 55 Cap, Norfolk CSO remediation and Duwamish/Diagonal CSO/SD Cap.  Chaired Sediment Remediation Technical Work Group for over 10 years for the Elliott Bay/Duwamish Restoration Program, which funded 3 sediment cleanup projects.

Peter S. Ross
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Marine Environmental Quality
Sidney B.C. Canada
rosspe@pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Current-use pesticides in coho salmon habitat in the Fraser River System, British Columbia (A9)

Emerging concerns: flame retardants in the marine mammals of Puget Sound and Strait of Georgia (B3)

Adverse health effects of persistent organic pollutants in Puget Sound harbour seals (D8)

Dr Peter S. Ross is a Research Scientist with the Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans. He has published extensively in the area of marine mammal toxicology, and uses marine mammals as sentinels of marine ecosystem health. He is Associate Professor at the University of Victoria and Adjunct Professor at Simon Fraser University.


Don P. Rothaus
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Central Shellfish Unit
Mill Creek WA
rothadpr@dfw.wa.gov

Spatial and Temporal Changes in Pinto Abalone (Haliotis kamtschatkana) Abundance at Ten Index Sites in the San Juan Archipelago (A8)

Don Rothaus is a Biologist and Diving Safety Officer for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. He has worked for WDFW since 1988. He is a member of the agencies Shellfish Dive Team and primarily works on Abalone, Sea Urchin, Sea Cucumber and Geoduck projects. He has also done diving work on small mouth bass relationships to natural and anthropogenic structure in Lake Washington and Lake Whatcom.

Kirsten Rowell
University of Washington
Seattle, WA
rowellk@u.washington.edu

Influences of Geoduck Aquaculture on Eelgrass (P2)

Kirsten Rowell received her BA from Prescott College, MS from Northern Arizona University and is currently finishing her PhD. at the University of Arizona. Her interests range from stream to marine ecology, focusing primarily on conservation issues.

Mindy Rowse
NOAA, NWFSC
Conservation Biology
Seattle, WA
Mindy.Rowse@noaa.gov

Juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawystcha) utilization of estuarine distributary channel and nearshore marine habitats of the Snohomish River Washington. (F1)

Mindy Rowse is a Research Biologist at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center where she currently studies juvenile salmonids in Puget Sound estuaries. She has conducted research on Chinook, sockeye, coho and chum salmon in Washington and Alaska, including analyses on: juvenile and adult migration timing; freshwater and marine productivity; habitat impacts and guidelines for development; scale pattern, age composition, and stock identification; commercial catch and escapement estimation; incidental fishing mortality; limiting factors and life-cycle modeling.

Bert Rubash
Raincoast Geo Research
P.O. Box 2206
Bellingham, WA 98227
kilaruba@copper.net
Tel: 360 715-3248

Computer Modeling of Marine Waters with Public Domain Software (P4)

Bert's formal education is in literature, economics, and physics. He has been modeling physical phenomena for three decades.         


Wendi M. Ruef
University of Washington
School of Oceanography
Seattle, WA
wruef@ocean.washington.edu

In Situ and Remote Monitoring of Water Quality in Puget Sound: the ORCA Time-Series at Pt. Wells (E4)

Wendi Ruef is currently working as an oceanographer at the University of Washington. She has been involved with the ORCA project since June, 2000, and received a bachelor’s of science degree in chemical oceanography from the University of Washington in June, 2000.

Andrea Ryan
#201-401 Burrard Street
Vancouver B.C. Canada
andrea.ryan@ec.gc.ca

Calculation of the CCME Water Quality Index for Selected Rivers in the Georgia Basin (C1)

Andrea has a Masters degree in Soil Science from the University of  British Columbia. She has been with Environment Canada for 15 years  working in water quality monitoring. She has focused most of her time  on the federal-provincial water quality monitoring agreement.

Steve R. Rybolt
Western Washington University - Huxley College
Environmental Studies
Bellingham, WA
srybolt@hotmail.com

Canada-U.S. Convergence in Environmental Regulation:  The Case of Marine Vessel Emissions (B4)

I am currently completing an M.S. in Geography, focusing on Resource Mgt. and Envr. Policy at Huxley College of the Environment, Western Washington University, and hold a B.A. in Economics and Environmental Policy. My current research work includes analyzing management options for marine vessel emissions within the GB/PS and commuting patterns in the North Puget Sound.  I am currently a “long-term” intern at the Northwest Clean Air Agency and a member of the Air and Waste Mngt Association and American-Canadian Studies in the United States. In my spare time I enjoy climbing, skiing, sailing, and teaching.

John L. Ryder
Ducks Unlimited/Canadian Wildlife Service
Northern Conservation Division
Whitehorse YT Canada
john.ryder@ec.gc.ca

A Science-Based Approach to Prioritizing and Conserving Estuary Habitats in British Columbia (F6)

John Ryder is a biologist currently working for Ducks Unlimited Canada/Canadian Wildlife Service in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory. His interests include the application of analytical techniques for assessing species/habitat relationships to be used for conservation planning. John obtained his M.Sc. in Environment and Management from Royal Road’s University in Victoria, B.C. in 2003, and his B.Sc. in Wildlife Management from the University of Alaska-Fairbanks in 1995.

 

S

Eric P. Salathe
University of Washington
Climate Impacts Group
Seattle  WA
salathe@washington.edu
http://www.atmos.washington.edu/~salathe/salathe_cv.html

Climate Model Downscaling for Regional Impacts Studies (E1)

Previous Positions: September 1990 to September 1993: NASA Global Change Research Fellow, Yale University. October 1993 to June 1995: National Research Council Associate, NASA Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres. July 1995 to July 1999: Research Associate, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington. August 1999 to present: Research Scientist, Climate Impacts Group, JISAO/SMA, University of Washington.  Education - 1987: B.A. with Honors, in Physics, Swarthmore College. 1994: Ph.D. in Geology and Geophysics, Yale University (Dissertation Title: The Interaction of Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor and the Earth’s Radiation Field)

David M. Sale
ECO Resource Group
Bainbridge Island WA
daves@ecoresourcegroup.com

Integrating LID with Development Practices (B8)

David Sale is a systems ecologist whose work focuses on integrating environmental planning and protection with community development and management effectiveness. His experience includes oil spill damage assessment, nearshore benthic and intertidal ecology, contaminated sediments evaluation and policy, coordination of multi-agency regional assessment programs, integration of local and traditional knowledge in community-based monitoring programs, and designing and facilitating collaborative natural resource and development partnerships. He is a principal with the ECO Resource Group.


Pamela A. Sanguinetti
U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service
, WA Maritime National Wildlife Refuge Complex
Port Angeles WA
pam_sanguinetti@fws.gov

Planning the Future for San Juan Islands and Protection Island National Wildlife Refuges (P5)

Pam Sanguinetti holds a BS in environmental science - management and policy - from Western Washington University and MA in environmental studies from The Evergreen State College. She has been working for USFWS at the Maritime Refuges for 10 years. Annette de Knijf holds a BS in wildlife biology from Humboldt State University. She has worked for the USFWS Refuge System since 1998 and currently is the deputy project leader at the Washington Maritime Refuges.

Christian P. Sarason
University of Washington
School of Oceanography
Seattle, WA
cbps@ocean.washington.edu

The Puget Sound Modeling System: Methods for nowcasting and forecasting Puget Sound hydrodynamics. (E4)

Christian has developed the nowcast system, building on the development of the Puget Sound hydrodynamical model started by Mitsuhiro Kawase and Bruce Nairn. After graduating from the University of Washington with a Masters in Marine Geophysics, Christian spent 5 years teaching at local community colleges, and is co-founder of the Ocean Inquiry Project (http://www.oceaninquiry.org), a non-profit connecting students, teachers and researchers in the Puget Sound region.

Mike Sato
Director of Education and Involvement
People For Puget Sound
407 Main St. Suite 201
Mount Vernon, WA 98273
msato@pugetsound.org
Tel: (360) 336-1931
Fax: (360) 336-5422
URL: www.pugetsound.org

Marine Shoreline Health as an Integrating Concept for Policy, Education and Public Involvement in Puget Sound (E8)
Mike Sato is Director of Education and Involvement for People For Puget Sound, a citizens' group established in 1991. He has served as communications director, its North Sound director, and staff working on marine resource issues. He has worked in communications for Seattle City Light, the Puget Sound Water Quality Authority, and Hawaiian Electric Industries. He is a graduate of Reed College and author of “The Price of Taming a River: The Duwamish-Green Waterway in Decline.”

Paul Schlenger
Anchor Environmental
Fisheries Biologist
1423 3rd Avenue, Suite 300
Seattle, WA  98101
pschlenger@anchorenv.com
Tel: (206) 287-9130
Fax: (206) 287-9131
URL: www.anchorenv.com

Spatial Relationships between Beneficial and Detrimental Nearshore Habitat Parameters in WRIA 9 and the City of Seattle (B7)

Seahurst Park: Restoring Nearshore Habitat and Reconnecting Natural Sediment Supply Processes (F7)

Paul Schlenger is a fisheries biologist with Anchor Environmental in Seattle. He has over 12 years of professional experience and has led four nearshore habitat assessments in north, central and south Puget Sound. Paul's work has focused on fish habitat restoration in freshwater, estuarine, and marine nearshore environments.

Lynn Schneider
Washington State BEACH Program Coordinator
Washington State Department of Ecology
300 Desmond Dr SE, Lacey
PO Box 47710
Olympia, WA 98504-7710
lsch461@ecy.wa.gov
Tel: (360) 407-6543
Fax: (360) 407-6884
URL: http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/eap/beach/

The Beach Environmental Assessment, Communication, and Health (BEACH) Program: Results and Trends from 2004 (B1)

Lynn Schneider is the BEACH Program Coordinator for the State of Washington. The BEACH Program is a managed jointly by the State Departments of Ecology and Health. Because of the joint management, she splits her time between the two agencies. Ms. Schneider received her B.S. in Environmental Chemistry from the Evergreen State College in Olympia Washington in 1988. She worked as a chemist for Morton International for eight years prior to joining the Washington State Department of Ecology in 2001. Lynn became the BEACH Program Coordinator in 2001. Her main interest is the relationship between increases in indicator levels and increased illness rates associated with water contact and how increased risk is communicated to the public.


Irvin R. Schultz
Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory
MSL
Sequim, WA
ir_schultz@pnl.gov

Environmental Biomarkers and the Health of Ecosystems (F1)

Dr. Schultz received a B.Sc. in Fisheries Science in 1986 from Oregon State University, and a Ph.D. in Toxicology in 1990 from Washington State University.  Post-Doctoral research was performed at Ohio State University and at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory in South Carolina.  Dr. Schultz has been with Battelle Pacific NW National lab since 1996.  Resent studies have focused on endocrine disruption and computational modeling in fish. 

Peter Schwarzhoff
Environment Canada
Vancouver B.C. Canada
peter.schwarzhoff@ec.gc.ca

Puget Sound / Georgia Basin (B5)

Peter Schwarzhoff is the Head of the Atmospheric Science Section for Environment Canada’s Pacific and Yukon Region. This section is charged with ensuring that policy is supported by sound science. Peter is a meteorologist by training and, WAs a weather forecaster for many years before managing the air quality forecast program for the region.

Jacek Scibek
M.Sc. candidate
Department of Earth Sciences
Simon Fraser University
8888 University Drive
Burnaby, BC  V5A 1S6   Canada
dallen@sfu.ca
Tel: 604-291-5429
Fax: 604-291-4198
URL:  http://www.sfu.ca/earth-sciences

Modeled Climate Change Impacts in the Abbotsford-Sumas Aquifer, Central Fraser Lowland of BC, Canada and Washington State, US. (E3)

Jacek Scibek is currently a M.Sc. candidate in the Department of Earth Sciences at Simon Fraser University. Jacek obtained his B.Sc. honours degree in Physical Geography with a minor in Earth Sciences in 2002. His M.Sc. research focuses on modelling the impact of climate change on two aquifers in western Canada; the Grand Forks aquifer in south-central BC and the Abbotsford-Sumas aquifer between BC and Washington State. His project involves aquifer characterization, groundwater flow and transport modelling, and hydrologic modelling.

Ananda Seebach
Western Washington University
Institute of Environmental Toxicology
Bellingham, WA
seebaca@cc.wwu.edu

Regional risk assessment of the Japanese brown alga, Sargassum muticum, in Cherry Point, Washington (P2)

ERA Uncertainty Reduction by Mapping the Nearshore Habitats of Cherry Point Washington, U.S.A. (P3)

I will have a Master of Science in Environmental Science from WWU in March 2005. My emphasis is in Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) and Toxicology. I have experience developing ecological RAs and RA computer programs and models. I utilize GIS software and conduct remote sensing to identify, quantify and map critical habitats, and to reduce uncertainty and refine risk predictions. I have given much attention to watershed, estuarine and coastal habitats, and to invasive species.

James R. Selleck III
Western Washington University
Biology: Marine and Estuarine Science Program
Mill Creek WA
sellejrs@dfw.wa.gov

Comparative Reproductive Events Of The Invasive Varnish Clam, nuttallia obscurata, And The Fisheries Littleneck Clam, venerupis philippinarum (C9)

B.S. in Biology: Marine and Freshwater option, University of New Hampshire. M.S. in Biology: Marine and Estuarine Science Program, Western Washington University (advisor Deb Donovan). Currently employed as a Biologist with the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife, Marine Groundfish Management Division.

J. Anne Shaffer
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
332 E. 5th Street
Port Angeles Washington 98362
shaffjas@dfw.wa.gov
Tel: 360.457.2634
Fax: 360.417.3302

Elwha and Glines Canyon dam removals: nearshore restoration and salmon recovery of the central Strait of Juan de Fuca (C4)

Anne Shaffer is a marine habitat biologist with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. Her work over the last sixteen years has focused on  nearshore: upland interactions, as well as ecosystem management and applied research of  nearshore habitats. She is a co-founder and member of the Elwha nearshore consortium, a working group dedicated to promoting local and regional dialog focused on defining and understanding nearshore habitat restoration opportunities associated with the Elwha dam removals. Ms. Shaffer holds a Master’s degree from Moss Landing Marine Laboratory.

Vivek Shandas
PhD Candidate
University of Washington
410 Gould Hall, Box 355740
Seattle, WA 98195-5740
chickade@u.washington.edu
Tel: 206.334.9697
Fax: 206.685.9597

Towards an Integrated Approach to Watershed Planning: The role of land cover, human preference, and biotic condition in managing Puget Sound lowland streams. (E6)

Vivek Shandas is completing his PhD from the Department of Urban Design and Planning at the University of Washington (June 2005).  His research addresses the relation between scientific information and environmental policy within urbanizing areas of the United States.  Vivek’s dissertation integrates preference analysis with biophysical conditions of Puget Sound lowland watersheds by examining the impact of vegetation patterns on aquatic conditions.  He has previous degrees in biology, environmental management and policy, and economics.  In the Fall of 2005 he will be joining the faculty at Portland State University’s College of Urban and Public Affairs. 

Jim Shannon
Fish Biologist
Taylor Associates, Inc.
7104 Greenwood Avenue North
Seattle, WA 98103
jim@taylorassoc.net
Tel: 206-267-1409
Fax: 206-267-1401
URL: www.taylorassoc.net

Observations of Coded Wire Tag Juvenile Chinook Salmon Captured in the Duwamish River and Elliott Bay Washington (A3)

Jim is originally from the east coast where he received his BS in Business and economics in 1990 from The University of Delaware.  After he graduated he moved to Seattle and became interested in salmon and their history in the Pacific Northwest.  He changed careers several times (before realizing he was more comfortable in waders than a business suit) and returned to academia where he received his MS in Biology from Central Washington University in 1997.  He has been employed with Taylor Associates, Inc. for four years and has worked on a variety of projects ranging from bull trout presence/absence surveys to writing ESA documents.  His professional interests include marine forage fish ecology, salmonid physiology, principles of electrofishing and anything to do with bull trout.


Patrick Shaw
Environment Canada
Vancouver B.C. Canada
pat.shaw@ec.gc.ca

Modelling Loadings and Fate of PCBs and PBDEs in the Georgia Basin (P2)

Pat Shaw is a project scientist in the Aquatic and Atmospheric Science Division of Environment Canada in Vancouver. His recent past work has focussed on long-range transport and fate of POPs and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in southwest British Columbia.

Hugh Shipman
, WA Department of Ecology
Shorelands Program
Bellevue, WA
hshi461@ecy.wa.gov

Developing a Geomorphic Typology to Guide Regional Shoreline Restoration Planning on Puget Sound (F6)

Hugh Shipman has been a coastal geologist with the Washington Department of Ecology since 1989. He provides technical guidance to state and local agencies and conducts educational programs for shoreline officials and property owners. His interests include natural hazards, coastal processes, beach restoration, and the environmental impacts of shoreline modification. Hugh received his B.A. in Earth Sciences and Engineering from Dartmouth in 1981 and his M.S. in Geological Sciences from the U.W. in 1986.

Suzanne Shull
Washington State Department of Ecology
Padilla Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve
Mount Vernon WA
sshull@padillabay.gov

Characterizing Existing Hydrology Water Quality, and Other Characteristics of a Small Pacific Coast Watershed in Preparation for Habitat Restoration Alternatives (P3)

Suzanne Shull is the GIS Specialist at the Padilla Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve Washington State Department of Ecology, in Mount Vernon Washington.  She received her B.S. degree in Urban Studies and Environmental Management from the University of California, San Diego, and her M.S. degree in Environmental Science from Huxley College, Western Washington University, in Bellingham, Washington.

Heidi A. Siegelbaum
Siegelbaum & Associates
Seattle, WA
, WAstenot@speakeasy.net

Data Needs a Date: Transforming the Complexity of Science to Ecosystem Change in the Puget Sound Georgia Basin (C7)

Having practiced law for 8 years, Heidi focuses on providing concise tools for businesses and communities to improve environmental management, bridging the ostensible divide between the economy and the environment. She is an advocate of using cross-disciplinary approaches, including humor, to change the way people think about natural systems and science. She currently manages the Puget Sound Georgia Basin Ecosystem Indicators Workgroup as well as the Sound Tourism program for People For Puget Sound.

Charles A. Simenstad
University of Washington
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences
Seattle, WA
simenstd@u.washington.edu

Conceptualizing Restoration of Nearshore Ecosystem Processes (F3)

Charles A. (“Si”) Simenstad, Research Associate Professor at the University of Washington’s School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (SAFS), is an estuarine and coastal marine ecologist and Coordinator of the Wetland Ecosystem Team (WET). His research concerns primarily natural estuarine/coastal marine ecosystem-, community- and habitat-level interactions; predator-prey relationships; organization of food webs; landscape ecology and restoration. He holds a B.S. (1969) and M.S. (1971) from the School of Fisheries at the University of Washington.

Jim Simmonds
King County
Department of Natural Resources and Parks
Seattle, WA
jim.simmonds@metrokc.gov

Brightwater Marine Outfall: Overview of Status and Potential for Impacts to Puget Sound (B1)

Robert Simmons
Washington State University Mason Co. Extension
Shelton, WA
simmons@wsu.edu

Hood Canal Watershed Pledge (D6)

Robert Simmons is a Water Resources Agent with Washington State University Extension. Over the past 11 years he has developed numerous community education and involvement programs related to water resource protection, in the Mason and Thurston County area. Bob is also the director of the WSU Mason County Extension office. He holds a Master’s degree from the University of Rhode Island in Water Resources Management and a Bachelor’s Degree in Geo-mechanical Engineering from the University of Rochester.


Abigail Sine
Summer Research Assistant
The SeaDoc Society
UC Davis Wildlife Health Center – Orcas Island Office
1016 Deer Harbor Road
Eastsound, WA 98245
Tel: (360) 376-3910
Fax: (360) 376-3909
URL: www.seadocsociety.org

Volunteer fish and invertebrate surveys: what makes recreational SCUBA divers want to participate? (E8)

Abby Sine is a recent graduate of the University of Washington. She enjoys SCUBA diving, black & white photography, and hanging out with animals. She is currently gaining experience in veterinary medicine and has plans to go to veterinary school.

Gary L. Slater
Ecostudies Institute
Mount Vernon WA
glslater@ecoinst.org

Shorebird habitat use during fall and spring migration in the Greater Skagit-Stillaguamish Delta (E9)

Gary Slater is the Research Director of Ecostudies Institute, a non-profit organization committed to research and conservation. For the last eight years, Gary has developed, implemented, and managed several avian research programs  in the northwest and southern Florida.  Besides his research interest in waterbird use of estuarine habitats, Gary’s is assessing the feasibility of reintroducing the oak-obligate White-breasted Nuthatch into the Puget Lowlands.  In Florida, Gary’s research efforts include the reintroduction of Eastern Bluebirds and Brown-headed Nuthatches into Everglades National Park and the ecological effects of fire on the pine rockland avifauna in southern Florida.

Doris J. Small
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Port Orchard WA
smalldjs@dfw.wa.gov

Marine Shoreline Armoring in Puget Sound and the Washington State Hydraulic Code (P5)

Doris works with WDFW as a habitat biologist / watershed steward involved in salmon recovery planning and habitat restoration in Hood Canal and Kitsap Peninsula. She has been with the Habitat Program of WDF/WDFW for 17 years.


Ione M. Smith
University of British Columbia
Resource Management and Environmental Studies
Vancouver B.C. Canada
ione@interchange.ubc.ca

Cumulative Effects of Agriculture on Water Quality in the Transboundary Sumas River Watershed (B10)

Ione Smith completed this research as part of her M.Sc. in Resource Management and Environmental Studies at the University of British Columbia. She has a B.Sc. in Environmental Sciences from the University of Guelph, Ontario, and is currently completing her certification as a Professional Agrologist. She is primarily interested in the effects of land use planning on soil and water quality, as well as transboundary watershed management issues.

Kaia Smith
Swinomish Tribe
LoConner, Washington

Lone Tree Creek and pocket estuary restoration (P3)

Kaia Smith is an Environmental Educator with the Swinomish Water Resources Program in the Swinomish Planning Office. Smith is responsible for carrying out the Tox-in-a-Box program, an educational toolkit used to educate grades K-12 about toxics in the environment. Smith has been trained by University of Washington, School of Public Health outreach coordinators and is currently enrolled at Skagit Valley College. Additionally, Smith performs surface and groundwater water quality monitoring.

Risa B. Smith
Environment Canada
Pacific and Yukon Region and Biodiversity Convention Office
Vancouver B.C. Canada
risa.smith@ec.gc.ca

Canadian Biodiversity Index - First Results of Proof of Concept Testing (C7)

Risa Smith been involved in the development of environmental indicators for the past 15 years, currently with Environment Canada and previously with the Province of British Columbia. She has led the development of several comprehensive reports at the provincial, national and international levels and is currently involved in the development of global biodiversity indicators as well as aggregateindices that summarize complex ecological issues in a way that isunderstandable to a non-technical policy audience.


Cameron Snow
Independent Video Producer
10147 NE Kitsap Street
Bainbridge Island, WA 98110
snowcc@bainbridge.net
Tel: (206) 780-9230

Return of the Plankton: The Seasons Underwater in Puget Sound (PDVD)

Cameron Snow, video producer, environmental focus, visual artist, MA, Royal College of Art, London, BA in biological sciences, Mills College, California.

John Southard
Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory
Sequim, WA
john.southard@pnl.gov

Improving the success of eelgrass (Zostera marina) restoration in the Pacific Northwest by using the three P's: Planning, Planting, and Performance (F8)

John Southard is a fisheries biologist and the Dive Safety Officer in the Coastal Assessment and Restoration group at PNNL’s Marine Sciences Laboratory. He has a strong background in fisheries, wildlife, ecology, and environmental policy and assessment. Mr. Southard is also an Emeritus SCUBA instructor with the National Association of Underwater Instructors (NAUI) and Technical Diving International (TDI), certified to teach mixed-gas diving to depths of 300 feet.

Peg Staeheli, ASLA
Principal
SvR Design Company
815 Western Avenue, Suite 400
Seattle, WA  98104
pegs@svrdesign.com
Tel: 206-223-0326
Fax: 206-223-0125
URL: www.svrdesign.com

The Integration of Natural Drainage in an Urban Subdivision (F5)

Peg Staeheli, ASLA is a founding principal of SvR Design Company, a Seattle design firm engaged in the practices of landscape architecture, civil engineering and environmental restoration.  She takes a systems approach to design, integrating aesthetics, function and ecological benefit into urban environments.  Peg has worked to bring natural drainage systems design into day to day project work.


Stephen J. Stanley
Washington Department of Ecology
Shorelines and Environmental Assistance
Bellevue, WA
ssta461@ecy.wa.gov

Incorporating Landscape Principles into Land Use Plans (F6)

Mr. Stanley received a BA in environmental studies and a BS in Aquatic Biology from UC Santa Barbara. For the past 27 years he has focused on coastal and watershed planning in California and Washington including working with the California Coastal Commission, his own environmental consulting firm, City of Everett, and Sheldon and Associates. For the past 8 years at the Department of Ecology, Mr. Stanley has assisted in the drafting of wetland assessment methods (Washington State Wetland Function Assessment Project - Columbia Basin) and landscape assessment tools designed to guide local governments in their shoreline (SMP) and comprehensive planning efforts (GMA).

Jodi Stark
Marine Campaign Coordinator
Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - British Columbia Chapter
555 West Georgia St, suite 601
Vancouver, BC V6B 1Z6
jstark@cpawsbc.org
Tel: (604) 685-7445
Fax: (604) 685-6449
URL: www.cpawsbc.org

Say Hello to Big Eddy: A global model for international cooperation for ecosystem-based oceans management and MPA development (D9)

Jodi Stark is working at CPAWS as the Marine Campaign Coordinator. She has a master’s degree in Resource and Environmental Management from Simon Fraser University, where her research project focused on comparing the implementation of marine protected areas policy under Canada’s Oceans Act and Australia’s Oceans Policy. Her graduate studies is backed by a Bachelor’s degree in Environmental Biology from McGill University and by involvement in various local and international conservation projects including a yellow-eyed penguin nesting survey in New Zealand, a cloud forest restoration project in Costa Rica and a trail and habitat restoration project in North Vancouver.

Carla Stehr
NOAA, NMFS
Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Seattle, WA
carla.m.stehr@noaa.gov

Forestry herbicide effects on zebrafish early development. (P2)

Carla Stehr is a Research Fisheries Biologist at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center. She has been with NMFS since 1976. She has a BA from Evergreen State College, and an MS from the University of Washington. She is presently involved in studies of toxicant exposure on fish development, using zebrafish as a model system.

John Stein
Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Seattle, Washington

The West Coast Center for Oceans and Human Health (P2)

The Northwest Fisheries Science Center conducts research to help conserve and manage living marine resources and their habitats in the Pacific Northwest. It is one of six NOAA Fisheries science centers in the nation. The Center’s research assists resource managers in making sound decisions that build sustainable fisheries, recover endangered and threatened species, sustain healthy ecosystems, and reduce human health risks.

Scott Steltzner
Squaxin Island Tribe
Shelton, WA
ssteltzner@squaxin.nsn.us

Movement and survival of acoustically tagged coho salmon smolts in south Puget Sound (P1)

Scott Steltzner is a research fisheries biologist with the Squaxin Island Tribes Natural Resource Department located in Shelton Washington. Current work centers on juvenile salmonid use of the marine nearshore in South Puget Sound where projects include beach seaining and acoustic tracking of coho smolts. Experiences and interest include research on habitat utilization and survival of salmon in freshwater environments.

Kim A. Stephens
BC Inter-Governmental Partnership
West Vancouver B.C. Canada
kimastephens@shaw.ca

The Water Balance Model for British Columbia: A Web-Accessible Tool for ìGreenî Subdivision Design (B7)

Kim Stephens, Engineer-Planner, has received international recognition for his pioneering efforts related to watershed-based rainwater management, water conservation and smart landscape development. He has been invited to speak on “the British Columbia experience” and make keynote presentations at forums in Australia and throughout North America. The guidance document titled “Stormwater Planning: A Guidebook for British Columbia” is a distillation of his 30 years of experience in water resource management. Kim also created the vision for the Water Balance Model for British Columbia as an extension of the Guidebook.

Jeffrey H. Stern
King County Natural Resources and Parks
Seattle, WA
jeff.stern@metrokc.gov

Dredging residuals happen - anticipation and management of residuals are key to successful sediment remediation projects. (D2)

Jeff has over 20 years of experience in Puget Sound working on fate and effects of environmental contaminants and the cleanup of contaminated sites. He is a panel member of the Elliott Bay Duwamish Restoration Program and is working on the Lower Duwamish Superfund cleanup. Jeff worked previously with the Puget Sound Water Quality Authority on contaminated sediments, the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program and stormwater. He currently works with King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks to address the County’s contaminated sediment issues. Jeff received degrees in Oceanography and Zoology from the University of Washington in 1983.

Chantal Stevens
Sustainable Seattle
Seattle, WA
chantal@sustainableseattle.org

Measuring what matters - sustainability indicators and the participatory process (C7)

Chantal Stevens is the executive director of Sustainable Seattle. She has worked in natural resource management and on environmental issues since 1984, with state agencies and the private sector, as Environmental Division Manager for the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe between 1991 and 1999, and as Executive Director of People for Salmon. She holds a Master’s degree in Marine Affairs from the University of Washington.

Naki Stevens
Director of Programs
People for Puget Sound
Olympia, WA 98501
1063 Capitol Way South, Suite 206
nstevens@pugetsound.org
Tel: (360) 754-9177
Fax: (360) 534-9371
URL: http://www.pugetsound.org

A Brief History of Oil Spill Policy in Washington: Complacency or Vigilance? (C10)

Naki Stevens, Director of Programs, was People For Puget Sound’s first Policy Director and returned to People For Puget Sound in January 2004, after having served as executive director of Restore America’s Estuaries and then conservation director of Audubon Washington.  She served on the planning staff of the Puget Sound Water Quality Authority from 1985 to 1990. She holds a BA in environmental studies from Johnson State University (Vermont) and a Master’s in Urban Planning from the University of Washington. She has just been appointed by Governor Locke to a four-year term on the Puget Sound Council and a three-year term on the Washington Biodiversity Council.


Kurt Stick
Biologist
Washington Dept. of Fish & Wildlife
P.O. Box 1100
La Conner WA 98257
stickkcs@dfw.wa.gov
Tel: 360-466-4345 ext. 243
Fax: 360-466-0515

Distribution and Abundance of Pacific Herring (Clupea pallasi) Spawn Deposition for Cherry Point Washington stock, 1973-2004. (A4)

Biologist with WDFW since 1986.  Project lead for Herring Stock Assessment Project since 1998.  Received B.S. in Fisheries Science (1980) University of Washington.

Kenneth M. Stone
, WA State Dept. of Transportation
Environmental Services Office
Olympia, WA
stonek@wsdot.wa.gov

Stormwater Research Needs Identified in Conjunction with Updating WSDOT's Highway Runoff Manual (B2)

Kenneth M. Stone is Resource Programs Branch Manager in the Environmental Services Office Washington State Department of Transportation. The Resource Programs Branch includes programs in hazardous materials; stormwater management; water quality; air quality, energy and traffic noise; watershed management; and cultural resources. Mr. Stone holds a B.A. in Physical Geography from the State University of New York at Buffalo, and a certificate in Environmental Management from the University of Washington. Mr. Stone has 25 years of experience in the environmental field, including positions with Dames & Moore, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, and the Washington Department of Ecology.

Kristina M. Straus
University of Washington
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences
Seattle, WA
kmstraus@u.washington.edu

Restoration Aquaculture of the Pinto Abalone (Haliotis kamtschatkana) (A8)

Kristi Straus attended Colby College in Waterville, Maine where she received her B.A. in Biology. She is currently doing graduate work under Dr. Carolyn Friedman at the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. Her Masters thesis project focuses on the restoration aquaculture and phylogeography of the pinto abalone (Haliotis kamtschatkana). Before beginning graduate work, Kristi was a Peace Corps volunteer teaching health education and working to improve access to high quality water in a village in Morocco.

Erika Stroebel
Whatcom County Public Works
Water Resources Division
Bellingham, WA
EStroebe@co.whatcom.wa.us

Getting to Healthy Shellfish Beds Through Community Connections (E8)

Erika Stroebel is a Senior Planner with Whatcom County Public Works-Water Resources Division. She has a MS in Applied Ecology and Conservation Biology from Frostburg State University in Maryland. For the past five years, Erika has been the lead staff for the Whatcom County Marine Resources Committee.

Jason G. Su
The University of British Columbia
The Department of Geography
Vancouver B.C. Canada
jasonsu@geog.ubc.ca

Developing a Geomatics Protocol for Urban Air Pollution Sampling Based on a Range of Input Data (B4)

Ph.D. 2000-2003, University of Alberta. Remote Sensing of Rangeland Management; 2004 - date, University of British Columbia. Health Canada/BC CDC Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Stephanie Sylvestre
Environmental Conservation Branch
Vancouver B.C. Canada
stephanie.sylvestre@ec.gc.ca

Biological Stream Assessment at Federal-Provincial Water Quality Stations in the Georgia Basin (C1)

Stephanie has an MSc in Zoology from the University of Western Ontario and has been working on biological stream assessments using benthic invertebrates for 10 years, 8 of those with Environment Canada. She has worked with Environment Canada developing sediment quality guidelines in Ottawa and also participates in sediment and water contaminant studies in BC.

Anne C. Symonds
Penhallegon Associates Consulting Engineers
Seattle, WA
annes@paceengrs.com

Reducing Combined Sewer Overflows at Denny Way (B1)

Anne Symonds is a Civil Engineer in Seattle.  A graduate of the University of Washington with a BSCE and MSCE, she founded her own enginering firm in 1980.  Since 2001 she has worked for Penhallegon Associates Consulting Engineers.  Ms. Symonds has worked on the Denny Way project since the 1988 CSO studies, and is currently assisting the Construction Management team in completing the project.


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Maki Tabuchi
University of Victoria, Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Victoria BC Canada

Adverse health effects of persistent organic pollutants in Puget Sound harbour seals (D8)

Maki Tabuchi is currently working on her MSC degree in the field of wildlife toxicology. She obtained her BSC degree in agricultural chemistry at Tamagawa University in Tokyo, Japan and a BS degree from Florida State University in Tallahassee FL, US.

Tracy Tackett, PE
Senior Civil Engineer
Seattle Public Utilities
700 Fifth Avenue
PO Box 34018
Seattle, WA 98124-4018
tracy.tackett@seattle.gov
Tel: 206-386-0052
Fax: 206-233-1532
URL: http://seattle.gov/util

Evolution of Seattle Public Utilities' Natural Drainage System Projects (B8)

Tracy Tackett, PE is stormwater design engineer for Seattle Public Utilities.   Tracy received her Masters in Civil Engineer from the University of Washington.  She is the design lead for the City of Seattle's Natural Drainage System Program, which focuses on the use of naturalistic design alternatives for achieving detention and water quality goals. 

Renee K. Takesue
USGS
Coastal & Marine Geology
Santa Cruz CA
rtakesue@usgs.gov

Sedimentation and contaminant loading: impacts on eelgrass (Zostera marina) bed health in northern Puget Sound (D2)

Renee Takesue is a geochemist with the Western Coastal & Marine Geology Team of the U.S. Geological Survey. Her research uses trace metals and stable isotopes in water, sediments, and biota to understand modern ecosystem processes, and as tools for paleo-environmental and paleo-climate reconstructions. Renee received her B.S. from Humboldt State University (1995, geological oceanography) and her Ph.D. from Columbia University (2002, chemical oceanography).

Sonia Talwar
Geographer
Geological Survey of Canada
Natural Resources Canada
101-605 Robson Street
Vancouver, BC V6B 5J3
Sonia.Talwar@nrcan.gc.ca
Tel: 604-666-1131
Fax: 604-666-1124
URL: http://sdki.nrcan.gc.ca/index_e.php

Traversing the boundaries between science and policy: finding Pathways for place-based community planning (B9)

Sonia Talwar is a socio-technical geographer with Natural Resources Canada.   She is keenly interested in the role of information in the relationships between science, technology and society. Her work focuses on public participation geographic information systems, science communication, and the design and use of technical systems to support public engagement with diverse forms of knowledge.  In her current projects, she is committed to designing processes and activities that encourage collaboration across jurisdictional and disciplinary boundaries. 

Curtis Tanner
Puget Sound Nearshore Ecosystem Restoration Projec
US Fish and Wildlife Service
Olympia, WA
Curtis_tanner@fws.gov

The Puget Sound Nearshore Ecosystem Restoration Project: An Approach to Restoring Nearshore Ecosystems at a Sound-wide Scale. (F3)

Curtis is a Restoration Ecologist within the Puget Sound Program of US Fish and Wildlife Service.  He has participated in the design, monitoring and management of many restoration projects throughout the sound.  Curtis has been a member of the Nearshore Science Team since its inception, and delivered dozens of presentations to the restoration community as part of PSNERP’s implementation team.  In 2003, he became the project manager for PSNERP representing the state of Washington.

Kathy Taylor
Local Liaison—Pierce and King counties
Puget Sound Action Team
PO Box 40900
Olympia, WA  98504-0900
ktaylor@psat.wa.gov
Tel: 253-333-4920
Fax: 253-333-4920

Educating Shoreline Landowners: Examples from King, Whatcom, Kitsap, Jefferson, Mason and Pierce Counties: A Perspective on Approaches and Effectiveness in eliciting on-the-ground change. (F9)

Kathy Taylor, Hilary Culverwell and John Cambalik are Local Liaisons for the Puget Sound Action Team. In this capacity, they are responsible for identifying opportunities at the local level to help protect and preserve Puget Sound and implement the Puget Sound Management Plan. Kathy Taylor (King and Pierce Counties) earned her B.S. and M.S. in Biology from Western Washington University and her Ph.D. in Wetland Ecology from Louisiana State University. Hilary Culverwell (Skagit, Whatcom and San Juan Counties) has a B.A. in Political Science from Occidental College, and a Master of Public Affairs (M.P.A.) and an M.S. in Environmental Science from Indiana University.  John Cambalik (Clallam, Jefferson and Kitsap counties) holds a B.S. in Fisheries Biology from the State University of New York, Syracuse and an M.S. in Marine Science from North Carolina State University.

Thomas W. Therriault
Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Nanaimo B.C. Canada
therriaultt@pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Interpreting nearshore fish community dynamics from Strait of Georgia juvenile herring surveys (A4)

Identifying and separating impacts of climate change and seal predation on the distribution and abundance of herring in the Strait of Georgia (E2)

Dr. Therriault is a pelagic research scientist with the Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans working at the Pacific Biological Station in Nanaimo, BC. During Postdoctoral research he applied molecular markers to invasion biology. Current research is focused on two major themes: a) understanding temporal and spatial patterns of nearshore fish communities; and b) quantifying population dynamics of northern BC herring stocks with an emphasis on growth, fecundity and ecosystem interactions.

Ronald M. Thom
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Marine Sciences Laboratory
Sequim, WA
ron.thom@pnl.gov

Will Global Warming Impact Eelgrass in the Pacific Northwest? (E2)

Dr. Thom has been conducting applied research on nearshore ecosystems since 1971.  His primary research focuses on the ecology and restoration of nearshore habitats.  He manages the Coastal Assessment and Restoration group at PNNL’s Marine Sciences Laboratory.  He is an Affiliate Associate Professor in the College of Ocean and Fiheries Sciences, Univ. of Washngton.

Scott Thomas
City of Burien
Project Manager
425 SW 144th Street
Burien, WA  98166
scottt@ci.burien.wa.us
Tel: (206) 248-5513
Fax: (206) 444-6813

Seahurst Park: Restoring Nearshore Habitat and Reconnecting Natural Sediment Supply Processes (F7)

J.A. Jeffrey Thompson, Ph.D.
Director
2WE Associates Consulting Ltd.
270 Broadwell Road
Salt Spring Island, BC  V8K 1H3
Canada
jthompson@2weassociates.com
Tel: 250-537-9308
Fax: 250-537-5621
URL: www.2weassociates.com

An Overview of Recent Organotin Studies in the Georgia Basin (B6)

Dr. Thompson is a principal of 2WE Associates Consulting Ltd.  Until 1997 he was a research scientist at the Institute of Ocean Sciences, Sidney, BC, where his research interests included the distribution and fate of organometallic compounds and trace elements in sediments and biota.  He holds a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from the University of Alberta.  He is a Fellow of the Chemical Institute of Canada and a member of the Society for Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.

R. Lee Thompson
University of Washington
Applied Physics Lab
Seattle, WA
thompson@apl.washington.edu

Blazed array sonar systems - a new technology for creating low-cost, high-resolution imaging sonar systems for fisheries management.   (P4)

Lee Thompson, PhD, specializes in high resolution sonar design and development. Dr. Thompson invented, developed, and is currently transitioning the Blazed Array sonar technology into Navy and commercial systems. This technology dramatically reduces size, weight, and power requirements for high resolution imaging sonar. His research interests include 2D and 3D sonar, signal and image processing, and high intensity focused ultrasound systems for medical applications. In order to facilitate the successful transition of this technology into commercial products, Dr. Thompson will move to full time status at BlueView Technologies for 12-18 months starting in March 2005.

David A. Thurman
Scientist
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
1100 Dexter Ave N. Suite 400
Seattle, WA  98109-3598
dave.thurman@pnl.gov
Tel: (206) 528-3221

Integrated Modeling for Water Resource Management (D4)

David Thurman is a Staff Scientist with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which he conducts innovative research in human-machine systems engineering and practical applications of information technology in national security and environmental domains.

Keith B. Tierney
PhD Candidate
Simon Fraser University
Biological Sciences
ktierney@sfu.ca
Tel: (604) 291-5634
Fax: (604) 291-3496

Glyphosate alters olfaction in juvenile coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch (A9)

 

Iona To
Environment Canada
Vancouver B.C. Canada
Iona.To@ec.gc.ca

Emission Reductions from the U-Pass Program in the Georgia Basin (B4)

Iona To is a fourth year Conservation Biology student from the University of British Columbia. Currently, she is completing her fourth Science Co-op term with the Air Quality Management Section of Environment Canada. There, she is providing technical assistance to further biodiesel and other diesel emission reduction initiatives in BC. She is also involved in other air quality issues such as First Nations and air quality management, and emission reductions from the U-Pass program.

Heather Trim
People For Puget Sound
Seattle, WA
htrim@pugetsound.org

Phthalates - the Next “Phosphate”? (B6)

Heather Trim, Urban Bays Project Coordinator for People For Puget Sound, began her career with CA-EPA working on standards, permits, and pollution assessments for the LA region. Later, as staff scientist for the LASGR Watershed Council she focused stormwater issues and habitat renewal. She joined PFPS in 2002 and works on water quality, the Seattle Waterfront, and the Duwamish Superfund Site. She holds a BS (Geology) from Yale University and a PhD (Geochemistry) from UCLA.

Alan C. Trimble
University of Washington
Biology
Seattle, WA
trimblea@u.washington.edu

Patterns of benthic production in Puget Sound: where and why do bivalves grow best? (A8)

Alan Trimble is a post-doctoral fellow at UW, working on food webs and restoration in a variety of Washington’s marine habitats. He received his PhD in 2001.

Nathaniel S. Trumbull
University of Washington
PO Box 85041
Seattle
Washington
98145-1041
trumbull@u.washington.edu
Tel: 206-934-4870

Views on Water Resources and Urban Planning in the Transition Economies (B7)

Nathaniel Trumbull is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Geography at the University of Washington. He is Co-Founder and Co-Director of the Transboundary Environmental Information Agency, a Russian environmental NGO based in St. Petersburg. He worked in St. Petersburg from 1995 to 1998. 

Fan Tsao
Conservation Scientist
Marine Conservation Biology Institute
15805 NE 47th Court, Redmond WA 98052
fan@mcbi.org
Tel: 425-883-8914
Fax: 425-883-3017
URL: www.mcbi.org

The Puget Sound/Georgia Basin Region Selected as a Priority Conservation Area in the Baja California to Bering Sea Initiative (D10)

Fan Tsao conducts research on human use of marine resources at Marine Conservation Biology Institute in Redmond Washington. When she is not working on the Baja California to Bering Sea initiative, she focuses on nation-wide deep-sea coral research and worldwide seamount conservation. She holds a Master of Marine Affairs degree from the University of Washington.

Margaret Tudor, Ph.D.
Co-Executive Director Pacific Education Institute
Market Place Office Building
724 Columbia St. NW, Suite 250
Olympia, WA 98501
mtudor@pacificeducationinstitute.org
tudormtt@dfw.wa.gov
Tel:  360 705 9291
Fax: 360 352 4621

The Effects of Field Science Research Integrated into K-12 Curriculum (C3)

Margaret Tudor is the Co-Executive Director of the Pacific Education Institute, working in-kind on behalf of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and the Washington Forest Protection Association.   Margaret is the Director of K-12 Environmental Education and Project WILD at WDFW and the National Director of The NatureMapping Program. 

Taina M. Tuominen
Environment Canada
Environmental Conservation Branch
Vancouver B.C. Canada
taina.tuominen@ec.gc.ca

Current In-use Pesticides in Streams Located in Agricultural, Urban and Relatively Undisturbed Areas of the Lower Fraser Valley (B10)

Taina has been with Environment Canada for 22 years working in the area of aquatic studies and water quality monitoring. She has headed the Aquatic Studies Section, or some facsimile of it, for about 15 years. Taina received her BSc and MSc from Simon Fraser University.

Terry Turner
Orcas Power and Light Cooperative
Eastsound, WA
tturner@opalco.com

Reducing the installation impact of submarine cables on eelgrass (Zostera marina): Details of a new technique. (F2)

Terry Turner works in the Engineering Department of Orcas Power & Light Cooperative and was the Project Manager for the Co-op’s installation of four new submarine power and fiber optic cables in 2004. A graduate in Environmental Sciences at Western Washington University’s Huxley College, Terry has been a resident of Orcas Island for the past 23 years, where he and his wife and children enjoy boating, fishing, sailing and generally playing outdoors in the islands.

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Jay Udelhoven
Assistant Division Manager - Program Development
Aquatic Resources Program
Washington Department of Natural Resources
1111 Washington St., SE
Olympia, Washington 98504-7027
jay.udelhoven@wadnr.gov
Tel:  (360) 902-1060
Fax: (360) 902-1786
URL: http://www.dnr.wa.gov/htdocs/aqr/

Conservation leasing in Washington State-partnerships for improving and protecting state-owned submerged lands (D10)

Jay Udelhoven is an Assistant Division Manager with WDNR's Aquatic Resources Program. Jay leads the Program Development Section, which is charged with developing plans, policies, laws, regulations, and strategies for the management of 2.4 million acres of state-owned aquatic lands. Prior to coming to WDNR in 2000, Jay worked in public lands management, planning, and research at the state and international levels in Florida, Kansas, and Africa. Jay holds a Master of Environmental Policy degree from the University of Denver and a Bachelor of Science in Natural Resources from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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Lance Vail
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
lance.vail@pnl.gov

Adaptive Management of Water Resources in the Puget Sound (E1)

Since 1981, Mr. Vail has been a research engineer at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Hydrology Group.  His research has involved the linkage of optimization techniques with advanced numerical simulation techniques to undestand and communicate tradeoffs involved in water resources management.

Graham C. van Aggelen
Environment Canada
Pacific Environmental Science Centre
North Vancouver B.C. Canada
Graham.vanaggelen@ec.gc.ca

Fish and Chips-Genomic Applications to New Toxicological Challenges (B6)

Head of Environment Canada’s, Environmental Toxicology laboratory and toxicogenomic programme at the Pacific Environmental Science Centre. Research areas include conventional aquatic toxicology and more recently the application of genomic and toxicogenomics to aquatic toxicology.

Brie Van Cleve
University of Washington
Washington Sea Grant Program
Seattle, WA

Next Steps in Nearshore Habitat Restoration for Puget Sound - the Practitioners Speak Out (F7)

Frances Brie Van Cleve spent the last two and half years working with a large-scale restoration effort in the Puget Sound. After completing her Mater’s degree in marine affairs at the University of Washington she worked as a research associate with Washington Sea Grant Program. She is currently a Knauss Fellow working on marine science and policy issues in Washington, D.C.


Albert van Roodselaar, Ph.D., P.Eng.,
Division Manager
Regional Engineering Analysis
Policy and Planning Department
Greater Vancouver Regional District
4330 Kingsway
Burnaby, BC. Canada V5H 4G8
Albert.van.Roodselaar@gvrd.bc.ca
Tel: 604-436-6772
Fax: 604-436-6970

Application of cautions, WArnings and triggers to benthos for the GVRD marine WWTP outfalls (B1)

A collaborative ambient research and monitoring program in the southern Strait of Georgia (E7)

Dr. Albert van Roodselaar is Division Manager for the Regional Engineering Analysis Division of the Policy and Planning Department of the Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD). His original training is as a chemical engineer and scientist. Among many other responsibilities, he masterminded the development of the cautions, triggers and warnings framework as part of the Liquid Waste Management Plan for the district. www.gvrd.bc.ca

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Jon Y. Wang
Environmental Scientist
Meteorological Service of Canada, Environment Canada
201 - 401 Burrard St
Vancouver, British Columbia, V6C 3S5
jon.wang@ec.gc.ca
Tel: 604-664-9237
Fax: 604-664-9195

Statistical Models for Spot Air Quality Forecasts (O3 and PM10) in British Columbia (P4)

Jon Y. Wang obtained his BEng in Engineering Geology from College of Geology, China in 1983; an MSc in Hydrogeology from Chinese Academy of Sciences, China in 1990; and a PhD in Engineering Hydrology from University of British Columbia, Canada in 2000. Since 2001, he has been involved in O3 and PM10 forecast model development and streamflow frequency analysis. His research interests are mainly in the areas of streamflow analysis and air quality modeling.


Larry Ward
Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe
51 Hatchery Road
Port Angeles Washington 98362
lward@elwha.nsn.us
Tel: 360.457.4012
Fax: 360.452.4848

Elwha and Glines Canyon dam removals: nearshore restoration and salmon recovery of the central Strait of Juan de Fuca (C4)

Larry, WArd is a fisheries biologist with the Elwha Klallam Tribe in Port Angeles Washington.  For the past 17 years he has managed the Lower Elwha Fish Hatchery and has supervised fish enhancement programs for the Tribe. He is active in salmon habitat restoration efforts on the North Olympic Peninsula and has participated in planning efforts for the removal of hydroelectric projects and the restoration of anadromous fish to the Elwha River basin. He holds a Master’s degree from Auburn University.

Jonathan A. Warrick
USGS
Coastal and Marine Geology
Santa Cruz CA
jwarrick@usgs.gov

Shoreline Change near the Elwha River - Impacts of Dams and Dam Removal. (A1)

Nearshore Impacts Resulting from Dam Removal on the Elwha River. (F4)

Dr. Jonathan Warrick is a research geologist for the Coastal and Marine Geology Program of the USGS in Santa Cruz, California. His research interests include coastal hydrology, geomorphology and oceanography, and he has focused much of his work on the dynamics and patterns of river discharge into the coastal zone. Jon received a Ph.D. in Marine Science from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2002.

Jody L. Watson
Capital Regional District
Integrated Stormwater, Harbours and Watersheds Pro
Victoria B.C. Canada
jwatson@crd.bc.ca

Using the Capital Regional District's Harbours Atlas for planning, managing and restoring harbour areas in Victoria, British Columbia (D4)

Ms., WAtson is the Harbours and Watershed Coordinator for the Capital Regional District, the regional level government located on the southern tip of Vancouver Island. Ms Watson received her B.Sc. with a Specialization in Zoology from the University of Alberta in 1994. She has worked extensively on collaborative community-based stewardship initiatives and is involved with several harbour environmental projects designed to protect, enhance and restore harbour and watershed ecosystems.

Andrew J. Weispfenning
Western Washington University
Environmental Sciences
Bellingham, WA
weispfa@cc.wwu.edu

Assessment of Bottomfish Density and Diversity within Potential Marine Reserves in Skagit County Washington (D9)

I am a second year Master’s candidate in the Marine and Estuarine Science Program at Western Washington University. I moved to Washington from Camanche, Iowa. I am interested in marine fish biology, ecology, and marine resource management issues and especially enjoy underwater research.

Trevor R. Welton
City of Surrey
Engineering
Surrey B.C. Canada
trevorwelton@city.surrey.bc.ca

Factors Influencing the Success of Riparian Planting Aspects of Fish Habitat Restoration Projects in the City of Surrey and Recommendations for Future Planting Plan Improvements. (F8)

James E. West
Washington Dept Fish and Wildlife
Olympia, WA
westjew@dfw.wa.gov

Persistent organic pollutants in whole bodies of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) in Puget Sound, Washington: evidence of environmental segregation of stocks based on contaminant levels and patterns (D8)

Jim West received his B.Sc. in Marine Biology from Southampton College, Long Island, NY in 1980, and his M.Sc. in Zoology from the University of Hawaii in 1985.  He has been with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife since 1990, and has worked in Puget Sound on research projects dealing with artificial reefs, function of nearshore habitats as nurseries for juvenile rockfishes, drift algae habitats, rockfish growth and genetics, and toxic contaminants in marine and anadromous species.  He is also keenly interested in developing a better understanding of the effects of human activities on the healthy function of Puget Sound’s ecosystem.

Jacqueline White
Undergradaute student
University of Washington Department of Biology
Ruesink Lab, Box 351800
Seattle, WA 98195
jmwhite@u.washington.edu
Tel: 206-685-6893
URL: http://depts.washington.edu/jlrlab/

Olympia oysters: Where have they gone, and can they return? (A8)

Jacqueline (Jackie) White is an undergraduate in Biology and Environmental Studies at the University of Washington.  She will graduate in June 2005 and plans to pursue graduate studies in Environmental Science, Policy, and Management.  An interest in marine ecology and conservation brought Jackie to Dr. Jennifer Ruesink’s lab where she has assisted on projects and completed her own studies on Olympia oysters over the past year.

Jacques R. White, Ph.D.
Manager, Marine Conservation Program
The Nature Conservancy
217 Pine Street, Suite 1100
Seattle, WA 98101
jwhite@tnc.org
Tel: (206) 343-4345, ext. 363
Fax: (206) 233-1628
URL: http://nature.org/wherewework/northamerica/states/washington/

Conservation leasing in Washington State-partnerships for improving and protecting state-owned submerged lands (D10)

Jacques White received Bachelor’s Degrees in Oceanography and Zoology in 1982 from the University of Washington.  After a short stint working as a research technician in the swamps, bayous and coastal waters of the Gulf of Mexico, he earned a Masters Degree in Marine Science from Louisiana State University in 1986.  Fleeing Baton Rouge, he and his family moved to the Eastern Shore of Maryland where in 1991 he received a Ph.D. in Marine, Estuarine and Environmental Science from the University of Maryland.  Jacques worked as a scientist in the Chesapeake and Delaware Bay regions of the mid Atlantic Coast until 1995 when he moved his family to Washington State so he could become the director of a new Habitat Restoration Program at People For Puget Sound.  Jacques recently joined The Nature Conservancy in Seattle to start a new Marine Conservation Program, and has served since their inception on the Steering Committee and Implementation Team of the Puget Sound Nearshore Ecosystem Restoration Project (PSNERP).

Paul H. Whitfield
Meteorological Service of Canada
Environment Canada
Vancouver  B.C. Canada
paul.whitfield@ec.gc.ca

Simulating Future Streamflows in Rainfall Driven Rivers in British Columbia Using IHACRES and Improved Climate Downscalin (E1)

Tina Whitman
Friends of the San Juans
Friday Harbor WA
tina@sanjuans.org

From Science to Stewardship: the application of forage fish habitat assessment data to the protection of shoreline resources in San Juan County Washington. (A7)

Tina Whitman is the Science Director at Friends of the San Juans and manages nearshore habitat projects for FRIENDS.  Tina has a Master of Science from the University of Oregon, where her research focused on the incorporation of wildlife habitat and population data into land use planning processes.

Jennifer Whitney
Biologist
16018 Mill Creek Boulevard, Mail Stop: TB44
Mill Creek, WA 98012-1296
whitnjlw@dfw.wa.gov
Tel: 425-775-1311 ext. 107
Fax: 425-338-1066

Distribution and Abundance of Pacific Herring (Clupea pallasi) Spawn Deposition for Cherry Point Washington stock, 1973-2004. (A4)

Mark S. Wigmosta
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Richland, WA
mark.wigmosta@pnl.gov

Application of Spatially-Distributed Watershed Models for Resource Management (F10)

Dr. Wigmosta is a Chief Scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA.  He has served as PI on numerous studies sponsored by the US EPA, DoD, NOAA, NASA, DOE, and private industry to evaluate the effect of land use and climate change on distributed watershed hydrology and water resources.  Dr. Wigmosta led development of the Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model (DHSVM) while on a DOE Post-Doctoral appointment at the University of Washington. 

Darcy Wildermuth
16018 Mill Creek Boulevard, Mail Stop: TB44
Mill Creek, WA 98012-1296
wildedaw@dfw.wa.gov
Tel: 425-775-1311 ext. 105
Fax: 425-338-1066

Distribution and Abundance of Pacific Herring (Clupea pallasi) Spawn Deposition for Cherry Point Washington stock, 1973-2004. (A4)

John F. Williams
Director, Videographer
Still Hope Productions, Inc.
P.O. Box 1407
Suquamish, WA  98392-1407
jw@StillHopeProductions.com
Tel: (360) 598-4152
URL: www.StillHopeProductions.com

Return of the Plankton: The Seasons Underwater in Puget Sound (PDVD)

John F. Williams:  founder, Still Hope Productions (award-winning, educational underwater videos); sea-going scientific technician (18 years); President Washington SCUBA alliance, active participant in the Orca Pass Transboundary Work Group.

Gregory D. Williams
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory
Sequim, WA
gregory.williams@pnl.gov

Eelgrass (Zostera marina) transplant survival and density trajectories over eight years at a North Puget Sound restoration site (F8)

Greg Williams is a fisheries biologist (M.S. University of WA) in the Coastal Assessment and Restoration group at PNNL’s Marine Sciences Laboratory. His background is in nearshore and estuarine ecology, with research experience in tidal wetland and eelgrass habitat restoration, long-term baseline monitoring and assessment, Dungeness crab ecology, food webs, exotic species introductions, and effects of nearshore habitat modifications on biota. He also has over 12 years experience as a scientific diver.

Megan Wilson
Landscape Architect
WRA Environmental Consultants
2169 E Francisco Blvd., STE G
San Rafael, CA 94901
mewilson@wra-ca.com
Tel: 415-454-8868
URL: http://wra-ca.com

Great (Wet) Streets: Merging Street Design and Stormwater Management to Improve Neighborhood Streets (B2)

Megan Wilson received a BS in Conservation of Wildland Resources and a Master’s in Landscape Architecture at University of Washington. She has worked as a Resource Planning Intern for Seattle Public Utilities, focusing on design guidelines for Natural Drainage Systems stormwater projects on residential steets.  She is now a landscape designer with WRA Environmental Consultants in San Rafael, CA where she works primarily on wetland and stormwater management systems design and planning.

Robert Wilson
Senior Biologist
2WE Associates Consulting Ltd.
4660 Vantreight Drive
Victoria, BC V8N 3X1
Tel: 250-472-2254
Fax: 250-472-9475
rwilson@2weassociates.com
URL: http://www.2weassociates.com

An Overview of Recent Organotin Studies in the Georgia Basin (B6)

Sediment Quality at the Point Grey Disposal Site, 1975-2001 (D2)

Bob Wilson is presently with 2WE Associates Consulting Ltd. in Victoria BC.  Before joining 2WE Associates, he worked for Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Environment Canada.   He has worked on many of today's environmental issues, including the design and implementation of monitoring programs, fish habitat issues, climate change, environmental indicators and state of environment reporting, pollution effects, managing and protecting Canada's coastal zone, and the environmental effects of resource extraction and processing. He holds an MSc degree in Biology (Limnology) and is a Registered Professional Biologist (BC).

Peter Wimberger
Professor
Biology, Slater Museum of Natural History,
1500 N Warner
Tacoma, WA 98416
wimbo@ups.edu
Tel: 253 879-2784
Fax: 253 879-3352

Will the introduced mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis outcompete the native mussel M. trossulus in Puget Sound? A study of relative frequencies, growth and survival among different habitats (P2)

At University of Puget Sound I teach courses on diversity, evolution and environmental issues.  At home, I am mostly a chauffeur for my two children.  In my spare time, I have pursued my interests in evolutionary and conservation biology with research on rockfish population genetics and non-indigenous mussels in Puget Sound.  I am currently the Director of the Slater Museum of Natural History at UPS.

Brian Winter
Olympic National Park
600 E. Park Avenue
Port Angeles Washington 98362
Brian_winter@nps.gov
Tel: 360.565.1323

Elwha and Glines Canyon dam removals: nearshore restoration and salmon recovery of the central Strait of Juan de Fuca (C4)

Dr. Winter obtained a B.S. (Natural Resources Planning and Interpretation) from Humboldt State University (HSU) in 1978 and a M.S. (Fisheries) from HSU in 1983.  He completed his Ph.D. (Fisheries) from the University of Washington in 1992.  He worked as a Fisheries Biologist for the Point No Point Treaty Council from 1985-1988 and for the National Marine Fisheries Service from 1988-1993.  He has been Project Manager for the Elwha River Restoration Project with Olympic National Park from 1993 to present.

Gary N. Wood
Island County Marine Resources Committee
(Northwest Straits Commission member)
Coupeville, WA
intertidal.consulting@verizon.net

The Island County 'Certified Shore Stewards' Program (C3)

The Incredible Egg Hunt -- Mapping Forage Fish in the Northwest Straits (2001-2003) (P1)

Gary Wood (BS University of California, Berkeley, ‘68; JD Hastings Law, ‘72) serves as Excutive Director of the Island County Marine Resources Committee, and sits on the Northwest Straits Commission. He has designed and managed numerous projects to conserve and restore Puget Sound’s marine resources. In 2003, he was a co-recipient of the “2003 Coastal America Partnership” award for his role in the Northwest Strait’s Commission’s Derelict Gear Recovery project. From 2001-2003 he coordinated the Regional Forage Fish surveys.

Nikki N. Wright
SeaChange Marine Conservation Society
3622 West 3rd Avenue
Vancouver, B.C., Canada V6R 1L9
seachange@shaw.ca
URL: www.shim.bc.ca/atlases/atlas.html

Restoring Marine Habitats and Mending Social Communities (F10)

Community Stewardship and Field based Environmental Education (P6)

Nikki Wright has had experience with community organizing for over thirty years, marine education for the last sixteen years, and has acted as the Executive Director of a marine community based non-profit society since 1998. She has created hands-on education programs for youth and the public on eelgrass ecology and organized a now three year project on eelgrass mapping for the BC coast. She serves as Chair for the Seagrass Conservation Working Group, a consortium of provincial and federal agencies, conservation groups and consultants working together since 2001 for the conservation of seagrasses in B.C. She has successfully co-ordinated six eelgrass restoration projects in collaboration with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, BC Parks and other community, federal and provincial organizations.

Sandy Wyllie-Echeverria
Center for Urban Horticulture
College of Forest Resources
Seattle, WA
zmseed@u.washington.edu

Retrospective analysis of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) abundance in small embayments within the San Juan Archipelago Washington. (D9)

Dr. S. Wyllie-Echeverria, Research Scientist, Center for Urban Horticulture, UW, specializes in the autecology, ecology and ethnobotany of Northern Hemisphere seagrasses. In this capacity he works with undergraduate and graduate students. His interest lies in collaborative efforts to conserve and protect this vital nearshore resource and has teamed with Dr. Thomas Mumford Jr., WDNR and Nan Hu, College of Forest Resources, UW, to undertake a retrospective analysis of Zostera marina (eelgrass) in the San Juan Archipelago.

Tina Wyllie-Echeverria
Wyllie-Echeverria Associates
Shaw Island WA
tinawe@fidalgo.net

Rockfish in San Juan County-Recommendations for Management and Research (A4)

Juvenile salmon in the San Juan Archipelago (P2)

Tina Wylllie Echeverria is a Fisheries Oceanographer. She has worked in the Northeastern Pacific Ocean on the basic life history and environmental variables that affect groundfish populations. Her work includes rockfishes, gadids, flatfishes and on projects with the NMFS, PMEL for the past 30 years and more recently on privately managed grants and contracts.

Victoria Wyllie-Echeverria
Student
Skagit Valley Community College
Friday Harbor Laboratories
P.O. Box 111
Shaw Island, WA 98286
botany@fidalgo.net
Tel: 360-708-7852
Fax: 360-468-4619

Centennial Plant Collection: Revisiting 1904 Herbarium Specimens

from the San Juan Islands in 2004 (P1)

Victoria Wyllie-Echeverria is a recently graduated home-schooled student from Shaw Island, WA.  For the past four years she has been conducting botanical studies that include ethnobotany and taxonomy.  She is currently interning with Dr. Eugene Kozloff, studying kinorhynchs (marine invertebrates), and will be heading to the University of Victoria in the fall for undergraduate work.

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Gina M. Ylitalo
NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center
Seattle, WA
gina.ylitalo@noaa.gov

Dietary sources of persistent organic pollutants in southern resident killer whales (D8)

Gina Ylitalo is a research chemist at the NOAA Fisheries Service’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA.  She received a B.S. in Biochemistry and M.S. in Chemistry from Western Washington University.  Currently, she is the Team Leader of the Ecological Chemistry Team of the Environmental Assessment Program.  Her research interests include assessing links between exposure to chemical contaminants and potential health effects to marine mammals and fish as well as developing methods to analyze for new contaminants of interest in marine sediments and biota.

Lisa Younglove
University of Washington
Institute for Risk Analysis and Risk Communication
Seattle, WA
lry@u.washington.edu

Investigating Ocean and Human Health Risks from Harmful Algal Blooms using an Integrated Framework (P2)

Integrated Framework for Urbanization, Human Health and Marine Interactions: A PCB Case Study (P5)

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Craig ZumBrunnnen
University of Washington
Geography
Seattle, WA
craigzb@earthlink.net

Trans-border Comparison of Three Sustainable Cities Programs: Vancouver, Seattle and Oslo (C8)

Craig ZumBrunnen is Professor of Geography at the University of Washington and is a faculty member of two Jackson School of International Studies (JSIS) programs. As Co-Director of the UW Program on the Environment (PoE) 2000-2004, he worked with the JSIS Canadian Studies program to create a course on the Puget Sound - Georgia Basin involving UW, UBC, WWU and Battelle. Currently, he is co-PI on the UW NSF-funded IGERT program in urban ecology.