Workshops and Field Trips

2019 Workshops and Field Trips

Workshops

Workshops are scheduled for Thursday, April 11, 2019.

WS 1 –Conceptual Site Model Development and Translation to Numerical Models
Instructors: Vicky Freedman and Mike Truex from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Matt Tonkin, S.S. Papadopulos & Associates, Inc.

Groundwater management requires understanding of the full system so that impact of potential actions can be identified. A first step in gaining this system-level understanding is to integrate multiple physical, geochemical and microbiological factors into a conceptual site model (CSM). A CSM is a tool that identifies and organizes factors important to a site and describes the site-specific environmental setting, contaminant properties, and risks to provide a basis to select an appropriate remedy or management action. As such, the CSM is a core tool for environmental management, starting at the onset of site characterization and continuing in usefulness until the site action is completed. In many cases, to apply the CSM for remedy decision-making and design, the CSM must be translated into a quantitative description of the site as a numerical flow and transport model. This workshop will present how 1) site data are mapped into numerical models; and 2) CSMs are used to build numerical models describing saturated and unsaturated flow and transport. The first half of the workshop will include a presentation of CSM approaches and supporting tools, with interactive elements to allow discussion of participants’ specific concerns. In the second half of the workshop, the course will demonstrate how the CSM site-specific information is integrated into numerical models using a freely available graphical user interface that allows the user to visualize the model domain (e.g., boundary conditions and geologic materials). The focus will be on identifying the level of modeling complexity needed to adequately represent the CSM. Decisions on simulator selection, numerical considerations (e.g. grids), heterogeneity and numerical approaches will be evaluated with respect to the CSM and data requirements. Hands-on demonstrations of different modeling approaches will be an integral part of understanding the CSM translation to the numerical modeling framework. Laptops will maximize the workshop experience, but not required.

Hotel Murano Venice Rooms, 8:00 AM – 12:00 PM
cost: $75.00 for conference attendees, $100.00 for workshop only
early morning and mid-morning break provided, lunch is on your own

Minimum 10, Maximum 20
Contact: Chris Allen cwa@shanwil.com

WS 2 – Understanding and Addressing Well Performance Issues
(Note: This workshop has been awarded 7.5 CEUs from the WA State Dept. of Ecology for drillers and .7 CEUs from the WA State Dept. of Health for Water Operators


Instructors: Jim Bailey, Shannon & Wilson, Inc. and others

Problems with well performance are usually preventable, often start with well construction and development, and are then exacerbated by water quality conditions, well operation and rehabilitation efforts. This class will discuss the key factors affecting well performance including new well design, initial screen development, biological and mechanical plugging, well operation, and rehabilitation methods. An asset management based approach is described that helps prioritize maintenance decisions and long term well field operation.

Over the past several years there has been significant research done worldwide related to optimizing well performance. This research has included looking at the mechanisms involved with biological and mechanical plugging of aquifers, and the effectiveness of various rehabilitation technologies. The class will also discuss several studies in Europe that looked at the mechanisms associated with poor well performance and innovative approaches being used to prevent or correct poor well performance.

Hotel Murano Venice Rooms, 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM
cost: $125.00  for conference attendees, $150 for workshop only
early morning, mid-morning, and afternoon refreshment break provided. You can order a box lunch for $25 when you register or have lunch on your own
Minimum 10, Maximum 20
Contact: Chris Allen cwa@shanwil.com

WS 3 – ITRC Guidance: Remediation Management of Complex Sites – CANCELLED

Instructors: John Price, Washington State Department of Ecology, Elisabeth Hawley, P.E. Geosyntec Consultants, and Mike Truex, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

This course will provide a framework based on adaptive site management principles for remediation management of complex sites. It will also identify and integrate technical and nontechnical challenges into site objectives, remediation approach, and develop a performance based action plan to guide long-term management. This training will interest state and federal regulators at complex sites, environmental professionals, and public and tribal stakeholders.

At some sites, complex site-specific conditions make it difficult to fully remediate environmental contamination. Both technical and nontechnical challenges can impede remediation and may prevent a site from achieving federal- and state-mandated regulatory cleanup goals within a reasonable time-frame. For example, technical challenges may include geologic, hydrogeologic, geochemical, and contaminant-related conditions as well as large-scale or surface conditions. In addition, nontechnical challenges may also play a role such as managing changes that occur over long time frames, overlapping regulatory and financial responsibilities between agencies, setting achievable site objectives, maintaining effective institutional controls, redevelopment and changes in land use, and funding considerations. This short course and associated ITRC guidance, Remediation Management of Complex Sites, provide a recommended process for remediation management at complex sites, termed “adaptive site management”. Adaptive site management is a comprehensive, flexible, and iterative process of remediation management that is well-suited for complex sites, where there is significant uncertainty in remedy performance predictions. Adaptive site management includes periodically evaluating and adjusting the remedial approach, which may involve multiple technologies at any one time and changes in technologies over time. Comprehensive planning and scheduled periodic evaluations of remedy performance help decision makers track remedy progress and improve the timeliness of remedy optimization, reevaluations, or transition to other technologies/contingency actions. Participants will learn how to apply the guidance to improve decision making and remediation management at complex sites. The guidance is intended to benefit a variety of site decision makers, including regulators, responsible parties and their consultants, and public and tribal stakeholders. Case studies will be used to describe real-world applications of remediation and remediation management at complex sites.

Hotel Murano Venice Rooms, 1:00 PM – 5:00 PM
cost: $75.00 for conference attendees, $100.00 for workshop only
Afternoon refreshment break provided, lunch is on your own
Minimum 10, Maximum 20
Contact: Chris Allen cwa@shanwil.com


 

Field Trips

FT 1 – SR530 Landslide Oso, Washington,
Monday, April 8, 2019, 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

The SR530 Landslide near Oso Washington was a tragic debris flow that claimed the lives of 43 people on March 22, 2014. The landslide triggered local, state, and federal agencies to increase the assessment of geologic hazards across the State of Washington and evaluate local land use decision making in geologically hazardous areas.  Joe Wartman (UW H.R. Berg Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering) and students who have lead trips to the landslide area near Oso, Washington will lead the field trip and discussion surrounding research on the mechanisms leading to and during the debris flow and the ongoing studies to assess, understand, and prepare for the risks associated with debris flows.

7:50 AM: Meet in Hotel Murano lobby.
8:00 AM: Vans will depart from in front of the Hotel Murano.
5:00 PM: Arrive back at hotel.

Cost: $50.00, boxed lunch included – select lunch option at registration
Minimum 10, Maximum 26

Note: Please plan to dress for the weather.
Contact: Jason Shira, jshira@aspectconsulting.com

FT 2 – Elwha River Restoration Port Angeles, Washington,
Friday, April 12, 2019, 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Elwha River Restoration project includes the removal of two large dams on the Elwha River, restoration of the Elwha watershed, its native anadromous fish, and the natural downstream transport of sediment and woody debris. The Elwha project, including dam removal, restoration efforts, and protection measures, is serving as a “living laboratory” for monitoring large-scale ecosystem recovery and investigating particular ecosystem processes and components. Mike McHenry (Fisheries Biologist Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe), George Pess (Watershed Program Manager NOAA Fisheries), and Tim Abbe (Principal Geomorphologist Natural System Designs) will lead the field trip and discussion of their findings and observations concerning the watershed response to restoration efforts and ecosystem recovery.

7:50 AM: Meet in Hotel Murano lobby.
8:00 AM: Vans will depart from in front of the Hotel Murano.
5:00 PM: Arrive back at hotel.
Cost: $75.00, boxed lunch included – select lunch option at registration
Minimum 10, Maximum 26
Note: Please dress for the weather.
Contact:  Jason Shira, jshira@aspectconsulting.com