Event Calendar

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November 2014

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University of Washinton School of Drama

11/04/2014 - 7:30pm

Cathy Madden 
Principal Lecturer, School of Drama

Pioneering Spirit in the Celebrity of the Discontented Everyman:  F.M. Alexander
One function of celebrity is to hold up to us what is possible. The kind of celebrity represented by F.M. Alexander is one that reminds us we can pioneer our lives: responding to discontent with constructive desire and steadfast in our ability to be a celebrity in our own world.

Cathy Madden leads workshops on the Alexander Technique around the world. Her book Integrative Alexander Technique Practice for Performing Artists: Onstage Synergy is scheduled for publication in January 2015.

 


 

2014/2015 Performing Arts Lecture Series
From Helen of Troy to the Kardashian sisters, celebrities, or (in Joseph Roach’s definition) “abnormally interesting people,” have fascinated the public imagination over the centuries. This series of lectures from scholars and art practitioners across academic disciplines considers why certain historical figures or fictional characters have possessed a special power to fascinate their public.

Naghmeh Samini

11/06/2014 - 1:30pm to 3:00pm

Naghmeh Samini, Iranian playwright and Affiliate Asst Professor here in the School of Drama, will be talking about "Translation and the Iranian Theater: A Discussion of 'Home' by Naghmeh Samini" on November 7, 1:30-3:00pm in Smith Hall room 306.

History Professor Joel Walker will be posting readings for the event here -
https://catalyst.uw.edu/workspace/jwalker/46173/344919
 

Shannon Jackson

11/13/2014 - 4:00pm

 

In the last two decades, readers, critics, artists, curators, and citizen-spectators have been contending with a new--or newly redefined--ethos of performance. Curators now regularly install choreography in galleries.  Visual artists are staging operas. Performances are staged in the lobbies of museums as well in at the center of its exhibitions. Meanwhile, civic leaders tout the importance of “creativity” in vitalizing cities, seeking to attract designers, new restaurants, and technology entrepreneurs to their neighborhoods. Cities stage site-specific festivals and promote themselves within an expanding roster of international biennials. Cultural centers around the globe consistently use a performance-centered vocabulary to frame their aesthetic contributions and their public programming and outreach. In this expanded cultural landscape, all participants are encouraged to act, to experience, to stage, and to try out alternate selves and behaviors. Meanwhile, many wonder whether this compulsion to perform is symptomatic of a wider global shift, one that sees cultural economies fueling and being fueled by the pressures of so-called “post-Fordist” service economy. 

In her lecture, Shannon Jackson takes stock of recent trends in a wide cultural landscape. Recalling some of the central debates in the field of performance studies, she explores and juxtaposes the very different vocabularies and histories that artists, critics, curators, and citizens bring to bear in this scene of aesthetic and social experiment. She also examines key sites of experimentation and debate, asking how artists and organizers are incorporating but also questioning the experiential ethos of a service economy.

Shannon Jackson is the Richard & Rhoda Goldman Chair in the Arts & Humanities at the University of California, Berkeley, where she is a professor of Rhetoric and of Theater, Dance, & Performance Studies. She is also the Director of the Arts Research Center.