Course Archives

  • ARCH 351 C: Romanesque, Gothic, and Renaissance Architecture (VLPA)
    SLN 10379 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Brian McLaren (Architecture)
    Office: Arch Hall 109, Box 355720
    Phone: 543-4966
    bmclaren@u.washington.edu
    MWF
    F
    930-1020
    1030-1120
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 15 students

    Add code required. Available as of October 29 in MGH 211.

    This course presents a survey of architecture from about 750 to about 1789. Examples are drawn from the traditions of Western and Islamic architecture during the periods usually termed the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the Baroque, with particular interest in the formation of and interaction between these traditions.

    Recommended preparation:
    This is an undergraduate upper division and graduate level class, and as such we assume you are responsible students who attend class regularly and plan ahead for assignments and exams. We recommend that you read and review the assigned material before the lectures in which it will be covered. Because the lectures do not directly follow the order of the text, it may be useful first to read an entire chapter or set of chapters in anticipation of the lectures dealing with the material covered. Although Arch 350 is not a prerequisite for the class, the material covered in it is helpful for understanding the course content of Arch 351. Required text: Marvin Trachtenberg and Isabelle Hyman, Architecture, from Prehistory to Postmodernity, Second Edition (New York: H.N. Abrams, 2002).

    Class assignments and grading:
    There will be two tests, two take-home writing assignments, and approximately 215 pages of required readings.

    Test responses will be evaluated for accuracy, thoughtfulness and clarity. Assignments will be evaluated for thoroughness, quality of ideas, and clarity of presentation (this can include writing and graphics). Each test and assignment will be given a percentage score. Final percentage grades will be calculated according to the weighting below and then converted to the University's 4.0 scale using a curve. This means that your final grade will be assessed relative to the performance of the others in this class.

    Assignment 1: 20 % of course grade
    Assignment 2: 20 % of course grade
    Test 1: 30 % of course grade
    Test 2: 30 % of course grade

  • ART 339 B: Honors Photography (VLPA)
    SLN 10500 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Zack Bent (Art)
    MW
    830-1120
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 20 students

    Add code required. Available as of October 29 in MGH 211.

    Introduces a range of theories, ideas, techniques, and processes of still photography in a fine art context. Emphasizes photography's creative potential.

  • Honors 211 A: Eco-Cinema: Filming the Ethics and Aesthetics of Waste (VLPA)
    SLN 14735 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Jennifer Bean (Comparative Literature)
    Office: C-522 Padelford, Box 354338
    Phone: 206 616-6781
    jmbean@u.washington.edu
    MW
    1130-120
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    The effect of modern culture on the environment and on our bodies is everywhere evident. We have reached an age when human advances in science and industrialism are damaging the planet's basic life support systems, generating waste that the environment can no longer tolerate. To add injury to insult, the human mind that made such advances possible in the first place turns out to have a mouth through which it is fed. And it is eating garbage.

    The paradoxes of the present age have become the subject of a 21st century film and media movement ranging from CNN sponsored television programs on renewable energy, to animated allegories produced by PIXAR, through science-fiction fantasies of future catastrophe and documentary filmmakers who take their own bodies as "visible evidence" of environmental and physical crisis. While this recent representational movement forms a substantial component of this course, any informed conception of cinematic "aesthetics and ethics" in moments of perceived social crisis demands a historical purview. Due to the rhetorical potency of filmmaking as a tool for public education and advocacy, for instance, the form has frequently served as a powerful instrument of rationality, harnessed to the manufacture of social consent in a tradition that reaches back to ethnographic and adventure films of the 1920s and "New Deal-era" propaganda and animated comedies of the 1930s. At the same time, alternative rhetorical and ethical ends that have shaped cinema's engagement with social concerns in recent years, in some cases by rendering disaster or waste "sublime," draws from a tradition reaching back through cold war films of the 1950s and the innovations of filmmakers such as Stanley Kubrick and Werner Herzog. We will pay particular attention to films that forcibly demonstrate the unraveling of certainty in the visible field and play with cinematic techniques-editing tempos, camera angles, lighting, framing devices, time-lapse photography, extreme close or long shots, mobile or still cameras, etc.-in order to question conventional models of perception and knowledge.

    Class Structure: Formal Sessions and Film Screenings
    Given what literary critic William Rueckert termed the First Law of Ecology-"Everything is connected to everything else"-this is a particularly ambitious course. You will learn to employ a set of analytical and critical skills intrinsic to film and media studies that will provide a foundation for our study. But we will also be grappling with an ensemble of interlocking ideas, texts, people, and institutions-a sprawling formation within which environmental discourse historically has attained intellectual, popular and legal status. Approximately 12 films will form our primary focus and another 30 films and media texts will be considered in short clips and excerpts; readings will include work by sociologists, historians, film critics, philosophers, and natural scientists among others. Regular class sessions meet twice a week (M/W). An additional two sessions (T/Th) will be designated for film screenings. You are highly encouraged to attend all regular screenings in the assigned classroom, but in cases of scheduling conflict you may also watch these films on your own in the Media Center on campus (2nd floor, Suzallo Library) where all titles will be on reserve, or via NetFlix, etc, if those services are available to you.

    Regular Assignments and Final Project:
    In the first half of the quarter assignments include weekly exercises such as go-post responses to materials, film segmentation analyses, and oral presentations on relevant materials. A mid-term exam will be administered in week five. Through these foundational assignments you will develop research skills and the critical tools necessary to mount a final project. For that project, you will have the option of writing a research paper that incorporates film frames from the texts you are studying and analyzing; another option will be to produce a short film (approximately 15-20 minutes maximum) that directly reflects the concerns of the class. In order to accomplish these goals an adventurous and inquisitive spirit, as well as a mind open to opinions and perspectives that might differ from your own is absolutely necessary. No prior filmmaking or film studies experience required.

  • Honors 211 B: Indian Literature & Popular Film (VLPA)
    SLN 14736 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Heidi Pauwels (Asian Languages and Literature)
    hpauwels@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    1230-220
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    This course focuses on how Indian literature is transformed in film and on television, including the creative appropriation of scripture on the screen. The goal is to foster understanding of Indian aesthetics for appreciating literature and film as well as to question the use of literature (religious and secular) for socio-political agendas. The class raises questions at the interface of cinema and literature, such as how popular Indian films change the way literature is read, offer different (broader or narrower) interpretations, and shift plots, stories, and characters to accommodate the medium and the economics of the genre. It also raises issues of canonization of literature and film classics. We explore the multiple agents at work in such processes, paying special attention to political, sociological, psychological and economic forces of the market place.


    Format and Evaluation
    Students complete a weekly writing assignment (try-out in W1, counts from W2-9): totaling 8 screening reports that count for their grade. They will post this on our GoPost class board after seeing the movie (suggestions for format, see guidelines). It has to be posted either on the same Wednesday night or at the latest by the next morning 9 am, so others can see it and read prior to the discussion. In preparation for the paired discussions, each partner will read and prepare comments on the other's post. After the discussion, students will incorporate the peer-feedback and polish their initial draft into a short essay, which they keep for their final portfolio. They have to polish their screening reports into a full essay only every other week, for a total of 4 such essays (see guidelines for details).

    Students will work towards a final presentation in class during the final week of instruction, which they will write up as a paper due during final's week. By the middle of week 9, students will post an abstract indicating the topic and outlining the basic argument of their paper, which they will present in class the next week. The instructor will organize the papers in panels and let students know when they are to present by the end of week 9. The presentations take place during week 10. All students are expected to attend all peers' presentations and give peer feedback to each other.


    Evaluation will be based on:
    - Final paper and presentation: 30 + 10%
    - Weekly screening report and bi-weekly essay for final portfolio: 10+40%
    - Participation in discussions and class: 10%

  • Honors 211 C: Introduction to Bilingualism: Ways of Being
    SLN 14737 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Katarzyna Dziwirek (Slavic Languages and Literatures)
    Office: M260 Smith, Box 353580
    Phone: 543-7691
    dziwirek@u.washington.edu
    MW
    230-420
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 20 students

    Cross-listed with SLAV 210 A.

    The course offers several perspectives on bilingualism. From personal to global, from the linguistic aspects of code-switching to cultural aspects of living in two languages. We examine how bilingual children acquire two languages, consider the experiences of bilingual adults, and study bilingualism as a societal phenomenon (diglossia and language choice, language policies, linguistic identity, language rights, linguistic minorities, etc.). Students do not need to speak a Slavic language. The bilingual experience of emotions and language maintenance and linguistic diversity in the Pacific Northwest are two important topics of the course. There is a service-learning project, in which students conduct a survey of a minority language spoken in our community, i.e., the greater Seattle area. It can be a language of an immigrant community or a Native American language.

    Grading:
    25% - Study Activities
    50% - service-learning project
    25% - quizzes

  • FISH 101 AH: Water & Society (I&S / NW)
    SLN 14169 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Julian Olden (Aquatic & Fishery Sciences)

    Phone: 206 616-3112
    olden@u.washington.edu
    Th
    130-320
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students

    Students must also register for FISH 101 A lecture (SLN 14163). See Time Schedule for day/time information.

    Water will be the Oil of the 21st century and beyond- the invaluable commodity that determines the wealth of nations, and the health of humans and the freshwater ecosystems upon which we depend. Mark Twain once said "Whiskey is for drinking; water is for fighting over." We all know too well the importance of clean, fresh water; but do you know the real reasons why water shortages have led to environmental degradation and intense social conflicts throughout the globe? Many of the most dangerous human diseases are water-borne; how are society's actions exacerbating these? Why is the biodiversity of freshwater ecosystems the most imperiled on the planet? Is Seattle really a 'wet' place or are we running out of sustainable water supplies? This course will examine these and many related questions to improve our understanding of human dependencies and effects on freshwater ecosystems.

    Student learning goals
    As a result of this course, students will have a strong understanding of the tight linkages between water, the environment, and human society. Specifically, this course aims to i) introduce students to contemporary issues and challenges in freshwater ecology and resource management; ii) develop students' skills to critically evaluate scientific information; iii) develop students' writing skills to effectively communicate issues to a variety of audiences; iv) increase awareness that human existence depends on a supply of clean and abundant water; and v) explore ways that individuals and society can reduce their impacts on water resources.

  • Honors 391 A: "I Am Charlotte Simmons": An Interactive Health Seminar Based on the Novel by Tom Wolfe (VLPA / I&S / NW)
    SLN 14742 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Clarence Spigner (Health Services)
    Office: H-692 Health Sciences Building, Box 357660
    Phone: 206 616-2948
    cspigner@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    130-320
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 35 students

    This seminar will engage in intense discussion about student life and encompass key aspects of health and wellbeing. The framework is the controversial novel, I am Charlotte Simmons, by Tom Wolfe, that chronicles the world view of an 18 year-old undergraduate female, Charlotte Simmons, and her first year at a northeastern college. The highly readable work addresses college campus issues including self esteem, sexual risk-taking, cultures of drinking, date-rape, pathological narcissism, depression, disclosure, student-athletes, elitism, sororicide and fraternities, social support, and family-ties. These social dynamics are reflected in brutal, outrageous and stylistic formats in Charlotte's Alice in Wonderland initiation into year-one of undergraduate life. A chronology of events builds in the 34 chapter novel to inform a deeper understanding of the human condition. In this course/seminar, health education theories serve are frameworks; such as Social Learning or Cognitive Theory, the Theory of Reasoned Action, the Stages of Change or Trans-theoretical Model, and the Health Belief Model.

    The Socratic approach is employed to give students a voice. Students must bring the maturity and intellect to critically examine both the summit and the pitfalls of campus life.

  • Honors 394 A: Comparative Ideologies: Human Rights Movements (VLPA / I&S)
    SLN 14743 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Clare Bright (Gender Studies (GWSS))
    Office: B-110 Padelford, Box 354345
    Phone: (206) 543-6900
    cbright@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    1230-220
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students

    An exploration of the philosophies which have shaped the Black Liberation Movement, the Feminist Movement and the Gay Rights Movement in the United States. We will begin by looking at the ideological roots of these movements in earlier centuries then trace their development through their 20th century manifestations. Similarities and differences in these social theories will be analyzed along with the historical contexts in which they were and are invoked. We will also consider the political ramifications of utilizing particular paradigms to argue for social change.

    COURSE OBJECTIVES:
    To provide an overview of the sociopolitical philosophies which underlie the Feminist, African/American, and Gay movements in the United States.
    To situate these paradigms in their historical context.
    To assess which theories, concepts and arguments transcend the particular features of the individual movements and apply across their differences and which do not.
    To develop the students' ability to analyze, formulate and defend theory.
    To assist students in examining their own sociopolitical beliefs and goals.

    REQUIRED TEXTS:
    Black Power Ideologies, John McCartney
    Readings Packets (available at Prof. Copy, 42nd & U. Way)

    COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
    - Class participation (30%): Be present and prepared for discussion. This means having each day's readings completed by class time and coming with some ideas about them and about any assigned questions. Participation includes both thoughtful comments and active, respectful listening and an appropriate balance between them. One absence is permitted without affecting your participation grade.
    - Weekly response papers (30%): Each week questions or topics related to the readings will be given on which you will write approximately 2 typewritten pages. Graded credit/no-credit.
    - Group project (15%): Guidelines to be announced.
    - Final exam (take-home essay) (25%)

  • Honors 394 B: Animal Planet: Food, Development and Activism in Global Perspective (VLPA / I&S)
    SLN 14744 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Maria Elena Garcia (CHID, JSIS)
    Office: B102 Padelford Hall, Box 354300
    Phone: 206 221-0561
    meg71@u.washington.edu
    WF
    1030-1220
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 20 students

    Recent years have seen an increase in interest about food politics: how it is produced, where it comes from, how it intersects with class and racial inequality, childhood obesity, and climate change among many other issues. Yet recent scholarship on and activism around food very often ignores the centrality of non-human animals. This course will focus on the place of animals in transnational economies of food and development programs. We will also explore the global movement for animal rights and welfare, and challenge the notion that concern over the plight of "food" (and other) animals is limited to the "developed" world.

    Course Requirements and Assignments

    - Active participation during seminar and weekly reading responses
    - Weblog Assignment (to be included in Honors Portfolio)
    - Collaborative report and presentation on industrial agriculture in Brazil, China, Ethiopia, or India
    - Short position paper on animal-related policy issue

  • Honors 394 C: Teaching to Transgress: A Teaching Workshop (VLPA / I&S)
    SLN 14745 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Frances McCue (Writer in Residence, UW Honors)
    frances@francesmccue.com
    MW
    1030-1220
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    Do you ever find yourself in situations where you would like to teach something to someone else? Do Powerpoint and Prezi only go so far? How might you imagine new scenarios to help other people learn? This class will be a series of teaching practice sessions, interspersed with great literature from education and reflective writing.

    Many theorists believe that social change begins inside classrooms, or in transforming classrooms into spaces where students take charge of their learning. How can we re-imagine notions of "school" and "expert" to open new ways of exchanging information and power? Together, we'll envision some utopian scenarios of ideal learning communities. Then, we'll work with realistic "case studies" or "portraits" that ask us to teach in difficult situations. This class will be a lively, hands on, on-your-feet atmosphere in which you will begin the journey of becoming a teacher- whether that teaching happens in classrooms, workplaces or in your community.

  • Honors 394 D: Exploring the Power of Music (VLPA / I&S)
    SLN 14746 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Deborah Pierce (Libraries Odegaard Undergraduate Library)

    Phone: 206 543-4425
    dpierce@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    130-320
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 15 students

    usic can be heard all over our planet. It finds its place in the chants of a shaman healing their patient, accompanies television commercials to help sell a product, helps create an atmosphere at social events, and accompanies societal rites of passage. Its inspiration can also be found in nature, for example, as a bird singing in our back yard or in the Amazon rainforest. Academically, music weaves its magic into many fields, making it an interdisciplinary powerhouse. It is present from the hard sciences through the most esoteric arts. Examples include recording technology in engineering; the use of music for healing in medicine and psychology; the study of sound production and building of musical instruments in physics; copyright and performance rights in law; and its use as a teaching aid in education.

    In this experiential course we will examine some of the universal themes emerging from the use of music and its influence on humanity and our world. Our ten week journey will utilize various lenses through which we will explore the topic, including scientific and academic research, observation of collective human experience, and your own personal experience both in and outside of class. Our time together will be partially modeled on the goals and objectives of collaborative teaching/learning communities. Activities will include class visits from guest experts and group and individual research opportunities along with weekly musical explorations facilitated by the instructor. During this process we will also examine how it affects and empowers our own lives.

  • INFO 101 AE: Social Networking
    SLN 15124 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Bob Boiko (iSchool)

    Phone: 206 616-4030
    bboiko@uw.edu
    TTh
    330-450
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 23 students

    Students must also register for INFO 101 A lecture (SLN 15119). See Time Schedule for day/time information.

    Explores today's most popular social networks, gaming applications, and messaging applications. Examines technologies, social implications, and information structure. Focuses on logic, databases, networked delivery, identity, access privacy, ecommerce, organization, and retrieval.

  • BIOC 441 AD: Honors Biochemistry (NW)
    SLN 11176 (View Time Schedule info »)

    William Parson (Biochemistry)
    Office: J-061C Health Sciences, Box 357350
    Phone: 206 543-1743
    parsonb@u.washington.edu
    W
    230-320
    Credits: 4
    Limit: 30 students

    Add codes available from Biochem dept. Contact advisers@chem.washington.edu for information.
    BIOC 441 Honors section. Students must also register for Bioc 441 A lecture (SLN 11172). See Time Schedule for lecture day/time information.

    Biochemistry and molecular biology (with quiz sections) for undergraduate students in molecular and cellular biology, for biochemistry majors, and graduate students in other science departments.

  • CHEM 155 A: Honors General Chemistry (NW)
    SLN 11999 (View Time Schedule info »)

    MWF
    230-320
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 72 students

    Add codes available through Chemistry dept.
    Prerequisite: 2.2 in Honors CHEM 145.
    Students must also sign up for Section AA, AB, or AC. See Time Schedule for day/time information.

    Continuation of CHEM 145. Includes laboratory. Together CHEM 145 and 155 cover material in CHEM 142, 152, and 162. No more than the number of credits indicated can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: CHEM 152, 155 (5 credits); 145, 155, 162 (10 credits).

  • CHEM 336 A: Honors Organic Chemistry (NW)
    SLN 12130 (View Time Schedule info »)

    MWThF
    1030-1120
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 72 students

    Add codes available through Chemistry dept.
    Prerequisite: 2.2 in Honors CHEM 335.

    For chemistry majors and otherwise qualified students planning three or more quarters of organic chemistry. Structure, nomenclature, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Theory and mechanism of organic reactions. Studies of biomolecules. No more than 4 credits can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: CHEM 238, CHEM 336.

  • CSE 142: Computer Programming I (NW)
    SLN ?

    Stuart Reges (Computer Science & Engineering)
    Office: Allen Center, Room 552, Box 352350
    Phone: 206 685-9138
    reges@cs.washington.edu
    Credits: 5

    Student may register for either CSE 142 A or B and corresponding sections. To earn Honors credit, students must also register for 1 additional credit of CSE 390. Instructor will give details on registration for CSE 390 during week 1.

    See Time Schedule for course day, time and SLN.

    Basic programming-in-the-small abilities and concepts including procedural programming (methods, parameters, return values), basic control structures (sequence, if/else, for loop, while loop), file processing, arrays and an introduction to defining objects.

  • CSE 143: Computer Programming II (NW)
    SLN ?

    Hélène Martin (Computer Science & Engineering)

    Credits: 5

    Student may register for either CSE 143 A or B and corresponding sections. To earn Honors credit, students must also register for 1 additional credit of CSE 390. Instructor will give details on registration for CSE 390 during week 1.

    See Time Schedule for course day, time and SLN.

    Continuation of CSE 142. Concepts of data abstraction and encapsulation including stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, recursion, instruction to complexity and use of predefined collection classes. Prerequisite: CSE 142.

  • Honors 221 A: Evolution & Human Behavior (NW)
    SLN 14738 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Jon Herron (Biology)
    Office: 205D Burke Museum, Box 351800
    Phone: (206) 547-6330
    herronjc@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    1030-1220
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students

    The theory of evolution by natural selection is the underlying theme that unites all fields of biology. In this course we will cover the basic principles of evolution, explore ways in which evolutionary theory can be applied to human biology and behavior, and consider how evolutionary thinking might guide the development of social policy. We will consider questions such as these:

    -Why are women and men different?
    -Which is more egalitarian: monogamy or polygamy?
    -Why do step-parents and step-children often have more conflicted relationships than biological parents and biological children?
    -When do people cooperate, when are they selfish, and why?
    -What can we do to reduce the rate of spousal abuse and homicide?

    My goal is to help students learn selection thinking; that is, to help them learn to reason like evolutionary biologists. I hope to help students pose questions, formulate hypotheses, design experiments, and critically evaluate the quality of evidence. After taking this course, students will be able to:

    -Apply evolutionary theory to human interactions, especially those involving social conflict, and make predictions about how the divergent interests of the parties involved will affect their behavior.
    -Design observational studies and experiments to test these predictions.
    -Interpret and critically evaluate graphs and tables showing data on behavioral patterns in humans and animals.
    -Provide evolutionary interpretations of various human social institutions, such as laws, wills, and social policies.

  • Honors 221 B: Evolution & Human Behavior (NW)
    SLN 14739 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Jon Herron (Biology)
    Office: 205D Burke Museum, Box 351800
    Phone: (206) 547-6330
    herronjc@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    1230-220
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students

    The theory of evolution by natural selection is the underlying theme that unites all fields of biology. In this course we will cover the basic principles of evolution, explore ways in which evolutionary theory can be applied to human biology and behavior, and consider how evolutionary thinking might guide the development of social policy. We will consider questions such as these:

    -Why are women and men different?
    -Which is more egalitarian: monogamy or polygamy?
    -Why do step-parents and step-children often have more conflicted relationships than biological parents and biological children?
    -When do people cooperate, when are they selfish, and why?
    -What can we do to reduce the rate of spousal abuse and homicide?

    My goal is to help students learn selection thinking; that is, to help them learn to reason like evolutionary biologists. I hope to help students pose questions, formulate hypotheses, design experiments, and critically evaluate the quality of evidence. After taking this course, students will be able to:

    -Apply evolutionary theory to human interactions, especially those involving social conflict, and make predictions about how the divergent interests of the parties involved will affect their behavior.
    -Design observational studies and experiments to test these predictions.
    -Interpret and critically evaluate graphs and tables showing data on behavioral patterns in humans and animals.
    -Provide evolutionary interpretations of various human social institutions, such as laws, wills, and social policies.

  • Honors 221 C: Climate Extremes (NW)
    SLN 14740 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Paul Quay (Oceanography)
    Office: 417 Ocean Science Bldg, Box 355351
    Phone: 206 685-8061
    pdquay@u.washington.edu
    Paul Johnson (Oceanography)
    Office: 256 Marine Science Bldg, Box 357940
    Phone: 206 543-8474
    johnson@ocean.washington.edu
    MWThF
    1130-1220
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 15 students

    Cross-listed with OCEAN 450 A.

    This course examines the earth's past for evidence of extreme climate conditions in order to better understand possible future climate changes. Conditions that occurred during the Neo-Proterozoic (Snowball Earth: 750 to 550 million years ago), the Cretaceous Hothouse (100 million years ago, and Pleistocene Icehouse (1 million years ago) will be compared to the Present Greenhouse climate.

    Dramatic changes in the earth's climate has resulted from natural variations in solar insolation, atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, rates of ocean circulation, plate tectonics and volcanic activity, the evolution of vascular plants and, in recent times, the burning of fossil fuels. The impact of these factors on climate, through interactions between the atmosphere, oceans and land, will be discussed. Importantly, the processes that produced past climate changes will be discussed in the context of modern impending climate change.

    One class period per week will be spent in class discussion of an important paper. Problem sets, stressing quantitative solutions, will be given as take home assignments during the quarter.

  • MATH 125 H: Honors Calculus with Analytical Geometry II (NW)
    SLN 16287 (View Time Schedule info »)

    MWF
    1030-1120
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 55 students

    Add codes are available from Math Department.
    Students must have completed Honors Math 124.
    Students must register for section HA or HB. Check Time Schedule for day/time information.

    Second quarter in the calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes integral calculus. Emphasizes applications and problem solving using the tools of calculus.

  • MATH 135 A: Accelerated (Honors) Calculus (NW)
    SLN 16328 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Thomas Duchamp (Mathematics)
    Office: 505C Padelford, Box 354350
    Phone: 206 543-1724
    duchamp@math.washington.edu
    MTWThF
    1030-1120
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 35 students

    Add code available from Math Department only, C-36 Padelford.
    Students must have completed Honors MATH 134.

    Covers the material of MATH 124, 125, 126; 307, 308, 318. First year of a two-year accelerated sequence. May receive advanced placement (AP) credit for 125 after taking 135. For students with above average preparation, interest, and ability in mathematics.

  • MATH 335 A: Accelerated (Honors) Advanced Calculus (NW)
    SLN 16371 (View Time Schedule info »)

    James Morrow (Mathematics)
    Office: C439 Padelford, Box 354350
    Phone: 206 543-1161
    morrow@math.washington.edu
    MTWThF
    1030-1120
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 35 students

    Add code available from Math Department only, C-36 Padelford.
    Students must have completed Honors MATH 334.

    Introduction to proofs and rigor; uniform convergence, Fourier series and partial differential equations, vector calculus, complex variables. Students who complete this sequence are not required to take MATH 309, 324, 326, 327, 328, and 427. Second year of an accelerated two-year sequence; prepares students for senior-level mathematics courses. Prerequisite: 2.0 in MATH 334.

  • PHYS 122 B: Honors Electromagnetism and Oscillatory Motion (NW)
    SLN 18236 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Aurel Bulgac (Physics)
    Office: B478 Physics-Astronomy Bldg., Box 351560
    Phone: 206 685-2988
    bulgac@uw.edu
    MWF
    930-1020
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 66 students

    Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 122 quiz section and lab required. See Time Schedule for section & lab info.

    Contact Prof. Bulgac (bulgac@phys.washington.edu) to register.

    Basic principles of electromagnetism, the mechanics of oscillatory motion, and experiments in these topics for physical science and engineering majors. Lecture tutorial and lab components must all be taken to receive credit. Credit is not given for both PHYS 115 and PHYS 122.

  • GEOG 331 AD: Global Poverty and Care (I&S)
    SLN 14486 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Victoria Lawson (Geography)
    Phone: 543-5196
    lawson@u.washington.edu
    F
    1130-1220
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 18 students

    Students must also register for GEOG 331A lecture (SLN 14482). See Time Schedule for day/time information.

    Add code required. Available as of October 29 in MGH 211.

    Explores the causes and patterns of global poverty, and the urgent need for studies of care in both academic work and public policy. Considers the possibilities and challenges of caring across distance, and ways to respectfully engage with people in different places.

    Please note this class links up with GH 101 'Introduction to Global Health: Disparities, Determinants, Policies and Outcomes'. Students are encouraged, but not required, to enroll in both.

  • Honors 231 A: Encounters in the Heart of Darkness (I&S)
    SLN 14741 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Clarke Speed (Anthropology)

    landogo@u.washington.edu
    MW
    1130-120
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 40 students

    This Honors course rethinks Conrad's classic work on Western domination and appropriation via the violence of human difference. Our focus is less with the violent path of Kurtz, but with the strange liminal narratives of Marlow. What happens with the stranger in a strange land who stays and eventually returns home? What has changed? Using actual Honors student experiences and hopes, we rethink the complex world of encounter without privilege. Using concepts from Heidegger, Buber, and Levinas, we turn the soil of personhood and identity found lurking in an I-it-world. As we turn this 'soil' of difference we find unresolvable difference, translation gaps, and conscious violence. Such soil privileges no one. Seeking practical and hopeful re-application, we look to a range of spaces in tourism and travel, extended travel,study abroad and exploration seminars, but also research, mission, mercenary, development, disaster relief, and religious pilgrimage spaces. Given these asymmetries of participation, we develop a theologically agnostic language of human co-evalness where co-presence - an otherwise than Western Being - finds and sustains human dignity. Reading includes Conrad, Buber, Levinas, and Kingsolver. As a Socratic dialogue, there is no right answer or single Truth, only multiple truths and answers in complex environments. Student evaluation includes two short Concept papers, two rewrites, and a final Accumulation Paper. Other foundation work includes student precis and presentation, visual work, etymologies and word work, and use of endnotes. All are found in an integrated portfolio due at the end of the quarter. There is something here for everyone, but this course is foundation for all past and future Study Abroad students.

  • Honors 231 B: Conflict, Crime and War in the 21st Century (I&S)
    SLN 20623 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Stephen Sulzbacher (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences)
    Office: Children's Hospital & Medical Center, Box 359300
    Phone: 206 987-2164
    sis@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    1030-1220
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 15 students

    In this seminar, we will study how our government works to protect your individual and national security. We will ask, "Who are the true enemies and adversaries of the USA in the coming century?" We will analyze how our National Security Council combats terrorist and transnational crime organizations. To do this requires a look at the historical concepts of war and justice. We will review how corruption started in biblical times and trace the evolution of identity as a key variable in today's conflicts. Then we will use a "real time" strategy game (Peacemakergame.com) to practice conflict resolution scenarios. Through assigned readings in the primary text, we will discuss the nexus of terrorist organizations and transnational criminal organizations ("mafias") and use in-class exercises to understand the problems they pose. We can then look to the future of cybercrime and cyberwarfare.

    Primary text: "McMafia" by Misha Glenny (New York: Knopf, 2008, ISBN 978-1-4000-4411-5).

    The course is organized around 5 topic modules:

    1) Identity, gang & tribal membership- Understanding who you are and how you see things.

    2) Identity and the Middle East- study peacemaking in a virtual gaming exercise.

    3) How corruption, crime & terrorism come together: what should the "rules of engagement" be that guide America's response to these threats?

    4) Drugs, guns and money: how criminals clean dirty money and terrorists raise clean money for dirty deeds.

    5) Develop an understanding of how the US government (the President and the National Security Council) conducts its "war on terror" and "war on drugs," and how we are evolving strategies for the changing nature of these threats in the 21st Century. In this Honors seminar we will practice advising the President on such actions through the National Security Council.

  • JSIS 201 AH: The Making of the 21st Century (I&S)
    SLN 15342 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Joel Migdal (International Studies)
    migdal@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    1130-1220
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 20 students

    Must be concurrently enrolled in JSIS 201 A (SLN 15334).

    COURSE FULL. Visit MGH 211 to be added to waitlist.

    Provides a historical understanding of the twentieth century and major global issues today. Focuses on interdisciplinary social science theories, methods, and information relating to global processes and on developing analytical and writing skills to engage complex questions of causation and effects of global events and forces.

    SIS 201 is intended to prepare students to think critically about the world and formulate their own ideas about important international issues. The course covers the major events and trends of the twentieth century, including the world wars and the Cold War, decolonization, democratization, and approaches to economic development; and current issues that stem from twentieth-century processes, such as globalization, failed states, the "war on terror," and changes in the international distribution of power.

    COURSE OBJECTIVES:
    Learn to think critically about complex issues and identify connections between events
    Write an analytical paper that formulates a causal argument about political or social phenomena

    METHOD OF INSTRUCTION:
    Lecture 3 times a week, plus two sections a week.

    RECOMMENDED PREPARATION:
    Reading a newspaper daily.

    COURSE ASSIGNMENTS & GRADING:
    Reading of 150-200 pages per week, several short papers and a longer research paper.
    Several short papers, one research paper, class participation, final exam.

  • Honors 398 A: Experiencing Music: The Seattle Symphony (VLPA)
    SLN 14747 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Ileana Marin (Comparative Literature)

    Phone: 206 632-9865
    marini@u.washington.edu
    Claudia Jensen (Slavic Languages & Literature)
    cjensen@uw.edu
    TTh
    130-250
    Credits: 3, c/nc
    Limit: 20 students

    Please note: this course does not fulfill requirements in the Interdisciplinary Honors Core. For pre-2012 College Honors students, this course can satisfy your Seminar requirement.

    How do we experience live music? What have writers, philosophers, and artists said about its power? This experiential learning course will introduce students to the Winter 2013 season at the Seattle Symphony. Students will complete readings and short writing assignments over the quarter, based on their attendance at a series of pre-selected concerts held at roughly two-week intervals throughout the quarter. We will also engage with musicians and other artistic staff at Benaroya Hall for their insights into programming, performance, and other topics.

    The concerts and dates are as follows (and note that students will be required to attend at least five of the six scheduled concerts; the bonus concert can be used as a make-up if necessary). The cost will be $12 per concert and each student will be asked to sign up for the Symphony's Campus Club on line. We will collect funds on the first day of class. NOTE that we are still in the process of making arrangements about ticket purchases; feel free to contact Claudia Jensen (cjensen@uw.edu) if you have questions or concerns about paying for the tickets.

    The concerts are as follows:

    1. Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013 (Stravinskii, Suite from Pulcinella; Mendelssohn, Piano Concerto No. 1; Mozart, Symphony No. 39)

    2. Tuesday, Jan. 22 (a piano recital by Nobuyuki Tsujii featuring Debussy and Chopin, held in the recital hall upstairs at Benaroya; this concert is still somewhat uncertain due to the smaller venue)

    3. Thursday, Jan. 31 (Messiaen, Turangalîla Symphony, with a pre-concert gamelan performance and a presentation during the concert to explain this work; it uses an early electronic instrument called an ondes Martinot)

    4. Thursday, Feb. 14 (Fauré, Suite from Pelléas et Mélisande; Mozart, Piano Concerto No. 21; Ravel, Schéhérazade; Szymanowski, Symphony 4)

    Bonus Concert! Friday, Feb. 15 (this is an intimate late-night concert featuring a couple of very recent works and also a performance of the Schoenberg Pierrot Lunaire song cycle, for its 100th anniversary; the concert starts at 10 pm, in the lobby of the main hall, so it will be an up close and personal experience. We'll discuss the specifics of this concert later.)

    5. Thursday, Feb. 28 (early works by Mozart, including his Flute Concerto)

    6. Thursday, March 14 (Elgar, Enigma Variations; Tippett, Ritual Dances from The Midsummer Marriage; Bruch, Violin Concerto No. 1)

    There will be no final exam, although students will write a final short essay summarizing their experiences. All writing will be appropriate for the Honors portfolio.

  • Honors 496 A: Honors Core Integration
    SLN 14748 (View Time Schedule info »)

    James Clauss (UW Honors, Classics)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
    Phone: 221-6075
    jjc@u.washington.edu
    Julie Villegas (UW Honors)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
    Phone: 543-7172
    villegas@u.washington.edu
    M
    330-420
    Credits: 1
    Limit: 15 students

    For Interdisciplinary Honors students only. Students must have completed 6/9 Honors Core courses and 1/2 Experiential Learning projects. To register, email laurah13@uw.edu. Minimum enrollment of 5 needed by 12/14/12 to offer this course.

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