Course Archives

  • ARCH 351 C: Romanesque, Gothic, and Renaissance Architecture
    SLN 10299 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Katrina Deines (Architecture)
    Office: 208-N Gould Hall, Box 355660
    Phone: 206 685-8455
    deines@u.washington.edu
    MWF
    F
    9:30-10:20
    11:30-12:20
    ARCH 147
    ARCH 140
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 18 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    This course presents a survey of architecture from about 750 to about 1789. Examples are drawn from the traditions of Western and Islamic architecture during the periods usually termed the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the Baroque, with particular interest in the formation of and interaction between these traditions.

  • ART 141 A: Honors Basic Photography
    SLN 10366 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Laurel Schultz (Art)
    laures@u.washington.edu
    MW
    8:30-11:20
    ART 116
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 20 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Digital camera with a minimum 3 Megapixel capacity and 512 MB memory card is required.

    Introduction to theory, techniques, and processes of still photography. Projects stress the visual and creative potential of the medium.

    Please IGNORE the camera requirement description in the Official course description (http://www.washington.edu/students/crscat/art.html#art140). ART 140 is an introduction to the theory, techniques and processes of still photography with a DIGITAL CAMERA, which IS required. Course content will emphasize photography's potential for self-expression and creative problem solving in an artistic context. Image output will include digital prints and on-line presentation.

    Course content will be delivered through slide lectures, demonstrations, field trips, workshops, discussion, work reviews and consultations. Lab work will be largely comprised of digital image processing and basic on-line presentation.

    Please note: a digital camera with a minimum 3 Megapixel capacity and 512 MB memory card is required. Digital cameras are also available for check-out from CSC in Kane Hall. You will spend approximately $50 on printing your images; commercial printing facilities will be utilized.

    CLASS ASSIGNMENTS & GRADING
    Each student will complete photographic projects (both on-line and in print form), submit a written review and participate in group reviews. Each assignment is designed to stimulate consideration of a specific conceptual approach but may be realized with a range of creative solutions.

    Assessment is ongoing throughout the quarter. Regular group reviews of your photographic assignments are a valuable and essential component of this class. Evaluation will be based upon the conceptual development / adventurousness of your ideas and technical progress.

    In addition to the merit of your photographic work, assessment will also be based upon your level of contribution to discussion, your written review and your on-line contributions as reflections of engagement and critical thinking.

    Also, refer to the School of Art guidelines for assessment criteria, which will be handed out in class.

  • Honors 252 A: Comparative Ideologies: Human Rights Movements
    SLN 14153 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Clare Bright (Gender Studies (GWSS))
    Office: B-110 Padelford, Box 354345
    Phone: (206) 543-6900
    cbright@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    12:30-2:20
    SMI 407
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    An exploration of the philosophies which have shaped the Black Liberation Movement, the Feminist Movement and the Gay Rights Movement in the United States. We will begin by looking at the ideological roots of these movements in earlier centuries then trace their development through their 20th century manifestations. Similarities and differences in these social theories will be analyzed along with the historical contexts in which they were and are invoked. We will also consider the political ramifications of utilizing particular paradigms to argue for social change.

    COURSE OBJECTIVES:
    To provide an overview of the sociopolitical philosophies which underlie the Feminist, African/American, and Gay movements in the United States.
    To situate these paradigms in their historical context.
    To assess which theories, concepts and arguments transcend the particular features of the individual movements and apply across their differences and which do not.
    To develop the students' ability to analyze, formulate and defend theory.
    To assist students in examining their own sociopolitical beliefs and goals.

    REQUIRED TEXTS:
    Black Power Ideologies, John McCartney
    Readings Packets (available at Prof. Copy, 42nd & U. Way)

    COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
    Class participation (30%): Be present and prepared for discussion. This means having each day's readings completed by class time and coming with some ideas about them and about any assigned questions. Participation includes both thoughtful comments and active, respectful listening and an appropriate balance between them. One absence is permitted without affecting your participation grade.

    Weekly response papers (30%): Each week questions or topics related to the readings will be given on which you will write approximately 2 typewritten pages. Graded credit/no-credit.

    Group project (15%): Guidelines to be announced.

    Final exam (take-home essay) (25%)

  • Honors 252 B: From Socrates to Rosa Parks: Historical and Moral Development of Dissent
    SLN 14154 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Taso Lagos (International Studies)
    Office: 400 Thomson Hall, Box 353650
    Phone: (206) 543-4370
    taso@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    9:30-11:20
    MGH 251
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 35 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Why do some individuals take it upon themselves to stand up against society, in the process being ostracized, losing jobs, being jailed, or, worse, dying? What is it about western society that makes dissent possible and even perhaps necessary? This survey class looks at the issue of dissent through the eyes of selected individuals (Socrates, Machiavelli, Jonathan Swift, Woodrow Wilson and Rosa Parks) to determine what elemental force dissent plays on the development of democracy and human morality. This class will involve extensive reading, class discussion, mock trials, a research paper involving the "New York Times" and regular "thought papers." Challenging but rewarding. We close the class with a special event in Red Square.

    **Office hours will be held in the Honors Lib every Friday from 1:30-3:00**

  • Honors 252 C: Philosophy of Religion
    SLN 14155 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Ken Clatterbaugh (Philosophy)
    Office: 345B Savery, Box 353350
    Phone: (206) 543-5086
    clatter@u.washington.edu
    MW
    11:30-1:20
    MGH 287
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Philosophy and religion especially in Western thought have grown up together. Philosophy has provided many of the concepts that are used in religious conversation to talk about God, evil, salvation, etc. However, the relationship between philosophy and religion has not always been amicable. Philosophy's dependence on reason, careful distinction, and evidential justification has often been in conflict with religion's emphasis on faith and acceptance of the supernatural. As a result of this long relationship, there are a number of problems in philosophy of religion that have been discussed and recast in many forms over the years. These issues include: the nature of God, the argument from design, the cosmological argument, the ontological argument, miracles, the nature and value of religious experience, the argument from evil, and how to view the plurality of religious faiths. This course will examine several of these issues in some detail. This course is not a study of comparative religion it focuses on the religions of Abraham, namely, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course will conclude by reading a very recent book on religious conflict, Benjamin J. Kaplan's "Divided by Faith".

    COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
    Each student as part of a team of 3-5 students must take responsibility for one two hour class. The team will present the key arguments in a portion of the reading and offer critique of those arguments. The team shall also facilitate a discussion.

    Each student must submit a prospectus for a terms paper and at the end of the quarter a term paper on an approved topic.

    REQUIRED TEXTS:
    "Philosophy of Religion Selected Readings" 2nd ed. by Peterson, Hasker, Reichenbach, and Basinger.
    "Divided by Faith" by Benjamin J. Kaplan

  • Honors 252 D: Teaching What You Know
    SLN 14156 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Frances McCue (Writer in Residence, UW Honors)
    frances@francesmccue.com
    MW
    10:30-12:20
    MGH 295
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    In what situations is expertise a useful commodity? Does knowledge include the awareness of how to best use it? How do we pass it on?

    In this seminar we'll learn the basics of teaching. We will also use writing as a method to learn how to reflect upon our learning about pedagogy. By practicing different methods of instruction and by reading and writing vigorously about what we're learning, we'll be able to facilitate groups, teach one-to-one, and discuss learning styles. The outcome of this seminar will be for each student to have a developed plan to transmit his or her knowledge to people outside of the university. If possible students should plan on registering for a spring quarter service learning experience.

    BIBLIOGRAPHY: (Required Texts)
    - Jane Addams, Twenty Years at Hull House, New York: Signet, Penguin Putnam, 1961
    - Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed, New York: Continuum, 2000
    - Course Packet: Selections of Eleanor Duckworth, Richard Hugo, Maxine Greene, Mihalyi Cziksentmihalyi, Frances McCue, Billy Collins etc.

  • Honors 262 A: Argumentation and Debate
    SLN 14157 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Matt McGarrity (Communication)
    Office: 102 Communications Bldg, Box 353740
    Phone: 543-7854
    mcgarrit@u.washington.edu
    MW
    1:30-3:20
    MGH 271
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 32 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    This class focuses on written and oral argumentation. After covering some key concepts in argument theory, we will write and perform policy speeches, before ending with team policy debates. Assignments will include: quizzes, short written assignments, papers analyzing public debates, policy speeches, and team policy debates. Though the assignments focus on public policies, the argumentative skills developed in class are transferable to almost any professional realm (law, business, academics, and even science). Students should know that this class will include public speeches and presentations.

    By the end of the course, students should be able to:
    - identify and classify the structural elements of arguments.
    - critique written and spoken arguments.
    - prepare a clear policy speech and present it effectively.
    - build a solid policy case and debate it effectively.

  • Honors 262 B: Marxist Modern? Ethnographic Methods in Violent and Conflicted Worlds
    SLN 14158 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Clarke Speed (Anthropology)

    landogo@u.washington.edu
    MW
    11:30-1:20
    MGH 234
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 35 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    This five credit course assumes Honors students want to seek knowledge in the real conditions, often gritty, dusty, and uncomfortable, of worlds outside of Mary Gates Hall. As an ethnographic methods course, we move past theories of cultural, social, and global integration into the conflicted and violent worlds of formal political hegemony, various kinds of counter-hegemonies, and the resistance and revolts of shadow-hegomonies. We seek the practical ethics of researcher and research in conflicted and violent spaces; especially, where the ethnographer might be at-risk. We use three texts: a primer on doing ethnography by James Spradley, Participant Observation (1980), and two foundational texts on Marxian and Gramscian ethnographic methods by Donald Donham, History, Power, Ideology (1999), and Kate Crehan, Gramsci, Culture and Anthropology(2002). The first five weeks is dedicated to the performance of power in hegemonic theory and method; while the second five is dedicated to ethographic presentations of student generated shadow ethographies. Class requirements include (in cumulative order) - a research abstract, actual research with notebooks on a community distinct from the students 'home world,' an ethnographic presentation of work-in-progress to class, and then a 'ethno-graphic' write up of findings and tentative conclusions. As an ethical Socratic process, this methods class assumes no right answer is possible. The power of persuasion is in the details.

  • Honors 262 C: Science and the Master Narrative
    SLN 14159 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Maynard Olson (Medicine - Genome Sciences)

    mvo@u.washington.edu
    Malcolm Parks (Communications)
    Office: 340C Communications Bldg, Box 353740
    Phone: 206 543-2660
    macp@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    2:30-4:20
    MGH 241
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 18 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    This course can also be taken as Honors 221 D for science credit.

    This course will explore a profound turn in human thought-the emergence of a master scientific narrative of the human experience. In a process that continues to gain momentum from new scientific discoveries, humans have constructed, largely during the past 200 years, a comprehensive story of our physical, biological, and social origins that makes strong claims of universality and objectivity. This story continues to expand with new scientific discoveries. Sometimes it draws upon, but more often it displaces, earlier narrative traditions embedded in human culture. The scientific narrative sweeps across billions of calendar years of history and billions of light years of space to portray contemporary human experience as a tiny speck in the space-time manifold of the universe. We will explore both the content and meaning of this narrative, drawing both on scientific knowledge and the voices of artists, poets, myth, religion, and the full richness of the humanities. We will also explore how science as a narrative may, or may not, enable us to take the "long view" of pressing societal challenges revolving around issues such as technology, population, and climate change.

    OBJECTIVES:
    When students complete this class, they should be able to:
    - Articulate a deep historical context for understanding major current social and environmental trends (e.g., global warming, advancement of technology, population growth, human health, and social structure).
    - Describe current social challenges such as the quests for environmental sustainability, international development, economic and political stability, and racial justice as the result of a chain of human developments and choices stretching back tens of thousands of years.
    - Think creatively rather than judgmentally about how different forms of discourse (e.g., science and religion) coexist and communicate with one another.
    - Describe both science and humanism as cultural narratives.
    - Identify the limits of science and other traditions as sources of a truly universal "master" narrative.

    EXPECTATIONS & ASSIGNMENTS:
    The class will be structured as lecture/discussion. Readings will include a substantial text, David Christian's Maps of Time, as well as a reading packet. Active participation in class discussions is expected. Grades will be based on class participation and a series of short reaction papers (3-5 pages each).

  • Honors 262 D: Terrorism & Global Culture
    SLN 14160 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Stephen Sulzbacher (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences)
    Office: Children's Hospital & Medical Center, Box 359300
    Phone: 206 987-2164
    sis@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    10:30-12:20
    MGH 206
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    This course examines the contemporary use of violence by States and non-state agents. Students will be asked to consider whether Peace is even possible among modern civilizations. We will study the Israeli-Palestinian conflict as a primary example of how local beliefs and metaphors dictate international relations. The course will be structured around a "real time" war gaming and peacemaker lab each week, followed by a weekly lecture. Using foreign media sources, we will try to understand current conflicts in the Middle East from the viewpoint of the insurgent enemy and of the civilian noncombatant.

    Using Afghanistan as a model, we will then study "fixing" health and educational infrastructure in rural and remote villages in regions where the United States is involved in reconstruction. As a course requirement, each student will be expected to develop an actionable plan to address a specific problem facing our Nation in the Middle East or Africa.

    COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
    You will each write a "white paper" of about 20-25 pages on a major global problem. Successive drafts of this paper will be due regularly as the course progress, so you can get constructive feedback from me and your classmates. This project will be 60% of your grade. There will be one quiz on assigned readings about 3/4 of the way through the quarter, worth about 20% of your grade. There will be 2 or 3 one page "briefing outlines" assigned throughout the quarter, accounting for the balance of your grade. Classroom participation also counts. I'm open to pairs collaborating on the major project.

    COURSE OBJECTIVES:
    - Learn analysis and negotiating tactics applicable to small scale and large scale conflicts;
    - Study the history and mythology behind the key players in today's global conflicts;
    - Learn to "see" the conflict as your adversary sees it ;
    - Examine the blinders and filters of your own personal and educational history.

    REQUIRED TEXTS:
    1) Betts, RK. Conflict after the Cold War. New York:Pearson, Longman, 2008.
    2) Ghani, A, Lockhart, C. Fixing Failed States. New York: Oxford, 2008.
    3) Assigned media: "Why not kill them all?" This talk can be viewed at http://www.uwpsychiatry.org/News/GrandRounds.html.
    4) In My Country, starring Samuel L. Jackson, available on DVD.

  • SIS 201 AI: Making of the 21st Century
    SLN 17888 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Jose Lucero (International Studies)

    Phone: 206 616-1643
    jal26@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    1:30-2:20
    SIG 230
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students

    Must be concurrently enrolled in SIS 201 A (SLN 17879).

    Provides a historical understanding of the twentieth century and major global issues today. Focuses on interdisciplinary social science theories, methods, and information relating to global processes and on developing analytical and writing skills to engage complex questions of causation and effects of global events and forces.

    SIS 201 is intended to prepare students to think critically about the world and formulate their own ideas about important international issues. The course covers the major events and trends of the twentieth century, including the world wars and the Cold War, decolonization, democratization, and approaches to economic development; and current issues that stem from twentieth-century processes, such as globalization, failed states, the "war on terror," and changes in the international distribution of power.

    COURSE OBJECTIVES:
    Learn to think critically about complex issues and identify connections between events
    Write an analytical paper that formulates a causal argument about political or social phenomena

    METHOD OF INSTRUCTION:
    Lecture 3 times a week, plus two sections a week.

    RECOMMENDED PREPARATION:
    Reading a newspaper daily.

    COURSE ASSIGNMENTS & GRADING:
    Reading of 150-200 pages per week, several short papers and a longer research paper.
    Several short papers, one research paper, class participation, final exam.

  • SIS 201 AJ: Making of the 21st Century
    SLN 17889 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Jose Lucero (International Studies)

    Phone: 206 616-1643
    jal26@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    11:30-12:20
    LOW 222
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Must be concurrently enrolled in SIS 201 A (SLN 17879).

    Provides a historical understanding of the twentieth century and major global issues today. Focuses on interdisciplinary social science theories, methods, and information relating to global processes and on developing analytical and writing skills to engage complex questions of causation and effects of global events and forces.

    SIS 201 is intended to prepare students to think critically about the world and formulate their own ideas about important international issues. The course covers the major events and trends of the twentieth century, including the world wars and the Cold War, decolonization, democratization, and approaches to economic development; and current issues that stem from twentieth-century processes, such as globalization, failed states, the "war on terror," and changes in the international distribution of power.

    COURSE OBJECTIVES:
    Learn to think critically about complex issues and identify connections between events
    Write an analytical paper that formulates a causal argument about political or social phenomena

    METHOD OF INSTRUCTION:
    Lecture 3 times a week, plus two sections a week.

    RECOMMENDED PREPARATION:
    Reading a newspaper daily.

    COURSE ASSIGNMENTS & GRADING:
    Reading of 150-200 pages per week, several short papers and a longer research paper.
    Several short papers, one research paper, class participation, final exam.

  • BIOC 441 AD: Honors Biochemisty
    SLN 10970 (View Time Schedule info »)

    William Parson (Biochemistry)
    Office: J-061C Health Sciences, Box 357350
    Phone: 206 543-1743
    parsonb@u.washington.edu
    W
    2:30-3:20
    HST T478
    Credits: 4
    Limit: 30 students

    Add codes available from Biochem dept. Contact advisers@chem.washington.edu for information.
    BIOC 441 Honors section. Students must also register for Bioc 441 A lecture (SLN 10966). See Time Schedule for course information.

    Biochemistry and molecular biology (with quiz sections) for undergraduate students in molecular and cellular biology, for biochemistry majors, and graduate students in other science departments.

  • CHEM 155 A: Honors General Chemistry
    SLN 11688 (View Time Schedule info »)

    MWF
    2:30-3:20
    BAG 261
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 72 students

    Add codes available through Chemistry dept.
    Prerequisite: 2.2 in Honors CHEM 145.
    Students must also sign up for Section AA, AB, or AC. See time schedule for course information.

    Continuation of CHEM 145. Includes laboratory. Together CHEM 145 and 155 cover material in CHEM 142, 152, and 162. No more than the number of credits indicated can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: CHEM 152, 155 (5 credits); 145, 155, 162 (10 credits).

  • CHEM 336 A: Honors Organic Chemistry
    SLN 11807 (View Time Schedule info »)

    MWThF
    10:30-11:20
    BAG 261
    Credits: 4
    Limit: 72 students

    Add codes available through Chemistry dept.
    Prerequisite: 2.2 in Honors CHEM 335

    For chemistry majors and otherwise qualified students planning three or more quarters of organic chemistry. Structure, nomenclature, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Theory and mechanism of organic reactions. Studies of biomolecules. No more than 4 credits can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: CHEM 238, CHEM 336.

  • Honors 221 A: Microbial Ecology
    SLN 14149 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Claire Horner-Devine (Aquatic and Fishery Sciences)

    mchd@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    9:30-11:30
    FSH 203
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 12 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Freshmen & Sophomores only.
    Cross-listed with FISH 221A. COFS Honors students should email linm@u to be enrolled. All other Honors students should get entry code from UW Honors.
    Upper division students please email instructor for

    Microbes are the oldest, most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth. In this course students will gain an understanding of the fundamentals of ecology and evolution by exploring the role of microbes in disease, ecosystem functioning and extreme environments. When most people think of microbes they think of one thing - disease. But most microbes do not cause disease; in fact, they are essential for our survival. Microbes exist everywhere, in soil, in water, in air, at the bottom of the oceans, and deep in the earth's crust. And they thrive in environments that we usually think of as deadly, environments such as boiling water, ice, on radioactive substances and in environments without oxygen. In this course, we will learn about some of these amazing creatures and how biologists discover and study them. We will begin with an introduction to the incredible diversity of microbes and methods used to study these communities of tiny organisms. The rest of the quarter will be comprised of three units:

    1) Microbes and disease: We will explore the current understanding of the role that microbial species and communities play in diseases of humans, plants and animals.

    2) Microbes and ecosystems: Next, we will explore the role that microbes play in the functioning of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. We will then examine the impact that anthropogenic changes, such as invasive species and climate change, have on microbial community structure and function.

    3) Early evolution and microbes at the extremes: We will investigate the ability of microorganisms to live in extreme environments such as deep sea vents, geothermal hotsprings, Antarctic ice and possibly on other planets as well as what insights we can gain about early evolution.

    The course will be comprised of lectures, team presentations, discussions and an independent poster project. The readings in this course are key to developing a strong foundation for learning to think like a scientist and for the poster project. Basic microbiology concepts will be covered by selected readings from the textbook "Brock Biology of Microorganisms." Primary literature and secondary source articles (posted on the class website and handed out in class) will provide examples of the state of current research on these topics. Reading discussions will be presented and facilitated by teams of students.

  • Honors 221 B: DNA & Evolution
    SLN 14150 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Jon Herron (Biology)
    Office: 205D Burke Museum, Box 351800
    Phone: (206) 547-6330
    herronjc@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    12:30-2:20
    MGH 228
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 26 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Evolution and genetics are the cornerstones of modern biology. DNA & Evolution will explore these fields in the context of contemporary issues that are important to individuals and societies. Although examples will be drawn from a variety of organisms, the primary emphasis will be on humans. Among the questions we will consider are these: Where did modern humans come from? Why are women and men different? Why do children resemble their parents? Do genes influence variation in personality, intelligence, and sexual orientation? What can genetic analyses reveal about evolutionary history and the relationships among species? Can genetic analyses allow us to predict the evolutionary future? Given what our society knows about evolution and genetics, should we take responsibility for guiding the evolutionary future of human populations?

    Throughout the course the goal will be to help students develop sufficient biological sophistication to understand new discoveries in genetics and evolution, talk to their doctors, and make rational personal and political choices about biological issues. Students will read secondary and primary literature, ask questions, design experiments, analyze and interpret data, and draw their own conclusions.

    Assignments will include essays, problem sets, and computer labs.
    Throughout the course the goal will be to help students develop sufficient biological sophistication to understand new discoveries in genetics and evolution, talk to their doctors, and make rational personal and political choices about biological issues. Students will read secondary and primary literature, ask questions, design experiments, analyze and interpret data, and draw their own conclusions.

    Assignments will include essays, problem sets, and computer labs.

  • Honors 221 C: DNA & Evolution
    SLN 14151 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Jon Herron (Biology)
    Office: 205D Burke Museum, Box 351800
    Phone: (206) 547-6330
    herronjc@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    10:30-12:20
    MGH 228
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 24 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Evolution and genetics are the cornerstones of modern biology. DNA & Evolution will explore these fields in the context of contemporary issues that are important to individuals and societies. Although examples will be drawn from a variety of organisms, the primary emphasis will be on humans. Among the questions we will consider are these: Where did modern humans come from? Why are women and men different? Why do children resemble their parents? Do genes influence variation in personality, intelligence, and sexual orientation? What can genetic analyses reveal about evolutionary history and the relationships among species? Can genetic analyses allow us to predict the evolutionary future? Given what our society knows about evolution and genetics, should we take responsibility for guiding the evolutionary future of human populations?

    Throughout the course the goal will be to help students develop sufficient biological sophistication to understand new discoveries in genetics and evolution, talk to their doctors, and make rational personal and political choices about biological issues. Students will read secondary and primary literature, ask questions, design experiments, analyze and interpret data, and draw their own conclusions.

    Assignments will include essays, problem sets, and computer labs.
    Throughout the course the goal will be to help students develop sufficient biological sophistication to understand new discoveries in genetics and evolution, talk to their doctors, and make rational personal and political choices about biological issues. Students will read secondary and primary literature, ask questions, design experiments, analyze and interpret data, and draw their own conclusions.

    Assignments will include essays, problem sets, and computer labs.

  • Honors 221 D: Science and the Master Narrative
    SLN 14152 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Maynard Olson (Medicine - Genome Sciences)

    mvo@u.washington.edu
    Malcolm Parks (Communications)
    Office: 340C Communications Bldg, Box 353740
    Phone: 206 543-2660
    macp@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    2:30-4:20
    MGH 241
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 17 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    This course can also be taken as Honors 262 C for Civilization credit.

    This course will explore a profound turn in human thought-the emergence of a master scientific narrative of the human experience. In a process that continues to gain momentum from new scientific discoveries, humans have constructed, largely during the past 200 years, a comprehensive story of our physical, biological, and social origins that makes strong claims of universality and objectivity. This story continues to expand with new scientific discoveries. Sometimes it draws upon, but more often it displaces, earlier narrative traditions embedded in human culture. The scientific narrative sweeps across billions of calendar years of history and billions of light years of space to portray contemporary human experience as a tiny speck in the space-time manifold of the universe. We will explore both the content and meaning of this narrative, drawing both on scientific knowledge and the voices of artists, poets, myth, religion, and the full richness of the humanities. We will also explore how science as a narrative may, or may not, enable us to take the "long view" of pressing societal challenges revolving around issues such as technology, population, and climate change.

    OBJECTIVES:
    When students complete this class, they should be able to:
    - Articulate a deep historical context for understanding major current social and environmental trends (e.g., global warming, advancement of technology, population growth, human health, and social structure).
    - Describe current social challenges such as the quests for environmental sustainability, international development, economic and political stability, and racial justice as the result of a chain of human developments and choices stretching back tens of thousands of years.
    - Think creatively rather than judgmentally about how different forms of discourse (e.g., science and religion) coexist and communicate with one another.
    - Describe both science and humanism as cultural narratives.
    - Identify the limits of science and other traditions as sources of a truly universal "master" narrative.

    EXPECTATIONS & ASSIGNMENTS:
    The class will be structured as lecture/discussion. Readings will include a substantial text, David Christian's Maps of Time, as well as a reading packet. Active participation in class discussions is expected. Grades will be based on class participation and a series of short reaction papers (3-5 pages each).

  • Honors 221 E: Climatic Extremes
    SLN 19576 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Paul Johnson (Oceanography)
    Office: 256 Marine Science Bldg, Box 357940
    Phone: 206 543-8474
    johnson@ocean.washington.edu
    Paul Quay (Oceanography)
    Office: 417 Ocean Science Bldg, Box 355351
    Phone: 206 685-8061
    pdquay@u.washington.edu
    MWThF
    11:30-12:20
    OTB 205
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 10 students

    Cross-listed with Ocean 450 (SLN 16489).

    This course examines the earth's past for evidence of extreme climate conditions in order to help understand possible future climate changes. For example, climate conditions that occurred during the Neo-Proterozoic (Snowball Earth: 750 to 550 million years ago), Cretaceous Hothouse (100 million years ago), Pleistocene Icehouse (1 million years ago) will be compared to the Present Greenhouse climate.

    The climate impacts resulting from natural variations in solar insolation, changes in ocean and atmospheric circulation, atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, plate tectonics, evolution of vascular plants will be discussed.

    One class period per week will be spent in an active class discussion of an important paper. There will be weekly take home problem sets that will demonstrate the quantitative application of climate concepts.

    Honors students will be responsible for additional research on a climate-related topic, performed independently with guidance from the instructors. Students will present their research to the class and lead a class discussion on the topic.

    LEARNING GOALS
    - Learn about the major climate changes that occurred on earth in the past.
    - Learn how preserved records climate 'proxies' are used to reconstruct past climate change.
    - Understand key processes and feedbacks in the earth's system that controlled past climate changes.
    - Learn how human activity has perturbed current climate on earth.
    - Examine predictions of likely future climate change.

  • Honors 221 F: Astrobiology: The contribution of extraterrestrial materials like meteorites and comets to the origin of life on Earth
    SLN 19589 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Graciela Matrajt (Astronomy)

    Phone: 206 685-0542
    matrajt@astro.washington.edu
    TTh
    1:30-3:20
    MGH 254
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    How did life arise on Earth ? Is there life elsewhere in the Universe ? If any, is it possible to find/detect it ? The mystery of our origins is a question that has preoccupied humans for millennia. Today, this question remains unanswered, although there are many ideas. In this course we will explore the possible approaches to answer these questions. We will first study the history of the sciences that led to approaching these questions, and the chain of thinking that has guided scientists in the search for the origin of life. This is a new science called Astrobiology and it is based in interdisciplinary studies. We will define life. We will briefly study the life cycle of stars and the formation of the Solar System to understand the physical and chemical constraints to form and maintain an Earthlike planet where life can develop.

    We will then investigate the delivery of organic materials, in particular those molecules that are currently found in life forms, by meteorites and comets. We will learn about the various types of meteorites and we will even handle some. We will learn about comets and we will even look at some cometary particles with a microscope. We will talk about Stardust, the NASA mission that brought cometary particles back to Earth. We will learn which instruments are best and more useful to look for extraterrestrial life, and we will talk about the controversial Martian meteorite in which some people thought they have found evidence of life.

    COURSE OBJECTIVES:
    This course provides an overview of a new multidisciplinary science, Astrobiology, with emphasis on the delivery of organic molecules by comets and asteroids. This course will provide knowledge in chemistry, history of sciences, biochemistry, astronomy, geology, geochemistry and biology. In addition, students will learn about different analytical instruments that scientists use to investigate meteorites, but which can also be used to make research in many other different fields.

    GENERAL METHODS OF INSTRUCTION:
    The class will meet 2 times a week (T,Th) for 2 hours. Each session will be divided in two halves with a short recess. In addition to the lectures, there will be inclass activities:
    a) handle scientific material (rocks, meteorites, observation of diverse samples in optical microscope)
    b) watch educational movies/documentaries related to the topic of that week
    c) visit an on campus laboratory (including an electron microscope, a clean room where extraterrestrial samples are processed, chemistry laboratory, etc).
    d) Discussion of published scientific articles
    Guest lecturers may also participate.

  • Honors 396 A: Discussion Supplement to Biology 220: Thinking like a scientist
    SLN 14162 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Mary Pat Wenderoth (Biology)
    Office: Hitchcock 430A, Box 351800
    Phone: (206) 685-8022
    mpw@u.washington.edu
    M
    12:30-2:20
    MGH 242
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 25 students

    Must be concurrently enrolled in BIOL 220

    We will discuss general models that are fundamental to understanding physiology in animals and plants and apply these models to topics discussed in class, review literature on muscle physiology, discuss current topic in plant physiology and students will prepare a power point talk on a group of plants or animals that live in an extreme environment.

  • Honors 396 B: Discussion Supplement to Biology 200: Thinking like a scientist
    SLN 14163 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Kristy Brady (Biology)
    Office: Development, Outreach, & Communications, Box 351800
    Phone: 685-2185
    kbrady@u.washington.edu
    F
    9:30-11:20
    MGH 206
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 25 students

    Must be concurrently enrolled in BIOL 200

    In this honors section, we explore the topics covered in BIOL200, focusing on current research, controversies and applications. We will not review class or lab material, but will use the week's BIOL200 lectures as a starting point for discussions. A sample of discussions from previous quarters: influenza virus, vaccines and autism, cloning and stem cells, how human cognitive development is affected by gender.

    Weekly readings will be posted on a website, and must be read before class. In class, we'll do group activities, discussions, and short student presentations. Credit is awarded for completing the weekly reading, attending and participating in all sessions, and writing a term paper of about 5 pages (with references). Concurrent registration in BIOL200 is required.

  • Honors 396 C: Discussion Supplement to Biology 200: Thinking like a scientist
    SLN 14164 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Christine Tachibana (Biochemistry)

    Phone: (206) 543-1054
    cxt@u.washington.edu
    Th
    8:30-10:20
    MGH 082A
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 20 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Must be concurrently enrolled in BIOL 200

    In this honors section, we explore the topics covered in BIOL200, focusing on current research, controversies and applications. We will not review class or lab material, but will use the week's BIOL200 lectures as a starting point for discussions. A sample of discussions from previous quarters: influenza virus, vaccines and autism, cloning and stem cells, how human cognitive development is affected by gender.

    Weekly readings will be posted on a website, and must be read before class. In class, we'll do group activities, discussions, and short student presentations. Credit is awarded for completing the weekly reading, attending and participating in all sessions, and writing a term paper of about 5 pages (with references). Concurrent registration in BIOL200 is required.

  • Honors 396 D: Discussion Supplement to Biology 200: Thinking like a scientist
    SLN 14165 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Christine Tachibana (Biochemistry)

    Phone: (206) 543-1054
    cxt@u.washington.edu
    Th
    10:30-12:20
    MGH 082A
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 20 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Must be concurrently enrolled in BIOL 200

    In this honors section, we explore the topics covered in BIOL200, focusing on current research, controversies and applications. We will not review class or lab material, but will use the week's BIOL200 lectures as a starting point for discussions. A sample of discussions from previous quarters: influenza virus, vaccines and autism, cloning and stem cells, how human cognitive development is affected by gender.

    Weekly readings will be posted on a website, and must be read before class. In class, we'll do group activities, discussions, and short student presentations. Credit is awarded for completing the weekly reading, attending and participating in all sessions, and writing a term paper of about 5 pages (with references). Concurrent registration in BIOL200 is required.

  • MATH 125 H: Honors Calculus with Analytic Geometry II
    SLN 15322 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Matthew Conroy (Mathematics)
    Office: C-544 Padelford, Box 354350
    Phone: 206 543-7746
    conroy@math.washington.edu
    MWF
    10:30-11:20
    GWN 201
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 50 students

    Add codes are available from Math Department.
    Students must have completed Honors Math 124.
    Students must register for section HA or HB. Check Time Schedule for section information.

    Second quarter in the calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes integral calculus. Emphasizes applications and problem solving using the tools of calculus.

  • MATH 135 A: Accelerated (Honors) Calculus
    SLN 15349 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Thomas Duchamp (Mathematics)
    Office: 505C Padelford, Box 354350
    Phone: 206 543-1724
    duchamp@math.washington.edu
    MTWThF
    10:30-11:20
    MLR 316
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 35 students

    Add code available from Math Department only.
    Students must have completed Honors MATH 134.

    Covers the material of MATH 124, 125, 126; 307, 308, 318. First year of a two-year accelerated sequence. May receive advanced placement (AP) credit for 125 after taking 135. For students with above average preparation, interest, and ability in mathematics.

  • MATH 335: Accelerated (Honors) Advanced Calculus
    SLN 15386 (View Time Schedule info »)

    James Morrow (Mathematics)
    Office: C439 Padelford, Box 354350
    Phone: 206 543-1161
    morrow@math.washington.edu
    MWF
    TTh
    10:30-11:20
    10:30-11:20
    LOW 219
    SIG 230
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    Add code available from Math Department only.
    Students must have completed Honors MATH 334.

    Introduction to proofs and rigor; uniform convergence, Fourier series and partial differential equations, vector calculus, complex variables. Students who complete this sequence are not required to take MATH 309, 324, 326, 327, 328, and 427. Second year of an accelerated two-year sequence; prepares students for senior-level mathematics courses. Prerequisite: 2.0 in MATH 334.

  • PHYS 122 B: Honors Electromagnetism and Oscillatory Motion
    SLN 17186 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Paula Heron (Physics)
    Office: C208B Physics-Astronomy Bldg., Box 351560
    Phone: 206 543-3894
    pheron@phys.washington.edu
    MWF
    9:30-10:20
    PAA A110
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 66 students

    Contact Prof. Heron at pheron@uw.edu for add code.
    Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 122 quiz section and lab required. See time schedule for section & lab info.

    Basic principles of electromagnetism, the mechanics of oscillatory motion, and experiments in these topics for physical science and engineering majors. Lecture tutorial and lab components must all be taken to receive credit. Credit is not given for both PHYS 115 and PHYS 122.

  • Honors 350 A: Thinking for the Future: Foreign Policy 2050
    SLN 14161 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Stephen Sulzbacher (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences)
    Office: Children's Hospital & Medical Center, Box 359300
    Phone: 206 987-2164
    sis@u.washington.edu
    Tu
    1:30-3:20
    MGH 211B
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 10 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    There are psychological and sociological mechanisms which dictate the life cycle of insurgent/terrorist movements. The same principles explain the rise and fall of democracies and authoritarian regimes. In this seminar we will study commonalities among the ruling clique of Russia, the Israeli armed forces, the Chiricahua Apache, al Qaeda, Cosa Nostra and the child soldiers of Sierra Leone. Understanding these sociological/psychological forces can help us predict the true adversaries of the US for the 21st Century.

    The class will then examine/develop innovative practices in education, agriculture, trade and microfinance (we will also study Islamic Shari'a finance) which should be incorporated into development and reconstruction efforts in 3rd world countries. We will identify and study situations where such innovative practices have succeeded in countering the growth of terrorist groups.

    COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
    You will each prepare a "white paper" on a reconstruction strategy of your choosing. We will discuss successive drafts of this paper in class, in the model of a "think tank.", so you can get constructive feedback from me and your classmates. There may be a quiz on assigned readings about half way thru the quarter. There may be 2 or 3 one page "briefing outlines" assigned throughout the quarter. Classroom participation clearly also counts. I'm open to pairs collaborating on the major project.

    REQUIRED TEXTS:
    1) Post, JM. The Mind of the Terrorist. New York:Palgrave, Macmillan, 2007.
    2) Sageman, M. Leaderless Jihad. Philadelphia: Univ.of Pennsylvania Press, 2008.
    3) http://blogs.cgdev.org/open_book/ - a virtual book on microfinance.
    4) Optional ref: Nacos, BL. Terrorism and Counterterrorism. New York:Pearson, Longman, 2008.

  • Honors 350 C: Travel Writing for Travelers
    SLN 19590 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Shawn Wong (English)
    Office: A503 Padelford Hall, Box 354330
    Phone: (206) 543-6201
    homebase@u.washington.edu
    W
    2:30-4:20
    MGH 295
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 20 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Whether you're going on a study abroad trip, preparing for your Bonderman Travel Fellowship or just imagining the places you will visit, this course will provide you with some writing strategies for recording what your camera can't capture.

    Facts, statistics, dates are quickly forgotten; images are not soon forgotten. Your job as a traveling writer/student is to collect and record images. Vivian Gornick writes in The Situation and the Story, "A memoir is a work of sustained narrative prose controlled by an idea of the self under obligation to lift from the raw material of life a tale that will shape experience, transform event, deliver wisdom. Truth in a memoir is achieved when the reader comes to believe that the writer is working hard to engage with the experience at hand. What happened to the writer is not what matters; what matters is the large sense that the writer is able to make of what happened. For that the power of writing imagination is required. As V.S. Pritchett once said of the genre, 'It's all in the art. You get no credit for living.'"

    The author Susan Cahill in her book, The Smiles of Rome, states, "Travel and tourism...follow different rhythms. Travel means finding yourself through a journey, and letting it change you. Tourism means making a journey with enough cushioning and filtering and microscheduling to assure that it won't change you." In Paul Bowles' novel, The Sheltering Sky, one character asks another, "Are you a tourist or a traveler?" One function of travel writing is to record how the experience changes you, the others around you, and your view of the world.

    Shawn Wong teaches fiction writing in the Creative Writing Program and is the former Director of the Honors Program. He is the author of two novels and six other books. He has taught eight study abroad classes in Rome and Berlin. His most recent novel, American Knees, has been made into a movie and will be released in 2010.

  • Honors 397 A: Community Theatre
    SLN 14166 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Michelle Burce (Honors)
    mcburce@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    5:00-6:20
    MGH 206
    Credits: 3, c/nc
    Limit: 15 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Doing theater in a community setting is not just a lot of fun - it can also change a little piece of the world. This course explores the various methods of engaging with a community, addressing a social issue or idea that is important to those people, and putting it on its feet into a performance.

    LEARNING GOALS:
    - Gain familiarity with the field of community-based arts in the US
    - Practice methods of engaging community
    - Learn theatrical methods, games, and techniques
    - Explore ideas of community representation around issues of social change

    COURSE ASSIGNMENTS & EXPECTATIONS:
    The major component of this course is a group project around getting to know a community and creating a short performance about that community. Weekly "process reports" will be required to keep groups on track. There will be ample support for first-time artists in the form of in-class workshops, videos, and guests, in addition to office hours with me upon request. Readings will be assigned weekly to inform in-class discussions, and you will need to meet with your group and community members outside of class time to work on your final composition. One 2-5 page reflection paper will be due at the end of the quarter.

    Most importantly, you will be expected to contribute your voice, your ideas, and your focus for three hours a week during class time. This class will be fast-paced and a lot of fun; you will rarely spend an entire class period sitting in one place. Attendance and participation will be extremely important for this course.

    All levels of drama and community-building experience are welcome.

  • Honors 397 D: Cultivating Creativity
    SLN 14168 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Iain Robertson (Landscape Architecture)
    Office: 348F Gould Hall, Box 355734
    Phone: 543-9246
    iainmr@u.washington.edu
    M
    W
    9:30-11:20
    10:30-11:20
    MGH 206
    MGH 206
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 15 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Creativity is neither a body of knowledge nor a specific technique or skill set; rather, it is an attitude of mind. Its 'cultivation' necessarily differs from educational methods used to acquire disciplinary knowledge and skills. Its 'methods' are best described as 'explorations' followed by 'reflection'. The exploration stage of the seminar consists of individual and collective 'exercises' that range from short in-class work to longer individual 'projects'. Exercises explore, and 'cultivate', participants' creativity. Their content is varied and, I trust, engaging, thought-and creativity-provoking, and, possibly, surprising. Reflections, a crucial act of assimilation, that higher education seems unwilling to accommodate in our "busy lives", will be encouraged!
    Seminar participants will be expected to suspend judgment and take risks wholeheartedly as they engage in activities, discussions and reflections. Without realizing it, we shall work hard and think intensively. The seminar's curriculum, it is hoped, will be 'a mind-altering device' that encourages creative thinking in the sense that Elliot Eisner uses that term in his book The Arts & the Creation of Mind:

    "The point here is that the kind of deliberately designed tasks students are offered in school help define the kind of thinking they will learn to do. The kind of thinking students learn to do will influence what they come to know and the kind of cognitive skills they acquire . . . the curriculum is a mind-altering device . . . Each of the fields or disciplines that students encounter provides a framework, that is, a structure, schema, and theory, through which the worlds is experienced, organized, and understood."
    Through individual and group 'exercises', ranging from short in-class work to longer individual projects, the seminar will explore and 'cultivate' participants' creativity. Students enrolling in the seminar will be expected to suspend judgment and take risks wholeheartedly as they engage in activities, discussions and readings. Without realizing it, we shall work hard and think intensively. The seminar's curriculum, I hope, will be 'a mind-altering device' in Eisner's sense of that term:

    "[T]he kind of deliberately designed tasks students are offered in school help define the kind of thinking they will learn to do. The kind of thinking students learn to do will influence what they come to know and the kind of cognitive skills they acquire. . . the curriculum is a mind-altering device. . . Each of the fields or disciplines that students encounter provides a framework, that is, a structure, schema, and theory, through which the worlds is experienced, organized, and understood." Elliot Eisner, The Arts & the Creation of Mind

    The seminar's goal is to encourage each participant to develop his or her own 'framework', 'structure' or 'schema' for approaching the world with a more creative attitude of mind.

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