Course Archives

  • ARCH 352 C: History of Modern Architecture
    SLN 10323 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Ken Oshima (Architecture)
    Office: 208 Gould, Box 355720
    Phone: 206 221-5681
    koshima@u.washington.edu
    MWF
    F
    10:30-11:20
    11:30-12:20
    KNE 110
    ARC 110
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 20 students

    Registration priority to students enrolled in Honors ARCH 351 Winter 2010.

    Architecture 352 presents a survey of architecture from 1750 to the present (primarily, but not exclusively, in Europe and North America). Emphasis is placed on the development of the architecture of this period including significant buildings and projects, important theories and critical writings.

    Architecture 352 is the third course in the architecture 350-351-352 series. Knowledge of material covered in Architecture 350 and Architecture 351 is expected of those enrolled in Architecture 352. Like other courses in the 350 series, Arch 352 is offered as a series of lectures illustrated with slides. The Honors Section will also include a weekly discussion session focused on additional readings (including primary texts and articles of scholarly research) that address relevant events, practitioners, movements, influences, or broad cultural factors that influenced modern architecture from 1750 to the present. The principal objective in the Honors Section is to serve as an enrichment for the course lectures, exploring (in greater depth) issues that have been raised during the lecture sessions. The readings and assignments are designed to facilitate discussion and an indepth, critical inquiry of architecture, history and theory from 1750 to 2000. Architecture is seen not only as built form but also as consisting of the social practices and cultural discourse that it embodies. The aim of the Honors Section is to develop a deeper understanding of the past by incorporating a diversity of viewpoints.

    Resources for the course include two texts that are available at the University Bookstore: Trachtenberg and Hyman, Architecture from Prehistory to Post-Modernism/The Western Tradition (New York, 2002); and William J.R. Curtis, Modern Architecture Since 1900 3rd Edition (New York and London, 1996).
    A complete course guide (slide list) for all lectures may be purchased in a single bound booklet at the University Bookstore (available by the first day of class). A web site will also be accessible to those enrolled in the course.

    The Honors Section will have a selection of focused readings that will enhance the content of the lectures, but address topics in greater depth. These readings will be available on e-reserves.

    Course requirements for students in the Honors Section will include an in-class midterm,a final exam, and regular written assignments based on the additional readings.

  • ART 140 B: Honors Basic Photography
    SLN 10411 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Zack Bent (Art)
    MW
    11:30-2:20
    ART 116
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 20 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    An introduction to the theories, issues, techniques, and processes of still photography. Projects are assigned that stress the visual and creative potential of the medium. Regular group reviews of your photographic assignments are a valuable and essential component of this class. Additional course content may be delivered through slide lectures, demonstrations, field trips, workshops, discussion, and consultations. Lab work will be largely comprised of digital image processing and basic on-line presentation. Students must provide a cameral with lens, shutter, and aperture controls.

    Evaluation will be based upon the conceptual development / adventurousness of your ideas and technical progress.

  • Honors 253 A: Modern Japan through its Cinema
    SLN 13997 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Ted Mack (Asian Languages and Literature)
    tmack@u.washington.edu
    MW
    2-3:50
    MGH 238
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    This course will be an introduction to modern Japan through its cinema, in which we will use a wide variety of twentieth-century films to discuss a wide variety of topics. Not only will be viewing films in a variety of genres -- documentary, drama, comedy, science fiction, historical, supernatural, avant-garde, and animation -- we will also be discussing topics ranging from the nature of art to the moral questions of nuclear modernity. Although our discussions will be sensitive to the specific nature of film as an expressive medium, we will consider the topics of art, history, society, war, propaganda, tradition, and morality.

    PARTICIPATION: Participation in classroom discussions is central to successful performance in the class. Students must have seen the relevant film before class meetings, read the recommended secondary material, and have written a brief (250-word) reaction paper. Secondary materials are provided to present a variety of responses (primarily academic) to the films. Papers will be submitted at the end of class. Students will be advised during the first meeting concerning how to write appropriate responses.

    GRADING: Grades will be determined through a combination of the student's preparation for and participation in discussions (50%), response papers (30%), and a final examination (20%).

    For more information, see the course website: http://faculty.washington.edu/tmack/0910/as253a.html

  • Honors 253 B: Helen of Troy: from Ancient Epic to the Modern Screen
    SLN 13998 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Ruby Blondell (Classics)
    blondell@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    11:30-1:20
    MGH 284
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    In ancient Greek myth, Helen of Troy is the most beautiful woman in the world and as such a source of both fascination and disaster to men. In this course we will study the larger cultural context that produced such a figure, together with various versions of Helen's story in ancient Greek epic, tragedy, oratory and poetry. We shall also look at related mythic figures such as Pandora and Aphrodite (two more embodiments of female beauty), Clytemnestra (Helen's cousin) and Hercules (her half-brother).

    The course will integrate the study of ancient myth with its reception in film and television. We shall study such works as Wise's Helen of Troy (1955), Petersen's Troy (2004), an episode of Xena: Warrior Princess (1995) and the 2003 miniseries Helen of Troy, asking why Helen's story is so prominent in recent popular culture and looking at ways in which it has been reshaped to reflect contemporary concerns, with particular attention to shifting conceptions of female beauty and power.

    Besides the required reading and viewing, there will be several written assignments culminating in a substantial final paper.

  • Honors 253 C: A Natural History of Reading
    SLN 13999 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Leroy Searle (English and Comparative Literature)
    Office: 426B Padelford, Box 354330
    lsearle@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    1:30-3:20
    MGH 228
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    This course will examine the idea and the activity of reading as a central component in education, philosophy, science, literature and the arts. There will be sections on the Bible, Plato, Kepler, painting and photography, architecture, and imaginative literature. The course materials will consist of texts and examples of other works in which the understanding of a reader, viewer, listener, depends fundamentally on working out problems of meaning and implication.

    This course will be integrated into a Spring quarter conference, with invited guests from other universities, to discuss this topic. During Winter quarter, there will be opportunities for anyone interested in the course to work with me on planning the conference. Anyone interested in doing so should contact me directly.

  • Honors 253 D: Internship for "Teaching What You Know"
    SLN 14000 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Frances McCue (Writer in Residence, UW Honors)
    frances@francesmccue.com
    WF
    2:30-4:20
    MGH 206
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    Students in this course MUST take a Pipeline Orientation prior to the start of Spring quarter. Please visit http://www.washington.edu/uwired/pipeline/orientation.html for more information.

    In this course students will be placed in community sites. The entire class will meet for four group reflection sessions during the regular scheduled class time. The rest of the class sessions will take place in community settings. The major products for this course will be: 1) an ongoing reflective journal on the teaching; 2) a final summary paper including all the lesson plans used in the community setting, an evaluation of the teaching in terms of learner outcomes and satisfaction, and a reflection of what modifications would be needed if the project were replicated.

  • Honors 263 A: Popular Culture, Personal Culture: Constructing Transmedia Worlds
    SLN 14001 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Wanda Gregory (Software Systems-Bothell)
    wanda.gregory@gmail.com
    TTh
    10:30-12:20
    MGH 206
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    "We now live in a world where every story, image, sound, idea, brand, and relationship will play itself out across all possible media platforms. " (Henry Jenkins, 2006). Today we have become the producer with media culture becoming more participatory, changing the relationship between media producers and consumers. Where will this path take us? What new forms of creativity and community will arise within this new media environment? We will look at these questions along with how we construct and project ourselves from the elements of popular culture and media (e.g, games, movies, novels, politics, music, sports)? How many elements have we taken from these types of media and culture to construct our social and individual both in the real and virtual space?

    Topics will include: media convergence, transmedia properties, creation of IPs, future of storytelling, participatory culture, user-generated content, social networks, collective intelligence, fan cultures, virtual worlds, and games. This course will explore topics through case studies, blogging, guest lecturers, readings and group/individual
    projects.

  • Honors 263 B: Reading Women's Lives: Gendered Practices and Shadow Hegemonies in Sierra Leone (2010)
    SLN 14002 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Clarke Speed (Anthropology)

    landogo@u.washington.edu
    MW
    11:30-1:20
    MGH 231
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 35 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Priority to students participating in Sierra Leone study abroad, Summer 2010.

    This course looks to the underneath of women's daily and ordinary practices in Sierra Leone. Our aim is to decloak relations of power, hierarchy, ideology and mystification. Reading Women's Lives opens up new domains contrary to current post-gramscian theories of dominant male hegemonies fed by sterile female counter-hegemonies. Simply put such an argument suggests that women's counter-hegemonies, even in resistance, generate implied cultural consent to patriarchal asymmetry. Here we aim to break with these older paradigms to actually read, see, and know women's knowledge, power, medicine, and secrecy as a kind of sustainable, transformative, shadow hegemony. The instructor makes no claims to being on this gendered inside - we are all outside, looking in at a powerful gendered alterity of women's practices that can only be conceptualized outside of Western models and methods. So, while we seek women-centric practices, we make no claim to Feminist Theory. It is not possible. The course is student generated and Socratic. There are no right answers, only detailed explanations.

    Evaluation includes three concept papers and student presentations.

    Texts include: Aminata Forna, The Devil That Danced on the Waters (2003), Chris Coulter, Bush Wives and Girl Soldiers: Women's Lives in War and Peace in Sierra Leone (2009), and Mariane Ferme, The Underneath of Things (2001).

  • Honors 263 C: Perennial Issues of Education and Schooling
    SLN 14003 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Roger Soder (Education)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 353600
    rsoder@u.washington.edu
    MW
    9:00-11:20
    MGH 206
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    Schooling is a major enculturating function of every society. It is a deeply embedded function in a society, so deeply embedded that it is often difficult to see how schooling works, and it is difficult to raise critical questions about its purpose, design, and functions. As the anthropologist Bronislaw Malinowski said, nothing is as difficult to see as the obvious.

    This difficulty is experienced by many undergraduate students. Undergraduate students have spent more time in formal schooling agencies than in any other agency in society (other than the family). Their very familiarity with schooling is often an obstacle. Honors students in particular most likely have done very well in school: they know how to do school, as it were. But to do well in school is not the same as understanding the social, economic, and political functions of schooling.

    The purpose of this course, then, is to deepen our fundamental understanding of the schooling function in American society. We will identify and address some of the major perennial and critical questions of the schooling through reading and discussion of classic and current texts. Those questions will include:

    - How do we make useful distinctions between "education" and "schooling" and why are these distinctions important?
    - What is the rule of public schools in helping to create and sustain conditions for an authentic and healthy democratic regime? And, moreover, what does "public" mean here?
    - Should schools reflect our society as it is in terms of socioeconomic order and distribution of wealth, or should schools-in the words of sociologist George Counts-"help build a new social order?"
    -Why do some people to better than others in school? What are some of the critical variables?
    -How should schools deal with the tension between liberty and order in a democratic regime? And how should schools deal with the tension between liberty and equality?
    -What is the historical context of the schooling function in the U.S.?
    -How might we usefully frame discussions of democracy, equality, and access to schooling?
    - What are the socio-economic and political relationships between K-12 schooling and higher education?

    Readings will include selections from Aristotle, Quintilian, Montaigne, Whitehead, Richard Hofstadter, and George Counts, as well as contemporary authors on the politics of schooling in terms of race, gender, and social class. We also have three guest speakers.

    Requirements: Short (1-2 page) papers will be prepared for most of the readings; one longer (8-9 page) final paper summarizing and discussion the whole. No formal final exam. Numerical grading on a 4.0 scale. Given that class discussion is very important, attendance is critical.

    Pedagogy: close reading of texts; small and large group discussion; some presentations by the instructor; guest speakers.

  • Honors 263 D: A Brave New World: The Scientific, Economic and Social Impact of Computer Science
    SLN 14004 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Anna Karlin (Computer Science and Engineering)
    karlin@cs.washington.edu
    MF
    1:30-3:20
    CSE 203
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 11 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    This course can also be taken as Honors 222 D for Natural Science credit.
    Priority enrollment to Freshmen; sophomores allowed after March 1 on space-available basis. No upperclassmen.

    Computer science and computing are transforming all aspects of science, engineering and society. In this course, we will explore the intellectual underpinnings, societal implications, and grand challenges in computer science and, via computational thinking, in other fields.

    Topics will include:
    - The mathematical foundation of computation;
    - Logic from Greeks to philosophers to circuits;
    - The World Wide Web and its economic and social ramifications (e.g., Google, Facebook, eBay, Wikipedia, online dating, electronic commerce, etc.)
    - How computers are impacting the arts (music, animation, movies, fine arts);
    - How computers and computational thinking can help cure cancer (computational biology and bioinformatics)
    - Secrets and lies, knowledge and trust (modern cryptography and the erosion of privacy)
    - The mystery of intelligence: What is knowledge? Can computers think? Will computers ever be considered conscious? Where will all this take us?

    Coursework and grading will based on reading, writing (contributing to a "blog"), short problem sets, class participation and laboratory experiments (simple programming) with robots.

    Expected background: NO background in programming is expected. In fact, I would like to strongly encourage students without any programming experience (but with a lot of curiosity and enthusiasm to find out more about this amazing field) to sign up. I am also hoping for students with that ever-elusive "mathematical maturity". If you have any questions about any of this, please contact the instructor (karlin@cs.washington.edu)

  • Honors 263 E: HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa
    SLN 14005 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Danuta Kasprzyk (Senior Research Scientist)
    kasprzyk@battelle.org
    Dan Montano (SPHCM Global Health)
    montano@battelle.org
    TTh
    2:30-4:20
    ART 317
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 10 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    This course can also be taken as Honors 222 C for science credit. Cross-listed with GH 490 B.

    This course will provide an overview of virological, epidemiological, medical/clinical, behavioral, prevention (including medical/clinical, vaccine, behavioral), and psycho-social issues in regards to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Both national (US) and international perspectives will be presented.

    As part of course requirements, students will create a glossary of five terms taken from readings or lectures, to be turned in twice weekly by midnight the day before each class period. In addition, students will be required to write a 15 page research paper whose goal is to contrast the AIDS epidemic with a current or historic disease epidemic. The paper will contrast the AIDS epidemic and disease epidemic chosen by the student in terms of epidemiology (disease transmission and spread), prevention (medical/clinical and/or behavioral), and impact (individual, family, community or global). Choice of contrasting/comparison epidemic must be approved by course instructors. Approval of comparison disease epidemic must occur by mid-quarter (April 30). Papers will be due last week of class (June 4).

    An optional discussion group to discuss issues in more depth will be held after class on Thursdays.

    The course grade is based on the weighting of the paper at 95%, 5% for glossary terms.

  • SIS 202 AI: Cultural Interactions
    SLN 17564 (View Time Schedule info »)

    James Wellman (International Studies)
    Office: 420 Thomson, Box 353650
    Phone: 543-0339
    jwellman@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    8:30-9:20
    SWS 230
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 24 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Must be concurrently enrolled in SIS 202 A (SLN 17555)

    Cultural interaction among societies and civilizations, particularly Western and non-Western. Intellectual, cultural, social, and artistic aspects; historical factors.

  • SIS 202 AJ: Cultural Interactions
    SLN 17565 (View Time Schedule info »)

    James Wellman (International Studies)
    Office: 420 Thomson, Box 353650
    Phone: 543-0339
    jwellman@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    11:30-12:20
    SMI 404
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 24 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Must be concurrently enrolled in SIS 202 A (SLN 17555)

    Cultural interaction among societies and civilizations, particularly Western and non-Western. Intellectual, cultural, social, and artistic aspects; historical factors.

  • BIOC 442 AC: Honors Biochemistry
    SLN 11014 (View Time Schedule info »)

    David Kimelman (Biochemistry, Biology)
    Office: J-533 Health Sciences, Box 357350
    Phone: 206 543-5730
    kimelman@u.washington.edu
    M
    2:30-3:20
    HST T 663
    Credits: 4
    Limit: 30 students

    Contact Lani Stone (stone@chem.washington.edu, 206.543.9343) for add codes.
    BIOC 442 Honors section. Students must also register for Bioc 442 A lecture (SLN 11011). See Time Schedule for course information.

    Biochemistry and molecular biology (with quiz sections) for undergraduate students in molecular and cellular biology, for biochemistry majors, and graduate students in other science departments. Prerequisite: either 2.2 in BIOC 406 or 2.2 in BIOC 441.

  • CHEM 165 A: Honors General Chemistry
    SLN 11689 (View Time Schedule info »)

    MWF
    2:30-3:20
    BAG 260
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 72 students

    Add codes available through Chemistry dept, BAG 303.
    Prerequisite: 2.2 in Honors CHEM 155.
    Students must also sign up for Section AA, AB, or AC. See time schedule for course information.

    Introduction to systematic inorganic chemistry: representative elements, metals, and nonmetals. Includes coordination complexes, geochemistry, and metallurgy. Additional material on environmental applications of basic chemistry presented. Includes laboratory. No more than the number of credits indicated can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: 162, 165 (5 credits); 165, 312 (5 credits).

  • CHEM 337 A: Honors Organic Chemistry
    SLN 11760 (View Time Schedule info »)

    MWThF
    10:30-11:20
    BAG 261
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 40 students

    Add codes available through Chemistry dept.
    Prerequisite: 2.2 in Honors CHEM 336.

    For chemistry majors and otherwise qualified students planning three or more quarters of organic chemistry. Structure, nomenclature, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Theory and mechanism of organic reactions. Studies of biomolecules. Includes introduction to membranes, enzyme mechanisms, prosthetic groups, macromolecular conformations, and supramolecular architecture. No more than 4 credits can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: CHEM 239, CHEM 337.

  • Honors 222 A: Food & the Environment
    SLN 13993 (View Time Schedule info »)

    David Battisti (Atmospheric Sciences)
    Office: 718 ATG, Box 351640
    Phone: (206) 543-2019
    david@atmos.washington.edu
    TTh
    9:30-11:20
    MGH 228
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    The production of food to supply the human population has a large impact on the environment, and this impact is on a global scale. In this course, we will examine the impact of global agriculture today on the physical environment (e.g., on the water cycle, the groundwater, the climate, the soil) and on the global ecosystems (e.g., dead zones, decreased biodiversity). We will also examine the resources that are required to feed humans in the 21st Century (projected to increase 50% by 2050) -- who will likely demand a high protein diet similar to that enjoyed in the US today -- and the impact this enterprise may have on the biosphere.

    A big focus of the course will be an examination of the effect of subsistence farming and industrial on the global biodiversity and on the important global-scale biogeochemical cycles. To illuminate key issues, we will look at some case studies including: subsistence farming of rice in Indonesia; industrial wheat and livestock production in NW Mexico (places I am have worked); and industrial agriculture in the US (to illustrate the impact of subsidies) and Africa (to illustrate the impact of infrastructure deficiencies and climate on agriculture and food security). We will also examine the link between protein production in China and the deforestation of the Amazon to illustrate the profound impact of globalization and industrial agriculture on the environment.

    We will then examine the demands for food production for the next 50-100 years and the resources required and available to produce it: how many people will need to be fed, and how much land, water, nutrients, etc is available to feed these people -- assuming various types of diets? We will examine how global food production is being affected by the rush to produce biofuels and how it will be affected by Global Warming. One of the goals of the course is to envision scenarios for global agriculture that can sustain the projected human population over the 21st Century, and to assess the impact of each scenario on the environment.

    EVALUATION:
    The course format will be as follows. I will present lectures to introduce and discuss important new material and introduce important tools; discussions and questions are encouraged during these lectures. Some of the lecture time will be devoted to discussion of readings that have been assigned.

    Throughout the course we will be reading and discussing articles from general science journals (e.g., Science and Nature). To facilitate our discussion of these papers, you will provide in advanced of the discussions a brief (1-3 page) critique of each paper. The critique should include a brief statement of the salient results, a discussion of potential problems/uncertainties with the results, and issues that remain confusing to you.

    In addition to these critiques, there will be one significant research paper. There may also be some homework assignments and a group project.

    There are no exams in this course.

  • Honors 222 C: HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa
    SLN 13995 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Dan Montano (SPHCM Global Health)
    montano@battelle.org
    Danuta Kasprzyk (Senior Research Scientist)
    kasprzyk@battelle.org
    TTh
    2:30-4:20
    ART 317
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 5 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    This course can also be taken as Honors 263 E for Civilization credit. Cross-listed with GH 490 B.

    This course will provide an overview of virological, epidemiological, medical/clinical, behavioral, prevention (including medical/clinical, vaccine, behavioral), and psycho-social issues in regards to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Both national (US) and international perspectives will be presented.

    As part of course requirements, students will create a glossary of five terms taken from readings or lectures, to be turned in twice weekly by midnight the day before each class period. In addition, students will be required to write a 15 page research paper whose goal is to contrast the AIDS epidemic with a current or historic disease epidemic. The paper will contrast the AIDS epidemic and disease epidemic chosen by the student in terms of epidemiology (disease transmission and spread), prevention (medical/clinical and/or behavioral), and impact (individual, family, community or global). Choice of contrasting/comparison epidemic must be approved by course instructors. Approval of comparison disease epidemic must occur by mid-quarter (April 30). Papers will be due last week of class (June 4).

    An optional discussion group to discuss issues in more depth will be held after class on Thursdays.

    The course grade is based on the weighting of the paper at 95%, 5% for glossary terms.

  • Honors 222 D: A Brave New World: The Scientific, Economic and Social Impact of Computer Science
    SLN 13996 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Anna Karlin (Computer Science and Engineering)
    karlin@cs.washington.edu
    MF
    1:30-3:20
    CSE 203
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 12 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    This course can also be taken as Honors 263 D for Civilization credit.
    Priority enrollment to Freshmen; sophomores allowed after March 1 on space-available basis. No upperclassmen.

    Computer science and computing are transforming all aspects of science, engineering, the economy and society. In this course, we will explore the intellectual underpinnings, societal implications, and grand challenges in computer science and, via computational thinking, in other fields.

    Topics will be drawn from the following (and others):
    - The mathematical foundation of computation;
    - Logic from Greeks to philosophers to circuits;
    - The World Wide Web and its economic and social ramifications (e.g., Google, Facebook, eBay, Wikipedia, online dating, electronic commerce, etc.)
    - How computers are impacting the arts (music, animation, movies, fine arts);
    - How computers and computational thinking can help cure cancer (computational biology and bioinformatics)
    - Secrets and lies, knowledge and trust (modern cryptography and the erosion of privacy)
    - The mystery of intelligence: What is knowledge? Can computers think? Will computers ever be considered conscious? Where will all this take us?

    Coursework and grading will based on reading, writing (contributing to a "blog"), short problem sets, class participation and laboratory experiments (simple programming) with robots.

    Priority enrollment to freshmen.

    Expected background: NO background in programming is expected and although there will be a very small amount of programming, programming is a very minor part of the course. In fact, this course is designed for students without *any* programming experience, but with a lot of curiosity and enthusiasm to find out more about this amazing field. I am also hoping for students with that ever-elusive "mathematical maturity". If you have any questions about any of this (for example if you do have programming experience), please contact me (karlin@cs.washington.edu).

  • Honors 396 A: Discussion Supplement to Biology 220: Thinking like a scientist
    SLN 14010 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Tolga Bilgen (Zoology)
    Office: 430 Hitchcock, Box 355320
    Phone: (206) 616-4029
    tolga@u.washington.edu
    F
    10:30-12:20
    MGH 206
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 30 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Must be concurrently enrolled in BIOL 220.

    This course will focus on discussions of various topics relevant to Biology 220. Readings will include articles from varied sources, including the primary literature. Working in groups, students will complete weekly in-class assignments. Working in pairs, students will also give a short seminar, on a topic of their choice.

  • Honors 396 B: Discussion Supplement to Biology 220: Thinking like a scientist
    SLN 14011 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Tolga Bilgen (Zoology)
    Office: 430 Hitchcock, Box 355320
    Phone: (206) 616-4029
    tolga@u.washington.edu
    F
    12:30-2:20
    MGH 206
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 30 students

    Must be concurrently enrolled in BIOL 220.

    This course will focus on discussions of various topics relevant to Biology 220. Readings will include articles from varied sources, including the primary literature. Working in groups, students will complete weekly in-class assignments. Working in pairs, students will also give a short seminar, on a topic of their choice.

  • MATH 126 C: Honors Calculus with Analytic Geometry III
    SLN 15060 (View Time Schedule info »)

    MWF
    10:30-11:20
    SMI 304
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 80 students

    Add codes are available from Math Department.
    Students must have completed Honors Math 125.
    Students must register for section CA or CB. Check Time Schedule for section information.

    Third quarter in calculus sequence. Introduction to Taylor polynomials and Taylor series, vector geometry in three dimensions,introduction to multivariable differential calculus, double integrals in Cartesian and polar coordinates.

  • MATH 136 A: Accelerated (Honors) Calculus
    SLN 15073 (View Time Schedule info »)

    MTWThF
    10:30-11:20
    HGT DS005
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 40 students

    Add code available from Math Department only.
    Students must have completed Honors MATH 135.

    Covers the material of 124, 125, 126; 307, 308, 318. First year of a two-year accelerated sequence. May not receive credit for both 126 and 136. For students with above average preparation, interest, and ability in mathematics.

  • MATH 336 A: Honors Accelerated Advanced Calculus
    SLN 15103 (View Time Schedule info »)

    MTWThF
    10:30-11:20
    MEB 237
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    Add code available from Math Department only.
    Prerequisite: 2.0 in MATH 335.

    Introduction to proofs and rigor; uniform convergence, Fourier series and partial differential equations, vector calculus, complex variables. Students who complete this sequence are not required to take 309, 324, 326, 327, 328, and 427. Second year of an accelerated two-year sequence; prepares students for senior-level mathematics courses.

  • PHYS 123 B: Waves
    SLN 16874 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Paula Heron (Physics)
    Office: C208B Physics-Astronomy Bldg., Box 351560
    Phone: 206 543-3894
    pheron@phys.washington.edu
    MWF
    9:30-10:20
    PAA A118
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 66 students

    Contact Prof. Heron at pheron@uw.edu for add code.
    Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 123 quiz section and lab required. See time schedule for section & lab info.

    Electromagnetic waves, optics, waves in matter, and experiments in these topics for physical science and engineering majors. Lecture tutorial and lab components must all be taken to receive credit. Credit is not given for both PHYS 116 and PHYS 123. Prerequisite: MATH 126, MATH 129, or MATH 134, any of which may be taken concurrently; PHYS 122.

  • Honors 350 C: Street Newspapers, Homelessness & Poverty
    SLN 14008 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Tim Harris (Real Change)
    rchange@speakeasy.org
    F
    9:30-11:20
    MGH 211 B
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 15 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Street newspapers such as Seattle's Real Change build for a more just society while helping to meet the immediate needs of those most affected by poverty. More than 100 such papers now exist in at least 27 countries, offering opportunity for self-help and political action by homeless people and their allies. This focus group will examine the issues through the lens of the street newspaper movement and provide tools to develop a critical perspective on efforts to "end homelessness." Students will visit the Seattle newspaper, explore local controversies on homelessness in the context of regional and national trends, and engage as activists to become part of the solution. The focus group is led by Timothy Harris, who is the founding Director of Real Change and a leader in the international streetpaper movement.

    Internship opportunities are available with street newspapers, both locally and abroad. Students attending all class sessions and completing the assigned work will receive credit.

  • Honors 396 C: Transformational Technologies for Biology, Medicine, & Health
    SLN 19047 (View Time Schedule info »)

    John Gennari (Medical Education and Biomedical Informatics)

    Phone: 616-6641
    gennari@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    2:30-3:50
    MGH 206
    Credits: 3
    Limit: 15 students

    Cross-listed with MEBI 498 A.

    In this course, you will learn how information technology is transforming the study and practice of biology, medicine, and health care. We introduce the field of biomedical & health informatics through four modules that focus on current technologies in the field: (1) Electronic personal health records, (2) Medical imaging informatics, (3) Bioinformatics and personal genomics, and (4) Public health surveillance systems. The technologies we cover in these modules arose from multi-disciplinary research-some blending of computer science, information science, biology research, and clinical research.

    Each module includes (a) some hands-on experience with a specific software application, (b) discussion of the pragmatic uses and implications of the software, (c) discussion of the theory and concepts underlying that application, and (d) a hands-on assignment where students (or teams of students) must use, modify or adapt the software to a particular setting or purpose. In addition, across the modules, we will learn common themes and open research problems for the field of biomedical informatics.

  • Honors 397 F: Crafting Honors Education: A Working Group
    SLN 18813 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Amanda Hornby (UW Libraries)

    Phone: 206 685-1901
    hornbya@u.washington.edu
    Laura Harrington (Honors)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
    Phone: 205 543-7444
    laurah13@uw.edu
    Amy Piedalue (Geography)

    Phone: 685-1090
    amer@u.washington.edu
    M
    3:30-4:20
    MGH 211 E
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 15 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Honors strives to provide ample opportunities and encouragement for our students to pursue holistic, interdisciplinary undergraduate education, including unique classroom experiences and experiential learning engagements. An important part of this education is taking the time and creating the space for critical reflection. This seminar will involve group and individual reflection and documentation through the creation of electronic Learning Portfolios.

    In this course, students will create Learning Portfolios as integrative tools to examine their undergraduate educational experiences. Using Google applications, students will be asked to creatively reflect on the connections between and across courses and disciplines, as well as how their in-classroom knowledge has (or has not) bridged the gap between academia and real-world experiences. These portfolios may also be used as valuable tools to demonstrate competency and a body of substantial academic and creative work to future employers, higher-learning institutions, faculty mentors, and future selves.

    The portfolios produced in HONORS 397 F will be used as instructive tools for the next generation of Honors students, who will be asked to complete a similar portfolio as part of their Honors requirements in the future. As such, part of students' role in this course will be to reflect on their experience in creating the portfolio, and to provide feedback to contribute to the success of this process in the future.

  • Honors 397 G: The 3 R's: Retaliation, Revenge & Redirected Aggression
    SLN 18815 (View Time Schedule info »)

    David Barash (Psychology)
    Office: 311 Guthrie, Box 351525
    Phone: (206) 543-8784
    dpbarash@u.washington.edu
    Th
    1:30-2:20
    MGH 211 E
    Credits: 1, c/nc
    Limit: 12 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    When people or animals are hurt, they often respond by hurting someone else - if not the initial perpetrator, then another, innocent third party might well be victimized. The resulting cycle of "passing the pain along" helps explain many phenomena, from domestic abuse and road rage to cycles of feuding and revenge, even perhaps certain examples of war as well as concepts of justice and various themes in literature and theology. The course "text" will be a book ms (about 300 pp) written by the instructor, to be published shortly by Oxford University Press. Requirements will be to read the material - which will be distributed via email - and discuss it, suggesting possible changes, areas of incoherence, etc.

  • Honors 397 H: Peer Instructing Seminar
    SLN 19344 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Aley Willis (Honors Program)
    Office: 211 Mary Gates Hall, Box 352800
    Phone: 221-6074
    aleym@u.washington.edu
    Brook Kelly (Honors)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
    Phone: 221.6131
    bbkelly@u.washington.edu
    Laura Harrington (Honors)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
    Phone: 205 543-7444
    laurah13@uw.edu
    W
    3:30-4:20
    MGH 211 B
    Credits: 1, c/nc
    Limit: 10 students

    For Autumn 2010 Peer Instructors Only

  • Honors 398 B: Walking Seminar
    SLN 18814 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Joe Norman (Chemistry)
    Office: 215 Bagley Hall, Box 351700
    Phone: (206) 685-3020
    jgnorman@u.washington.edu
    Amity Ludders (Honors)
    Phone: 970-355-9158
    happywalking@hotmail.com
    Th
    12:30-3:20
    MGH 211 B
    Credits: 3, c/nc
    Limit: 12 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    For the greater part of the human experience on the planet Earth, our legs were our primary mode of transit. In fact, taking a step back, it is very much our upright posture and two straight legs that define us as a species. With the advent of and subsequent adoption of containerized modes of travel (trains, buses, planes, cars) as the dominant means of traversing landscapes in the past two centuries, we have begun to sever our multi-millennial relationship with our legs. In this seminar we will explore not only how walking has influenced myriad facets of our being but also the environmental, economic and health ramifications of turning away from what it is fundamentally to be human.

    Assignments will include:
    - Daily walking journal
    - Read two books from reading list, choose one upon which to provide class with a five minute report
    - Prepare a ten minute class presentation on a suggested topic or professor-approved topic of your choice

  • Honors 397 B: Berlin-Istanbul Seminar (for Summer 2010 study abroad)
    SLN 14012 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Julie Villegas (UW Honors)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
    Phone: 543-7172
    villegas@u.washington.edu
    Shawn Wong (English)
    Office: A503 Padelford Hall, Box 354330
    Phone: (206) 543-6201
    homebase@u.washington.edu
    Credits: 3, c/nc
    Limit: 20 students

    Students must be participating in the Honors study abroad to Berlin & Istanbul, Summer 2010.

    For a description of the Summer program to Berlin-Istanbul, please visit http://depts.washington.edu/uwhonors/international/berlin/.

  • Honors 397 C: Introduction to Alterity Studies in Sierra Leone 2010
    SLN 14013 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Clarke Speed (Anthropology)

    landogo@u.washington.edu
    Brook Kelly (Honors)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
    Phone: 221.6131
    bbkelly@u.washington.edu
    Th
    12:30-2:20
    MGH 206
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 20 students

    Students must be participating in the Honors study abroad to Sierra Leone, Summer 2010.

    This two credit course prepares students for the 2010 Honors/African Studies program to Sierra Leone. In the context of alterity (radical difference) we aim to prepare students for best-cultural practices that maximize their time, value, and experience. The course includes work in the lingua franca Krio, basic words and phrases in Landogo, as well as a primer on daily life, rules, etiquette, and protocol. In this context we will also discuss how ethnography actually works, issues of health, as well as rules and guidelines for food and water. Following our best practices model, we establish absolute responsibility, liability, and consequences for individuals, the UW group, and its relations with the Kagbere community. Texts include: Donald Carter's Under The Tree Called Gbendeh (2005), Emerson, Fretz, and Shaw's Writing Ethnographic Field Notes (1995), and Krio and Landogo language primer by Kelly and Speed (2007). Evaluation is via concept notebooks, library research, and a 5 page research proposal with word work.

  • Honors 397 D: Pre-Trip Seminar in Writing and Sustainability: Ecuador
    SLN 14014 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Chuck Henry (Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, UW Bothell)
    Office: 18115 Campus Way NE; Bothell, WA 98115, Box 358530
    Phone: 425 352-3587
    clh@u.washington.edu
    Elena Olsen (UW Bothell)
    elenao@u.washington.edu
    Th
    6-9pm
    MGH 085
    Credits: 3, c/nc
    Limit: 20 students

    Students must be participating in the Honors study abroad to Ecuador, Summer 2010.

    This class is designed to prepare the student for the upcoming month-long trip to Ecuador. We will:
    - Initiate reading pertinent to the two major classes
    - Write some pre-travel creative nonfiction and analysis
    - Discuss Latin America culture and development
    - Present concepts of sustainability.
    - Prepare students for travel logistics, such as packing lists, tools and materials, health concerns, and conduct.

    Course website: http://faculty.washington.edu/clh/EC2010/

  • Honors 397 E: Amsterdam Seminar (for Summer 2010 study abroad)
    SLN 18812 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Clifford Tatum (Communication, Honors)
    Office: 211 Mary Gates Hall, Box 352800
    clifford@u.washington.edu
    Rob Corser (Architecture)
    Office: 208 Gould, Box 355720
    Phone: 206 685-2992
    Credits: 3, c/nc
    Limit: 20 students

    Students must be participating in the Honors study abroad to Amsterdam, Summer 2010.

    For a description of the Summer program to Amsterdam, please visit http://depts.washington.edu/uwhonors/international/amsterdam/.

A unit within Undergraduate Academic Affairs
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