Course Archives

  • ARCH 350 D: Architecture of the Ancient World (VLPA)
    SLN 10288 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Louisa M. Iarocci (Architecture)

    Phone: 206 221-6046
    liarocci@u.washington.edu
    MWF
    F
    9:30-10:20
    11:30-12:20
    ARC 147
    GLD 440
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 20 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Arts & Humanities

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Architectural history in the Western world from beginnings to AD 550.

  • ART 120 AG: Influences in Contemporary Art (VLPA)
    SLN 10358 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Timea Tihanyi (Art)
    timea@u.washington.edu
    F
    12:30-1:20
    ART 327
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Arts & Humanities

    Students must also register for ART 120 A, SLN 10351. Check time schedule for more information.

    During lectures and hands-on studio sessions we will examine the importance and implications of the visual arts in the larger context of visual culture. We will consider how cultural, social, economical and technological changes have impacted the field of contemporary arts and how artists have responded to these changes. The emphasis of the course is on providing students with tools to engage contemporary art on discursive, critical and intellectual levels.

  • ART 140 F: Honors Photography (VLPA)
    SLN 10366 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Erin Burns (Art)

    hello@erinelyse.com
    MW
    2:30-5:20
    ART 116
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 20 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Arts & Humanities

    ***COURSE FULL FOR ALL STUDENTS***

    Digital camera with a minimum 3 Megapixel capacity and 512 MB memory card is required.

    Please note: a digital camera with a minimum 3 Megapixel capacity and 512 MB memory card is required. Digital cameras are also available for check-out from CSC in Kane Hall. You will spend approximately $50 on printing your images; commercial printing facilities will be utilized.

    CLASS ASSIGNMENTS & GRADING
    Each student will complete photographic projects (both on-line and in print form), submit a written review and participate in group reviews. Each assignment is designed to stimulate consideration of a specific conceptual approach but may be realized with a range of creative solutions.

    Assessment is ongoing throughout the quarter. Regular group reviews of your photographic assignments are a valuable and essential component of this class. Evaluation will be based upon the conceptual development / adventurousness of your ideas and technical progress.

    In addition to the merit of your photographic work, assessment will also be based upon your level of contribution to discussion, your written review and your on-line contributions as reflections of engagement and critical thinking.

    Also, refer to the School of Art guidelines for assessment criteria, which will be handed out in class.

  • COM 407 A: Communication Technology and Politics (I&S)
    SLN 12105 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Kirsten Foot (Communications)
    Office: 102 Communications Bldg, Box 353740
    Phone: 543-4837
    kfoot@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    11:30-1:20
    CMU 104
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 15 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Social Science

    Cross-listed with POL S 451 A, SLN 18002.

    Employs some core concepts of political communication and theories of democracy to examine the emerging role of information and communication technologies in candidate and issue campaigning; online voting; protest and advocacy movements; law-making and electronic governance in the United States and internationally.

  • Honors 205 A: What We Know & How We Know It (VLPA / I&S)
    SLN 20354 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Frances McCue (Writer in Residence, UW Honors)
    frances@francesmccue.com
    MW
    10:30-12:20
    MGH 206
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Interdisciplinary

    *** COURSE FULL TO ALL STUDENTS***
    This course will fulfill your English Composition requirement and your Honors Interdisciplinary requirement. Check with an adviser for more information.

    For freshmen only, this course is an introduction to college-level methods of inquiry. Throughout your academic life at the university, you will be called upon to write, read and converse in order to absorb knowledge and test out ideas. Since academic disciplines are bound by their respective ways of knowing, and because other ways of knowing are empirical and creative, this course will present different ways of coming to knowledge. We'll engage in reading, lectures, dialogue, persuasive writing, journalistic writing, writing for academic papers as well as in creative writing-poems, short stories and vignettes. Expect a lively forum for testing out ideas and a venue to enhance your writing repertoire.

    Expectations for students include: attending all classes with the (substantial) assigned readings completed; contributing to small group presentations; considering one's own belief systems and the belief systems in a respectful and curious manner; being willing to experiment in writing styles and genres. In the end, students should be active questioning learners and show evidence of this engagement.

    Goals for the course include: learning how to negotiate and navigate with different ways of knowing; developing empathic and creative imagination; enhancing student writing; creating models for civic dialogue; and articulating individual learning.

    The course will connect often-separated worlds of research and practice, university and "real world" expertise, and writing and dialogic education.

    This course is the introduction to a year-long sequence-in the winter quarter, the course topic will be "Teaching What We Know" and in the spring, the class will culminate in internships throughout the area. Enrollment in all three terms is not required.

  • Honors 210 B: Celluloid Myth: Puttin' on the Rex (VLPA)
    SLN 14591 (View Time Schedule info »)

    James Clauss (UW Honors, Classics)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
    Phone: 221-6075
    jjc@u.washington.edu
    MW
    2:30-4:50
    MGH 251
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 35 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Arts & Humanities

    ***COURSE FULL FOR ALL STUDENTS***

    While to date at least the sands of Egypt have not yielded up any films from the ancient world, mythology has been a subject of modern cinema from its beginnings in the late 1800s, including various versions of Sophocles' immortal Oedipus Rex. Screen writers and directors have largely assumed the role of story telling and, as story tellers, they return again and again to the ancient Greek and Roman myths, as the recent release of _Clash of the Titans_ can attest. In this course, we will look at films that take up mythological subjects and either represent them in a reimagined and reconstructed antiquity or set them in post-classical times. In one case, a classic Western--and the model for a number of more recent films, including the Star Wars trilogies--though based on a twentieth century novel, nonetheless instantiates the fundamental characteristics of a myth. This movie will become the jump off point for seeing film as encompassing mythic narrative structures in general.

    Students will be asked to read ancient versions of myths and watch modern cinematic versions, comparing and contrasting to uncover what the ancient authors were looking for and how their literary descendants rearticulated their stories. There will be two exams: midterm and final. And the final projects? (1) Identifying, viewing, and describing how a film on a non-mythic topic possesses an underlying mythological narrative structure. (2) The scripting or filming of an ancient myth. That is, students will either describe in a 10-15 page paper the movie they would make, inspired by the films seen in class, or create their own film. Warning: students who have taken the non-Honors version of this course in the past have reported that their friends and family refuse to watch movies with them.

  • Honors 210 C: Berlin & Beyond: Contemporary German Literature (I&S)
    SLN 20890 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Brigitte Prutti (Germanics)
    Office: 345 Denny Hall, Box 353130
    Phone: 206 543-6025
    triest@u.washington.edu
    MW
    1:30-3:20
    DEN 209
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Arts & Humanities

    Cross-listed with German 390 B, SLN 14434.

    Twenty years after the fall of the Berlin wall German literature is strikingly diverse and readable. Young writers in their twenties and thirties produce bestselling stories and novels and they garner major literary prizes. They are quickly translated and reviewed both in Germany and abroad. Daniel Kehlmann's historical novel The Measurement of the World (2005) about two famous 19th century German scientists was on several bestseller lists and has been translated into more than 40 languages. Both migrant and women writers have been powerful voices in shaping the current literary scene. Three German-speaking writers have been awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature since 1999, two of them women, namely the Austrian novelist and playwright Elfriede Jelinek (2004), and the Romanian-born immigrant writer Herta Muller (2009). How did this come about? What are the major trends in contemporary German literature? Who are its most visible proponents? Why the international appeal? In which respects can we speak of a post- or transnational literature here? This course provides some answers. It introduces students to contemporary German literature since the mid-1980s, focusing on prose fiction by a diverse group of well-known younger writers who started their literary careers after the fall of the wall: Daniel Kehlmann, Judith Hermann, Yoko Tawada, Sasa Stanisic, Marcel Beyer, and Jenny Erpenbeck, among others. Texts on the reading list range from playful historical adventure novels to postmodern travel narratives; from fictional portraits of youthful melancholia in the Berlin Republic to narratives of displacement in different parts of the world; from multi-generational family novels to various kinds of border crossings. We will draw on pertinent critical concepts (e.g. Ha Jin's notion of "the writer as migrant") to help us link our close readings of these texts in interesting and productive ways. The course has three overall goals: to foster students' interest in literature in translation; to broaden students' literary and cultural horizons; and to sharpen their analytical skills with regard to modern prose fiction. Course requirements include two take-home essay assignments, three short-answer quizzes, and one take-home essay final. Readings and lectures in English.

  • Honors 230 A: Race & Advertising in Americana (I&S)
    SLN 14596 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Clarke Speed (Anthropology)

    landogo@u.washington.edu
    MW
    11:30-1:20
    MGH 231
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 35 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Social Science

    No Incoming Freshmen.

    This Honors course seeks visual literacy in the world of Americana, especially in terms of a racialized logic found cloaked in advertizing and print media. We explore how biology, phenotype, history, and class become culturally embellished with moral value. While totally arbitrary in its origins, race matters in Americana. Race-as-class is at the core of all that we believe. As a Social Darwinian form of 'faith,' race-as-class is our basic form of social (taxonomic) difference. As a form of cultural production, race-as-class is forever differentiated even as it is represented as de-differentiated. Put simply, racial images in Americana, rather than reconciling our racial past, extend its hegemony via layer upon layer of unresolved contradiction. The formula of not-same as never-equal generates differal and detour of political equity. As a Socratic dialogue, both the course and preceptor assume no right answer. Following the Honors ethos of critical interrogation, advocacy, and activism, we seek application in the grit of ordinary life primarily outside, but by implication, inside the academy. The course is student focused and generated via student precis, presentations, and three short analytical concept papers.

  • Honors 230 B: Leadership, Democracy & a More Thoughtful Public (I&S)
    SLN 14597 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Roger Soder (Education)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 353600
    rsoder@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    9:30-11:20
    MGH 206
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Social Science

    FRESHMEN ONLY - FIG COURSE

    Register for the Honors FIG using SLN 14152.

    We will consider the following five propositions:

    1. Leadership always has a political context; leadership in a democracy is necessarily different than leadership in other political regimes.

    2. Leadership involves at its base the creation of a persuaded audience, but, more than persuasion, involves creating and sustaining a more thoughtful public, a public capable of rising above itself.

    3. A more thoughtful public must not only be created and sustained, but, given that things inevitably fall apart, must be recovered and reconstituted.

    4. Distinctions must be made in the leadership functions of (a) initiating, (b) sustaining, and c) recovering and reconstituting. What it takes for leader to sustain isn't quite the same as what it takes to initiate, and neither of these approach what it takes to recover and reconstitute when the organization or regime falls apart.

    5. Good leadership involves ethical and effective information seeking. A leader must have knowledge of what must be done, knowledge of what it takes to persuade others of what must be done (and, in persuading, creating a more thoughtful public), and knowledge of how an audience/public will respond. Only with a thorough understanding of the principles, strategies, and costs of information seeking will one be able to engage in ethical and effective leadership.

    Sources of texts will include, but not be limited to: Tocqueville, Sophocles, Machiavelli, Lincoln, Kautilya, Dostoevsky, the Tao-Te-Ching, the Huainanzi, as well as contemporary authors.

    Method of instruction: close reading of texts, coupled with short papers on texts, plus a longer (5-8 page) synthesis paper; small and large group discussions with each other and visiting scholars/practitioners.

  • Honors 230 D: From Socrates to Rosa Parks: Historical & Moral Development of Dissent (I&S)
    SLN 14599 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Taso Lagos (International Studies)
    Office: 400 Thomson Hall, Box 353650
    Phone: (206) 543-4370
    taso@u.washington.edu
    MTWTh
    10:30-11:20
    MGH 228
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 35 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Social Science

    Why do some individuals take it upon themselves to stand up against society, in the process being ostracized, losing jobs, being jailed, or, worse, dying? What is it about western society that makes dissent possible and even perhaps necessary? This survey class looks at the issue of dissent through the eyes of selected individuals (Socrates, Machiavelli, Martin Luther, Jonathan Swift, and Rosa Parks) to determine what elemental force dissent plays on the development of democracy and human morality. This class will involve extensive reading, class discussion, mock trials, a research paper involving the "New York Times" and regular "thought papers." Challenging but rewarding. We close the class with a special "dissent reading" in Red Square.

  • Honors 391 A: The Sociological and Social-Psychological Significance of Racial Discrimination from Slavery to the Twenty-First Century: Exploring the Present via an Examination of the Socio-Historical Processes of the Past (VLPA / I&S)
    SLN 14606 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Al Black (Sociology)
    Office: 117 C Savery, Box 353340
    Phone: (206) 685-7284
    TTh
    10:30-12:20
    SAV 168
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Interdisciplinary

    The primary focus of the course is to develop a theoretical explanation of the present through an investigation of the past and the present. My specialty as a professor here at the UW for the past thirty-four years (and then some) has been the study of inequality in its various and sometimes crosscutting forms, racial, gender and class. This particular course focuses on African Americans and involves all three types of inequality. The course is insightful, and timely given the more recent debates and/or the litigation surrounding affirmative action, reparations, and post-racialism. In terms of history, it focuses on the following issues:
    - Slavery, agricultural and industrial;
    - The effects of the Civil War and its aftermath, the betrayal of the federal government, the violence of southern whites, the use of black codes and Jim Crow legislation on key institutional access issues;
    - The historical use of violence as a primary mechanism to establish and maintain racial preference;
    - The history of estate and caste discrimination and its consequences;
    - The denial of equal access to the labor market and its sociological and economic consequences;
    - The theoretical relationship between the past and the present in the racial history of the United States of America
    - Rendering implicit processes and patterns of systematic and institutional discrimination in African American history explicit (rendering the implicit explicit);
    - The destabilization of the African American family and community;
    - Finally, given the interdisciplinary focus of the new Honors curriculum the socio-psychological effects of a lifetime of racial discrimination on its victims.

    EXPECTATIONS & ASSIGNMENTS:
    - Students are expected to use a portfolio format for this course.
    - Each student will also be expected to develop a research project focused on race and TV commercial advertisements.

  • Honors 391 B: Gender Concepts in Western Civilization (VLPA / I&S)
    SLN 14607 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Clare Bright (Gender Studies (GWSS))
    Office: B-110 Padelford, Box 354345
    Phone: (206) 543-6900
    cbright@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    11:30-1:20
    SMI 313
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Interdisciplinary

    An exploration and critique of the dominant themes and paradigms which have shaped Western European thought, with special focus on concepts of "woman" and "man." Theories of knowledge and reality will also be covered. Feminist perspectives will be studied along with more traditional viewpoints.

    COURSE OBJECTIVES
    * To provide an overview of the dominant philosophical paradigms in western thought.
    * To assess such paradigms critically, especially from feminist perspectives To become familiar with the concepts of major thinkers regarding "woman" and "man"
    * To analyze the social and metaphysical contexts for these definitions
    * To develop the student's ability to analyze and formulate theory
    * To facilitate the thoughtful verbal and written expression of knowledge gained this term

    REQUIRED READINGS
    Riane Eisler, The Chalice and the Blade
    Plato, The Republic
    The Bible (A protestant version of your choice)
    Woman in Western Thought (Reading Packet #1)
    Reading Packet #2
    (Both Reading Packets available at Professional Copy, 42nd & the Ave.)

    COURSE REQUIREMENTS
    Class Participation (30%): Students are expected to be at all class sessions and to be prepared for class discussion. This means studying the readings for the unit scheduled and coming to class with ideas to share. Acceptable participation includes both thoughtful comments and active, respectful listening, as well as an appropriate balance between them. One absence is permitted without affecting your participation grade.

    Two Take-home essay assignments (20% each): Dates TBA

    Group Project (15%): Details and guidelines TBA

    Final Exam (15%): An in-class comprehensive exam. No make-ups for final exam.

  • Honors 391 D: "I am Charlotte Simmons": An Interactive Health Seminar Based on the Novel by Tom Wolfe (VLPA / I&S / NW)
    SLN 19972 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Clarence Spigner (Health Services)
    Office: H-692 Health Sciences Building, Box 357660
    Phone: 206 616-2948
    cspigner@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    1:30-3:20
    SAV 155
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Interdisciplinary

    Priority to freshmen. Open to all UW students.
    Students who take this course should be open to discussing controversial issues of college life.

    This seminar will engage in intense discussion about student life and encompass key aspects of health and wellbeing. The framework is the controversial novel, I am Charlotte Simmons, by Tom Wolfe, that chronicles the world view of an 18 year-old undergraduate female, Charlotte Simmons, and her first year at a northeastern college. The highly readable work addresses college campus issues including self esteem, sexual risk-taking, cultures of drinking, date-rape, pathological narcissism, depression, disclosure, student-athletes, elitism, sororicide and fraternities, social support, and family-ties. These social dynamics are reflected in brutal, outrageous and stylistic formats in Charlotte's Alice in Wonderland initiation into year-one of undergraduate life. A chronology of events builds in the 34 chapter novel to inform a deeper understanding of the human condition. In this course/seminar, health education theories serve are frameworks; such as Social Learning or Cognitive Theory, the Theory of Reasoned Action, the Stages of Change or Trans-theoretical Model, and the Health Belief Model.

    The Socratic approach is employed to give students a voice. Students must bring the maturity and intellect to critically examine both the summit and the pitfalls of campus life.

  • Honors 397 B: Ways of Meaning: Universal and Culture Specific Aspects of Language (I&S)
    SLN 20285 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Katarzyna Dziwirek (Slavic Languages and Literatures)
    Office: M260 Smith, Box 353580
    Phone: 543-7691
    dziwirek@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    12:30-2:20
    LOW 115
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 10 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Social Science

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Cross-listed with SLAV 425 A (SLN 18630)

    This course addresses how people talk to each other in different languages, to what extent the language we speak determines who we are, and the relationship between language and thought, culture, & national identity. We will discuss moral concepts, friendship and love, freedom, homeland, politeness and rudeness, and gender.

    Course website: http://faculty.washington.edu/dziwirek/slav425/slav425.shtml

  • SIS 200 AI: States and Capitalism: The Origins of the Modern Global System (I&S)
    SLN 18490 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Resat Kasaba (International Studies)
    Office: 322 Thomson, Box 353650
    Phone: 543-6890
    kasaba@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    12:30-1:20
    TBA
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Social Science

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Students must also register for SIS 200 A lecture, SLN 18481.

    Origins of the modern world system in the sixteenth century and its history until World War I. Interacting forces of politics and economics around the globe, with particular attention to key periods of expansion and crisis.

  • SIS 200 AJ: States and Capitalism: The Origins of the Modern Global System (I&S)
    SLN 18491 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Resat Kasaba (International Studies)
    Office: 322 Thomson, Box 353650
    Phone: 543-6890
    kasaba@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    2:30-3:20
    BAG 106
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Social Science

    ***COURSE FULL TO ALL STUDENTS***

    Students must also register for SIS 200 A lecture, SLN 18481.

    Origins of the modern world system in the sixteenth century and its history until World War I. Interacting forces of politics and economics around the globe, with particular attention to key periods of expansion and crisis.

  • BIOC 440 AA: Honors Biochemistry (NW)
    SLN 11011 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Rachel Klevit (Biochemistry and Biomolecular Structure Center)
    Office: K-466A Health Sciences, Box 357350
    Phone: 206 543-5891
    klevit@u.washington.edu
    Th
    11:30-12:20
    HST T530
    Credits: 4
    Limit: 20 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Contact advisers@chem.washington.edu for add code.
    Students must also register for BIOC 440 A, SLN 11010.

    Biochemistry and molecular biology (with quiz sections) for undergraduate students in molecular and cellular biology, for biochemistry majors, and graduate students in other science departments.

    Prerequisite: 2.5 BIOL 200; 2.5 in either CHEM 224, CHEM 239, or CHEM 337; 2.0 in either MATH 124, MATH 134, or MATH 144

  • BIOL 250 AE: Honors Marine Biology (NW)
    SLN 13865 (View Time Schedule info »)

    F
    1:30-4:20
    FSH 142
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 8 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    FOR ALL QUESTIONS/ADD CODES, PLEASE EMAIL MARBIOL@U.WASHINGTON.EDU.
    Students must also register for BIO 250 A lecture (SLN 11192)

    Lecture-laboratory course in Marine Biology focusing on physical, biological, and social aspects of the marine environment. Topics include oceanography, ecology, physiology, behavior, conservation, fisheries, exploration, and activism. Evening marine biology movies and weekend field trip. Honors section research project. Offered: jointly with FISH/OCEAN 250.

  • CHEM 145 A: Honors General Chemistry (NW)
    SLN 11724 (View Time Schedule info »)

    MWF
    2:30-3:20
    BAG 260
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 72 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Students must see Chem adviser in Bagley 303 for entry code.
    See Time Schedule for information on pre-requisites.

    Honors Chem 145 and 155 cover material in 142, 152, and 162. Includes laboratory. No more than the number of credits indicated can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: 142, 145 (5 credits); 145, 155, 162 (10 credits).

    Students must also register for a quiz section; see Time Schedule for more information.

  • CHEM 335 A: Honors Organic Chemistry (NW)
    SLN 11810 (View Time Schedule info »)

    MTWF
    10:30-11:20
    BAG 261
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 70 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Students must see Chem adviser in Bagley 303 for entry code.
    Prerequisite: either CHEM 155 or CHEM 162.

    For chemistry majors and otherwise qualified students planning three or more quarters of organic chemistry. Structure, nomenclature, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Theory and mechanism of organic reactions. Studies of biomolecules. No organic laboratory accompanies this course. No more than 5 credits can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: 221, 223, 237, 335.

  • Honors 220 A: Astrobiology: The contribution of extraterrestrial materials like meteorites and comets to the origin of life on Earth (NW)
    SLN 14592 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Graciela Matrajt (Astronomy)

    Phone: 206 685-0542
    matrajt@astro.washington.edu
    TTh
    12:30-2:20
    MGH 242
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    ***COURSE FULL for ALL students***

    Priority given to non-science students, and freshmen & sophomores. Upper classmen and students majoring in science, contact Prof. Matrajt for permission.

    How did life arise on Earth? Is there life elsewhere in the Universe? If any, is it possible to find/detect it? The mystery of our origins is a question that has preoccupied humans for millennia. Today, this question remains unanswered, although there are many ideas. In this course we will explore the possible approaches to answer these questions. We will first study the history of the sciences that led to approaching these questions, and the chain of thinking that has guided scientists in the search for the origin of life. This is a new science called Astrobiology and it is based in interdisciplinary studies. We will define life. We will briefly study the life cycle of stars and the formation of the Solar System to understand the physical and chemical constraints to form and maintain an Earth-like planet where life can develop. We will then investigate the delivery of organic materials, in particular those molecules that are currently found in life forms, by meteorites and comets. We will learn about the various types of meteorites and we will even handle some. We will learn about comets and we will even look at some cometary particles with a microscope. We will talk about Stardust, the NASA mission that brought cometary particles back to Earth. We will learn which instruments are best and more useful to look for extraterrestrial life, and we will talk about the controversial Martian meteorite in which some people thought they have found evidence of life.

    COURSE OBJECTIVES:
    This course provides an overview of a new interdisciplinary science, Astrobiology, with emphasis on the delivery of organic molecules by comets and asteroids.

    This course will provide knowledge in chemistry, history of sciences, biochemistry, astronomy, geology, geochemistry and biology. In addition, students will learn about different analytical instruments that scientists use to investigate meteorites, but which can also be used to make research in many other different fields.

    GENERAL METHODS OF INSTRUCTION:
    The class will meet 2 times a week (T,Th) for 2 hours. Each session will be divided in two halves with a short recess. In addition to the lectures, there will be in-class activities:
    a) handle scientific material (rocks, meteorites, observation of diverse samples in optical microscope)
    b) watch educational movies/documentaries related to the topic of that week
    c) visit an on-campus laboratory (including an electron microscope, a clean room where extraterrestrial samples are processed, chemistry laboratory, etc).
    d) Discussion of published scientific articles in small (3-4 students) groups and then expose for 5-10 min the results of the discussion, or prepare a written report with the results of the discussion.

    Guest lecturers may also participate.

    RECOMMENDED PREPARATION:
    This course is aimed for NON-SCIENCE students. Pre-science freshmen and sophomores are OK in this class. There are no science prerequisites for this class. This is an introductory course so no previous knowledge of the subject is assumed. However, students will be reading and discussing many papers so enthusiasm for reading is necessary.

    GRADING POLICY:
    Participation in class 5%
    Quizzes 10 %
    Homework 5%
    Mid-term project 15 %
    Final project 15 %
    Mid-term exam 25 %
    Final exam 25 %

    TEXT
    "Planets and Life" (2007) by W. T. Sullivan and J. A. Baross. Cambridge University Press.

    Additional readings include selections from:
    "An Introduction to Astrobiology" (2003) edited by I. Gilmour and M. A. Sephton Cambridge University Press.
    "Life in the Universe" (2007) by J. Bennett and S. Shostak.
    Plus a number of articles (mostly Scientific American or New Scientist type) that I will send/distribute during the course.

  • Honors 220 B: The Prophets of Sustainability (NW)
    SLN 14593 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Brenda Bourns (Biology)
    bournsb@seattleu.edu
    W
    F
    12:30-1:50
    12:30-4:20
    MGH 228
    MGH 228
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Environmental Sustainability: Has our prophet arrived?
    Environmental Sustainability: Is our country ready?

    Consider the ancient Chinese proverb: "If we don't change our direction, we're likely to end up where we're headed."

    "Sustainability" has become a common catchword in our culture. In this course we will examine the ecological concepts behind the sustainability movement using as a context the environmental "prophets" and examining how media plays a role in shaping our thinking about the topic of sustainability. Further, we will take it beyond the academic, using as a vehicle "experiential learning" and reaching out beyond our classroom experience to involve ourselves more viscerally in some of the issues related to sustainability that affect our actual lives.

    This 5 credit course will meet twice/week. On Wednesdays, we will meet for an hour and a half to lay out the conceptual framework for the course. A longer timeslot (four hours on Friday afternoon) will accommodate the "experiential" side of the course - field trips to locales of interest to the topic of sustainability, opportunities to volunteer on a "service learning" project, and/or guest lectures and tours. Students will also be given the possibility of opting out of the longer class period to spend an equivalent amount of time volunteering at a pre-approved local sustainability focused non-profit or similar experience for the duration of the quarter.

    This course will explore the question: Is the United States ready to seriously examine and change the habits that lead to Global Warming?

    We will begin with reading together the book Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael Pollan as a means to examine the academic ecological concepts upon which "sustainability" is based (biogeochemical cycling, trophic structure, biomagnification, food webs, greenhouse effect). Then groups will be assigned to each of several media pieces - each group will be responsible to read or watch it, prepare a discussion exercise ahead of time, present background using excerpts from the piece, and then lead a discussion on that piece.

    Together, we will explore the following questions, as well as any of your own:

    How do these prophets get their message out? What assets do different forms of media bring to the goal of propagating an idea? Why do we believe these prophets? In the case of sustainability, are their ideas backed up by science and how do we know? How do they gain credibility?

    Grading for the course will be 50% class participation, 20% student-led activity/presentation, 30% final portfolio of reflections.

    Course Objectives: comprehension of ecology concepts relevant to normal living, skill at identifying popular culture use of scientific concepts, deeper appreciation for the "why" of sustainable living, appreciation of the role of media in propagating ideas, practice in lifelong learner skills, practice at being in a leadership role in a learning community, involvement in community through experiences.

  • Honors 220 C: The Digestive Digest (NW)
    SLN 14594 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Tolga Bilgen (Zoology)
    Office: 430 Hitchcock, Box 355320
    Phone: (206) 616-4029
    tolga@u.washington.edu
    MW
    12:30-2:20
    MGH 206
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    **Course Full**

    Starting from basic digestive system physiology, this course will broaden its scope to cover appetite/body weight control, nutrition, and health issues. How do you 'know' when you're hungry? Can dietary choices lead to diabetes, or other disease states? Are you really what you eat?

  • Honors 396 A: Discussion Supplement to BIOL 180: Thinking Like a Scientist (NW)
    SLN 14609 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Diane Genereux (Biology)

    Phone: 206 616-9385
    genereux@u.washington.edu
    Th
    3:30-5:20
    MGH 254
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 25 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Students must be concurrently enrolled in BIOL 180. Check time schedule for more information.

    This course will focus on discussions of various topics relevant to BIOL 180. Readings will include articles from varied sources, including the primary literature. Working in groups, students will complete weekly in-class assignments. Working in pairs, students will also give a short seminar, on a topic of their choice.

  • Honors 396 B: Discussion Supplement to BIOL 200: Thinking Like a Scientist (NW)
    SLN 14610 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Kristy Brady (Biology)
    Office: Development, Outreach, & Communications, Box 351800
    Phone: 685-2185
    kbrady@u.washington.edu
    Th
    3:30-5:20
    MGH 248
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 25 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Students must be concurrently enrolled in BIOL 200. Check time schedule for more information.

    This course will focus on discussions of various topics relevant to BIOL 200. Readings will include articles from varied sources, including the primary literature. Working in groups, students will complete weekly in-class assignments. Working in pairs, students will also give a short seminar, on a topic of their choice.

  • Honors 396 C: Life & Death Computing (NW)
    SLN 19957 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Ira Kalet (Radiation Oncology)
    Office: NN146A UW Medical Center, Box 356043
    Phone: 598-4107
    ikalet@u.washington.edu
    MW
    9:30-11:20
    MGH 248
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Exposure to calculus (e.g. MATH 124, 125) is beneficial, but not required.

    Prior programming experience is not required, but a willingness to learn is essential.

    This course is about the application of computer software and technology to safety critical applications in medicine and health care, as well as in the application of computing to unlock the secrets of life. The use of computers is ubiquitous in medical devices, particularly in medical imaging and cancer treatment, where life saving capabilities are now available. At the same time, failure of these computerized systems has resulted in deaths and serious injuries. As billions of dollars are invested in electronic medical record systems and the widespread use of the Internet in medical practice, the number of data breach incidents has grown, and huge threats to personal privacy loom before us. In this course we will delve into the technical details of some of these matters. Students will explore algorithms and ideas by writing and running small computer programs, as well as applying some elementary ideas from calculus and physics where needed.

  • Honors 396 D: Honors 396 D: Discussion Supplement to BIOL 180: Thinking Like a Scientist (NW)
    SLN 20632 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Diane Genereux (Biology)

    Phone: 206 616-9385
    genereux@u.washington.edu
    F
    11:00-12:50
    MGH 231
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 30 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Students must be concurrently enrolled in BIOL 180. Check time schedule for more information.

    This course will focus on discussions of various topics relevant to BIOL 180. Readings will include articles from varied sources, including the primary literature. Working in groups, students will complete weekly in-class assignments. Working in pairs, students will also give a short seminar, on a topic of their choice.

  • MATH 124 H: Honors Calculus with Analytic Geometry (NW)
    SLN 15776 (View Time Schedule info »)

    MWF
    10:30-11:20
    SIG 225
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 60 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Students must contact Math Department for add code. Students must also register for quiz section HA or HB; see time schedule for more information.

    First quarter in calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes differential calculus. Emphasizes applications and problem solving using the tools of calculus. Prerequisite: 2.5 in MATH 120, score of 68% on MATHPC placement test, score of 75% on MATHEC placement test, or score of 2 on AP test.

  • MATH 134 A: Accelerated Honors Calculus (NW)
    SLN 15850 (View Time Schedule info »)

    MTWThF
    10:30-11:20
    TBA
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 35 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Students must contact Math Department for placement information and add code.

    Covers the material of 124, 125, 126; 307, 308, 318. First year of a two-year accelerated sequence. May receive advanced placement (AP) credit for 124 after taking 134. For students with above average preparation, interest, and ability in mathematics.

  • MATH 334 A: Accelerated Honors Advanced Calculus (NW)
    SLN 15893 (View Time Schedule info »)

    MTWThF
    10:30-11:20
    TBA
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 35 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Students must contact Math Department for add code.
    Prerequisite: either 2.0 in MATH 136, or 2.0 in MATH 126; 2.0 in MATH 307; either 2.0 in MATH 205, 2.0 in MATH 308, or 2.0 in MATH 318.

    Introduction to proofs and rigor; uniform convergence, Fourier series and partial differential equations, vector calculus, complex variables. Students who complete this sequence are not required to take MATH 309, 310, 324, 326, 327, 328, and 427. Second year of an accelerated two-year sequence; prepares students for senior-level mathematics courses.

  • PHYS 121 B: Honors Mechanics (NW)
    SLN 17694 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Paula Heron (Physics)
    Office: C208B Physics-Astronomy Bldg., Box 351560
    Phone: 206 543-3894
    pheron@phys.washington.edu
    MWF
    9:30-10:20
    PAA A118
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 66 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Contact Prof Heron at pheron@phys.washington.edu for add code.
    Prerequisite: MATH 124, MATH 127, MATH 134, or MATH 145, any of which may be taken concurrently; recommended: one year high school physics

    Students need to also sign up for an Honors tutorial section and a lab (times for these sections are listed in the UW Time Schedule).

    Basic principles of mechanics and experiments in mechanics for physical science and engineering majors. Lecture tutorial and lab components must all be taken to receive credit. Credit is not given for both PHYS 114 and PHYS 121.

  • ENVIR 497 A: Dirt & the King of Fish
    SLN 13569 (View Time Schedule info »)

    David Montgomery (Earth and Space Sciences)
    dave@ess.washington.edu
    Th
    3:30-5:20
    MGH 085
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 15 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Seminars
    H-Special Topics

    Honors students wishing Honors seminar credit for this course should confirm credit with an Honors adviser for DARS purposes.

    No add code required to register.

    This course will examine the relationship between science, economics, and natural resource management through the case studies of salmon (King of Fish) and agriculture (Dirt). Interactive discussion format will involve discussions motivated by weekly readings in the two books that together form the course title.

  • Honors 350 A: Philosophy Over Lunch
    SLN 14605 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Ken Clatterbaugh (Philosophy)
    Office: 345B Savery, Box 353350
    Phone: (206) 543-5086
    clatter@u.washington.edu
    W
    11:30-1:20
    MGH 211 B
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 15 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Seminars
    H-Special Topics

    ***COURSE FULL***

    No Incoming Freshmen.

    This seminar is intended as a reasonably sophisticated introduction to philosophy. The major areas of philosophy, such as philosophy of science, philosophy of mind, ethics, political philosophy, will be covered. When possible guest faculty who are expert in theses areas will be invited. The purpose of the course is to give a student a sense of what goes on in these particular areas of philosophy and an opportunity to engage in a philosophical discussion all while having an appropriately nutritious lunch. The only text will be Simon Blackburn's Think.Grades will be based on participation, which means coming to class having read the material, thought about it, and having something to say about it.

  • Honors 350 B: The Art of Listening
    SLN 20249 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Eric Liu (Education)
    epliu@msn.com
    Th
    1:30-3:20
    MGH 211B
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 15 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Seminars
    H-Special Topics

    ***COURSE FULL***

    No incoming freshmen.

    In the worlds of work and citizenship, one of most essential skills for success is listening: with compassion, with discernment, with detachment, with strategy. Yet listening is one skill we aren't generally taught in college or high school civics. Worse, the adversarial and competitive aspects of modern political culture can often push us toward a kind of selective deafness. This seminar will immerse students in applied experiences of deep listening. We will use materials from public debates, everyday conversations, speeches. We will use audio, video, and live exercises. We will be joined by guests from the legal profession and also from the media, theater, politics, medicine, business and social work. The aim of the course is to sharpen each student's ability to listen well -- at work, at school, and in everyday life -- on the notion that mindful and skillful listening makes for great citizens, powerful leaders, and complete human beings.

    About the instructor: Eric Liu is an acclaimed author and educator who served as a speechwriter and deputy domestic policy adviser to President Clinton. A graduate of Harvard Law School and Yale College, he is the author of "Imagination First," a book of practices for cultivating imagination; "Guiding Lights," a book on the art of mentoring that is the Official Book of National Mentoring Month; and "The True Patriot," a bestselling treatise on reframing patriotism in progressive terms. Liu is the founder of the Guiding Lights Network, which produces experiential conferences on the art of mentoring and public leadership and he hosts the local television interview show "Seattle Voices." Liu also teaches the popular Honors course called "How to Read, Write, and Speak."

  • Honors 398 A: Doing Translation: A seminar in practice (first) and theory (afterwards)
    SLN 14612 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Steve Harrell (Anthropology)
    Office: M41 Denny, Box 353010
    Phone: (206) 543-9608
    stevehar@uw.edu
    W
    1:30-4:20
    MGH 211B
    Credits: 3
    Limit: 10 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Seminars
    H-Special Topics

    ***COURSE FULL***
    No Incoming Freshmen.
    Cross-listed with ANTH 525 A, SLN 10257.
    Students must be comfortable in at least one of the following languages: German, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Chinese, or Japanese.

    Translation is hard. It involves much more than just knowing two languages well. Because languages differ from one another in syntax and in the objects of vocabulary, something is always "lost in translation." What to lose, and how to choose, are the topics of this course. If you deal regularly in one or more languages other than English, if you are interested in the process of translation, and if you like doing hard mental exercises and reflecting on them with other intelligent people, this class is for you. Every week we will do a different exercise that exposes us to the joys, frustrations, and intellectual challenges of actually doing translation. I welcome students from any discipline, but you will need to have a good working knowledge of Spanish, German, Portuguese, French, Chinese, or Japanese if you want to take this course. You can find out more from the class website for the last time I taught the course, in 2006, although you can expect some changes for this time. I also welcome inquiries from interested students.

  • ENGL 281 F: Intermediate Expository Writing
    SLN 13310 (View Time Schedule info »)

    MW
    2:30-4:20
    MGH 248
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 23 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Special Topics
    H-Special Topics

    ***COURSE FULL***

    This course satisfies the English Composition requirement, but does not award any Honors Core credit.

    Writing papers communicating information and opinion to develop accurate, competent, and effective expression.

  • GEN ST 199 I2: Honors FIG #82 (I&S)
    SLN 14152 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Elizabeth Hiskey (Honors)

    bhiskey@u.washington.edu
    Credits: 7
    Limit: 25 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Special Topics
    H-Special Topics

    Please note that the Honors FIG only constitutes 7 credits. Students must be registered for at least 12 credits to qualify as a full-time student.

    The Honors FIG constitutes a 5-credit Honors Core Course (fulfills the Honors Social Science requirement), 5-credits of English Composition (required for all UW students), and the 2-credit University Resources seminar. Students will be registered for 12 credits.

    Honors 230 B: Leadership, Democracy, and a More Thoughtful Public (5 credits, Honors Social Science)
    TTH 9:30-11:20, MGH 206
    Roger Soder, Education
    rsoder@u.washington.edu

    We will consider the following five propositions:
    1. Leadership always has a political context; leadership in a democracy is necessarily different than leadership in other political regimes.
    2. Leadership involves at its base the creation of a persuaded audience, but, more than persuasion, involves creating and sustaining a more thoughtful public, a public capable of rising above itself.
    3. A more thoughtful public must not only be created and sustained, but, given that things inevitably fall apart, must be recovered and reconstituted.
    4. Distinctions must be made in the leadership functions of (a) initiating, (b) sustaining, and c) recovering and reconstituting. What it takes for leader to sustain isn't quite the same as what it takes to initiate, and neither of these approach what it takes to recover and reconstitute when the organization or regime falls apart.
    5. Good leadership involves ethical and effective information seeking. A leader must have knowledge of what must be done, knowledge of what it takes to persuade others of what must be done (and, in persuading, creating a more thoughtful public), and knowledge of how an audience/public will respond. Only with a thorough understanding of the principles, strategies, and costs of information seeking will one be able to engage in ethical and effective leadership.

    Sources of texts will include, but not be limited to: Tocqueville, Sophocles, Machiavelli, Lincoln, Kautilya, Dostoevsky, the Tao-Te-Ching, the Huainanzi, as well as contemporary authors.

    Method of instruction: close reading of texts, coupled with short papers on texts, plus a longer (5-8 page) synthesis paper; small and large group discussions with each other and visiting scholars/practitioners.


    GEN ST 199 I2: University Resources (2 credits, C/NC)
    W 12:30-1:20
    Elizabeth Hiskey, University Honors student

    This seminar introduces students to various aspects of the University of Washington community, and includes exploration of university resources and opportunities, and academically related skill development.

    Hello! My name is Beth Hiskey and I am entering my senior year at UW. I am earning a double degree in English and French and hope to teach high school in both of these subjects after college. I studied abroad in Paris, France during autumn quarter of my sophomore year and had an amazing time living with a Parisian host family, taking classes with other UW students, and traveling around Europe on long weekends. I also lived on the Honors floor of McCarty Hall for my first two years at UW and enjoyed meeting new people and getting involved on campus. I now live off campus, but stay busy volunteering in public schools and downtown Seattle, participating in the UW Meditation Club, leading a French conversation group, and playing intramural sports (such as innertube basketball!). In my free time, I enjoy playing sports, reading, baking and eating cookies, and relaxing with my friends and roommates. I also work as a UW campus tour guide and I am excited to share my knowledge of campus and of the university as a whole with my FIG group this fall!

    Course Website/Commonview (Access restricted to students already enrolled in FIG #82): https://catalysttools.washington.edu/workspace/bhiskey/13699/

  • GEN ST 199 R: Honors Freshman Seminar
    SLN 14220 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Faustine Dufka (Honors)

    fdufka@u.washington.edu
    M
    2:30-4:20
    MGH 211B
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 15 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Special Topics
    H-Special Topics

    Incoming freshmen only!

    Hi! My name is Faustine Dufka and I am a junior majoring in medical anthropology and global health. I am following the pre-med track and I hope to apply to medical school after taking a few years off after college to travel, get a job, or simply see where life takes me. I am originally from San Francisco but have since fallen in love with Seattle and its gorgeous scenery. I love the outdoors, especially snowboarding and rock climbing. As a member of the UW soccer team, my free time is fairly limited - which is fine by me. I'm one of those people that need to have a lot going on all the time. Somehow I also find the time to cook three-course dinners several times a week, draw and paint, volunteer at UWMC Surgery Center and Children's Hospital, go to a lot of concerts, do yoga, and drink lots of tea. As a freshman, I felt like I didn't get a chance to become very involved with the Honors Program because I was so busy with classes, soccer practice, and getting accustomed to my new home, so I decided to become a peer instructor last fall. I absolutely loved the experience, met some captivating people, and learned a lot about the UW. In this seminar, I hope to help you discover everything your University has to offer, and ease your adaptation to a new learning environment. I also want this seminar to be a place where you can openly share your questions, your excitement, but also your concerns, and everything else that goes through your mind during your first quarter of college! This class is about you, and I'm here to share with you the things I've learned (and wish I'd known) while I was going through the same transition as you. I cannot wait to meet you all and have even more fun this year!

  • GEN ST 199 R1: Honors Freshman Seminar
    SLN 14221 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Colin Johnston (Honors)

    colinj2@u.washington.edu
    T
    1:30-3:20
    MGH 206
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 15 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Special Topics
    H-Special Topics

    Incoming freshmen only!

    Hi everybody! My name is Colin Johnston and I am a senior majoring in psychology. I'm not originally from Seattle, or even from the great state of Washington. Instead, I hail from Salt Lake City, Utah, arguably the coolest place ever (not really, but at least it has great skiing). As a senior in high school, I decided that I wanted to leave Utah behind and applied to all out-of-state schools, and big ones too. After being at UW for a year, I felt lost in the crowd and thought that it would be nice to be involved in a slightly smaller community in which I could meet interesting people who had interesting thoughts. I joined Honors as a late applicant and have enjoyed it thoroughly ever since. The class sizes are great and the people are greater. I really like to think and to discuss, and this community has stretched me in both of these dimensions. Besides school, I have been involved in student government, working on campus, psychological research, and have spent time abroad (with an Honors program). I also love to talk about sports, particularly the NBA (I have a blog that I write with my brother on the subject), and I consider myself a die-hard Utah Jazz fan. I'm really social and love to talk about pretty much anything from philosophy to science to relationships (which are actually what I do research on) to anything else that people want to talk about. You are about to embark on a fantastic four years here in which you will grow tremendously, both intellectually and personally. I'm glad that you have decided to do Honors here at the UW and I look forward to meeting you all!

  • GEN ST 199 R2: Honors Freshman Seminar
    SLN 14222 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Charmi Ajmera (Honors)

    cajmera@u.washington.edu
    T
    2:30-4:20
    MGH 211B
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 15 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Special Topics
    H-Special Topics

    Incoming freshmen only!

    Hello Honors Freshman! My name is Charmi Ajmera and I am a senior in the Jackson School of International Studies, minoring in South Asian Languages & Literature. I spent last summer in India for an exploration seminar and am returning to Bangalore this summer to intern for a social justice NGO and conduct field research for my Jackson School Honors thesis. I am in love with travel and can never get enough of it. I am also definitely somewhat of an adventure-addict as I greatly enjoy snowboarding, wake-boarding and skydiving...in addition to the general tomfoolery I engage in at the UW. I am very involved in the Honors Program, as I work in the office, serve as a member of the Honors Student Advisory Panel, am an Honors Peer Mentor and a Peer Instructor and I lived on the Honors floor for two years. I am also an editor for the Jackson School Journal and a leader in the Antechamber Collective, an organization committed to uniting various minority, human rights and activist organizations on campus and broadening the conversation surrounding social justice and activism to the wider UW community. I am crazy about Seattle, I love to explore, drink coffee, host dance parties and engage in scintillating academic debate. I am so thrilled you all decided to come to UW and join the Honors Program and to take this class - I can't wait to meet you all!

  • GEN ST 199 R3: Honors Freshman Seminar
    SLN 14223 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Ainsley Bourque (Honors)

    ains@u.washington.edu
    Th
    12:30-2:20
    MGH 206
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 15 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Special Topics
    H-Special Topics

    Incoming freshmen only!

    Hello! My name is Ainsley Bourque, and I am a senior in the Political Science Department, with a minor in math! I plan on becoming a teacher after I graduate - either elementary school or high school math, I don't have it quite figured out yet. Although I'm Canadian, I grew up in Kennewick, Washington, and enjoyed cross country and active involvement in our music department in high school. I came to UW as a pre-med Chemistry major, quickly changed my mind, switched majors once or twice, and finally found myself in a department (and on a career path) that I just love. I've been involved in and around the Honors program in a variety of ways since entering the UW: as a freshman, I lived on the Honors floor in Lander and served on Terry-Lander Hall Council; as a sophomore I was an RA on the Honors floor in McCarty; and as a junior I led one of these seminars. I currently live off-campus, work a part time job, volunteer at a local elementary school, and spend a lot of time reading, talking, and loving politics and international relations. In my free time (which I don't have a whole lot of!) I love to take photos, bake cupcakes, and explore Seattle. Over the last three years, I've fallen head over heals for Seattle, the UW, and the Honors Program, and I'm really looking forward to sharing my knowledge and experiences with you all!

  • GEN ST 199 R5: Honors Freshman Seminar
    SLN 14225 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Katelin Chow (Honors)

    katchow@u.washington.edu
    Alison Davis (Honors)

    adavis17@u.washington.edu
    Th
    2:30-4:20
    MGH 211E
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 15 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Special Topics
    H-Special Topics

    Incoming freshmen only!

    Hi! My name is Katelin Chow and I'm a junior majoring in Journalism and interested in Asian-American studies, creative writing, cooking and film/television. People call me Kat because when they say my full name (Kat Chow), it's sorta punny and it makes them laugh. Anyway, I was born and raised in a pretty stereotypical Connecticut town where I developed a voracious appetite for reading, writing and eating baked goods. I came to the UW because I loved Seattle and thought that attending a huge school in a different city (that wasn't Boston or NYC) would give me endless opportunities, and I joined the Honors Program (and lived on the Honors floor in Lander) because I knew that doing so would provide a smaller, more intimate community. In my two years at the UW, I've learned that college isn't just about academics--it's also about experiences outside of the classroom and the relationships you build with professors, classmates, dormmates and everyone else you meet. I work as a copy-editor, food reviewer (with a name like Kat Chow, reviewing food is kind of a must) and webcast/television producer for The Daily. Since I'm a little bit of a literary nerd, I also work for The Seattle Review, a national literary magazine that the UW's English Department publishes. Last winter quarter, I spent the entire month of February in Vancouver interning with NBC Universal at the Olympics--it was absolutely amazing, terrifying and fun! But enough about me, though, because this seminar will really be about you, and building that UW/Honors community and experience you want. I look forward to getting to know all of you fall quarter, and I hope that I can help all of you find your niches and places here at the UW. If you've got any questions about the seminar, my syllabus or even the UW/Honors Program in general, feel free to shoot me an email at katchow@uw.edu.

    Hello! My name is Alison and I'm a senior double majoring in Political Science and Economics. I grew up in Maple Valley, about an hour from Seattle. I'm into politics and current events (I find CSPAN fascinating) and I have considered attending law school after I graduate, but who knows! I work on campus in the Office of Undergraduate Academic Affairs, where I help to advance student programs and scholarships. Last summer I had the time of my life studying abroad in Rome and gallivanting around Europe, and I plan to travel more in the near future. I love to stay active and be outdoors, whether it's playing softball, tennis, golf, hiking, biking, or just walking around on a sunny day. I am also an avid Husky sports fan and try to watch as many games as possible. I always enjoy meeting new people and learning new things. Good food, good music, and good books make me happy. I am also severely addicted to coffee. Most importantly, I am so excited to be a Peer Instructor and have a lot of great ideas for the Freshman Seminar!

  • GEN ST 199 R6: Honors Freshman Seminar
    SLN 14226 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Geoffrey Morgan (Honors)

    geoffm3@u.washington.edu
    F
    11:30-1:20
    MGH 211B
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 15 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Special Topics
    H-Special Topics

    Incoming freshmen only!

    Hi! My name is Geoffrey but all my friends tend to call me Gee-off due to the British spelling of my name and because Americans seem to have the utmost difficulty in pronouncing it. Please feel free to call me by that name or by any other name that you see fit. I am a sixth year (yes that's right, sixth) majoring in Civil & Environmental Engineering, and International Studies (development track). I enjoy things that make me happy. Such things include: rock climbing, playing soccer, long distance road biking trips, hiking, blues dancing, reading, cooking random things at random times, and receiving goofy gifts from students who want a good grade in my class (cough, cough). I was born and raised in a small town called Hobart, 45 minutes outside of Seattle. My other academic experiences at the UW include serving as a hall representative for the Residence Hall Student Association, being a member of the UW Formula SAE team (we built small scale Formula 1 racecars), conducting developmental research and building a small scale water-project in a rural Chinese village. I was also one of the founding members of a non-profit organization called China Earthquake Aid that was created to aid victims of the devastating May 2008 quake. I've also studied abroad in Costa Rica, Italy, China and Guatemala. Additionally, I thoroughly enjoy sitting down with a nice cup of tea and if anyone would like to join me in this little indulgence, I would welcome them warmly.

  • Honors 100 A: Honors at the UW: Knowledge Across the Disciplines
    SLN 14588 (View Time Schedule info »)

    James Clauss (UW Honors, Classics)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
    Phone: 221-6075
    jjc@u.washington.edu
    Julie Villegas (UW Honors)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
    Phone: 543-7172
    villegas@u.washington.edu
    M
    4:30-5:50
    MGH 389
    Credits: 1, c/nc
    Limit: 150 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Special Topics
    H-Special Topics

    Required for all incoming Honors Freshmen.

    Join us this fall for an exciting lecture series developed specifically for our incoming Honors Freshmen! During the course of ten weeks you will meet Honors faculty from across campus, get a preview of exciting courses offered through the Honors Program, and learn about our experiential learning opportunities and your integrated learning portfolio.

    The unique role of the Honors Program at the UW brings students and faculty together from across campus to integrate knowledge and broaden perspectives. Whether you are interested in science, arts, humanities, or interdisciplinary studies, this series will inspire you to create your unique UW journey through the Honors Program curriculum.

    http://depts.washington.edu/uwhonors/courses/honors100/A/

  • Honors 100 B: Honors at the UW: Knowledge Across the Disciplines
    SLN 14589 (View Time Schedule info »)

    James Clauss (UW Honors, Classics)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
    Phone: 221-6075
    jjc@u.washington.edu
    Julie Villegas (UW Honors)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
    Phone: 543-7172
    villegas@u.washington.edu
    T
    4:30-5:50
    MGH 389
    Credits: 1, c/nc
    Limit: 150 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Special Topics
    H-Special Topics

    Required for all incoming Honors freshmen.

    Join us this fall for an exciting lecture series developed specifically for our incoming Honors Freshmen! During the course of ten weeks you will meet Honors faculty from across campus, get a preview of exciting courses offered through the Honors Program, and learn about our experiential learning opportunities and your integrated learning portfolio.

    The unique role of the Honors Program at the UW brings students and faculty together from across campus to integrate knowledge and broaden perspectives. Whether you are interested in science, arts, humanities, or interdisciplinary studies, this series will inspire you to create your unique UW journey through the Honors Program curriculum.

    http://depts.washington.edu/uwhonors/courses/honors100/B/

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