Course Archives

  • ARCH 351 C: Romanesque, Gothic, and Renaissance Architecture (VLPA)
    SLN 10293 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Brian McLaren (Architecture)
    Office: Arch Hall 109, Box 355720
    Phone: 543-4966
    bmclaren@u.washington.edu
    MWF
    F
    9:30-10:20
    1130-1220
    ARC 147
    GLD 440
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 18 students

    Recommended (but not required): ARCH 350.

    ADD CODE REQUIRED. Visit MGH 211.

    This course presents a survey of architecture from about 750 to about 1789. Examples are drawn from the traditions of Western and Islamic architecture during the periods usually termed the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the Baroque, with particular interest in the formation of and interaction between these traditions.

    Recommended preparation:
    This is an undergraduate upper division and graduate level class, and as such we assume you are responsible students who attend class regularly and plan ahead for assignments and exams. We recommend that you read and review the assigned material before the lectures in which it will be covered. Because the lectures do not directly follow the order of the text, it may be useful first to read an entire chapter or set of chapters in anticipation of the lectures dealing with the material covered. Although Arch 350 is not a prerequisite for the class, the material covered in it is helpful for understanding the course content of Arch 351. Required text: Marvin Trachtenberg and Isabelle Hyman, Architecture, from Prehistory to Postmodernity, Second Edition (New York: H.N. Abrams, 2002).

    Class assignments and grading:
    There will be two tests, two take-home writing assignments, and approximately 215 pages of required readings.

    Test responses will be evaluated for accuracy, thoughtfulness and clarity. Assignments will be evaluated for thoroughness, quality of ideas, and clarity of presentation (this can include writing and graphics). Each test and assignment will be given a percentage score. Final percentage grades will be calculated according to the weighting below and then converted to the University's 4.0 scale using a curve. This means that your final grade will be assessed relative to the performance of the others in this class.

    Assignment 1: 20 % of course grade Assignment 2: 20 % of course grade Test 1: 30 % of course grade Test 2: 30 % of course grade

  • ART 140 A: Honors Photography (VLPA)
    SLN 10362 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Gina R. Rymarcsuk (Art)
    MW
    8:30-11:20
    ART 116
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 20 students

    Digital camera with a minimum 3 Megapixel capacity and 512 MB memory card is required.

    ADD CODE REQUIRED. Visit MGH 211.

    ***COURSE FULL*** Visit MGH 211 to be placed on the waitlist.

    Introduction to theory, techniques, and processes of still photography. Projects stress the visual and creative potential of the medium.

    Please IGNORE the camera requirement description in the Official course description (http://www.washington.edu/students/crscat/art.html#art140). ART 140 is an introduction to the theory, techniques and processes of still photography with a DIGITAL CAMERA, which IS required. Course content will emphasize photography's potential for self-expression and creative problem solving in an artistic context. Image output will include digital prints and on-line presentation.

    Course content will be delivered through slide lectures, demonstrations, field trips, workshops, discussion, work reviews and consultations. Lab work will be largely comprised of digital image processing and basic on-line presentation.

    Please note: a digital camera with a minimum 3 Megapixel capacity and 512 MB memory card is required. Digital cameras are also available for check-out from CSC in Kane Hall. You will spend approximately $50 on printing your images; commercial printing facilities will be utilized.

    CLASS ASSIGNMENTS & GRADING
    Each student will complete photographic projects (both on-line and in print form), submit a written review and participate in group reviews. Each assignment is designed to stimulate consideration of a specific conceptual approach but may be realized with a range of creative solutions.

    Assessment is ongoing throughout the quarter. Regular group reviews of your photographic assignments are a valuable and essential component of this class. Evaluation will be based upon the conceptual development / adventurousness of your ideas and technical progress.

    In addition to the merit of your photographic work, assessment will also be based upon your level of contribution to discussion, your written review and your on-line contributions as reflections of engagement and critical thinking.

    Also, refer to the School of Art guidelines for assessment criteria, which will be handed out in class.

  • Honors 211 A: The World of Chinese-character based Writing Systems (VLPA)
    SLN 14262 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Zev Handel (Asian Languages and Literature)
    Office: 245 Gowen Hall, Box 353521
    Phone: 206 543-4863
    zhandel@u.washington.edu
    MW
    1:30-3:20
    MGH 242
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    Non-alphabetic writing systems such as Sumerian cuneiform and Egyptian hieroglyphs have fascinated Europeans for hundreds of years. But it is only in East Asia that we find such writing systems in use in modern times. Chinese characters (aka kanji) are employed in written Chinese and written Japanese, and were until relatively recently also widely used in Korea and Vietnam.

    This course examines the origin and development of Chinese characters within China; the various strategies used to adapt them for writing different languages in Asia; and their current status in written Chinese, Korean, and Japanese. In order to understand how Chinese characters have functioned over the last three millennia, we will explore the relationship between linguistic features and writing systems, and discuss the different linguistic structures of several Asian languages. Along the way we will explore such questions as:

    - How are Chinese characters structured, and how do they represent language?
    - What can Chinese character-based writing systems tell us in general about the nature of writing and its relationship to spoken language?
    - Is a universal writing system possible?
    - Are alphabetic writing systems superior to character-based systems? If so, why have Chinese characters survived into the modern era?
    - What do popular views of writing imply about our conceptions of the fundamental nature not only of language, but of reality itself?

    The course is open to all students regardless of language background; no prior knowledge of Chinese characters, Asian languages, or linguistics is necessary. Curiosity, enthusiasm, and a willingness to engage with the unfamiliar are the only prerequisites. There is no textbook for the course. Instead, we will read a variety of articles, excerpts, and reference materials, some of which will be collected in a course reading packet.

    Classes will involve a mixture of lecture and group discussion. Students will be expected to read in depth and engage in classroom discussions of course material. Grading will be based on class participation, homework assignments, written responses to readings, and one or more short papers.

  • Honors 241 A: Cultivating Creativity (VLPA)
    SLN 19606 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Iain Robertson (Landscape Architecture)
    Office: 348F Gould Hall, Box 355734
    Phone: 543-9246
    iainmr@u.washington.edu
    Tammy Tasker (Education)
    Office: 122E Miller Hall
    tqtasker@uw.edu
    MW
    F
    11:30-12:20
    10:30-12:20
    MGH 206
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 15 students

    Cultivating Creativity explores the subject of creativity in an applied, hands-on manner not abstractly or theoretically. In other words, Cultivating Creativity explores your own creativity not creativity as an academic subject. Explorations take the form of brief and longer exercises some in, some out of, class. Exercises will be supplemented by discussion and reflection sessions, and sporadic reading. Like all true explorations the class, and its work, is experimental. One gets out of the experiment what one puts into it. Output mirrors input. A bump on a log remains a bump; a bud grows, puts out leaves and, eventually, perhaps years later, blossoms. Thus the course requires active engagement, a willingness to try the unusual, to step outside one's mental comfort zone, to make mistakes and learn from them, to have fun with your education while
    working hard.

  • Honors 241 B: Cultivating Creativity (VLPA)
    SLN 19609 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Iain Robertson (Landscape Architecture)
    Office: 348F Gould Hall, Box 355734
    Phone: 543-9246
    iainmr@u.washington.edu
    Tammy Tasker (Education)
    Office: 122E Miller Hall
    tqtasker@uw.edu
    M
    W
    F
    1:30-2:20
    2:30-3:20
    1:30-3:20
    MGH 206
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 15 students

    Cultivating Creativity explores the subject of creativity in an applied, hands-on manner not abstractly or theoretically. In other words, Cultivating Creativity explores your own creativity not creativity as an academic subject. Explorations take the form of brief and longer exercises some in, some out of, class. Exercises will be supplemented by discussion and reflection sessions, and sporadic reading. Like all true explorations the class, and its work, is experimental. One gets out of the experiment what one puts into it. Output mirrors input. A bump on a log remains a bump; a bud grows, puts out leaves and, eventually, perhaps years later, blossoms. Thus the course requires active engagement, a willingness to try the unusual, to step outside one's mental comfort zone, to make mistakes and learn from them, to have fun with your education while
    working hard.

  • FISH 101 AH: Water & Society (I&S / NW)
    SLN 13787 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Daniel Schindler (Aquatic & Fishery Sciences)

    Phone: 206 616-6724
    deschind@u.washington.edu
    Th
    1:30-3:20
    FSH 107
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students

    Honors section. Must also register for lecture: FISH 101 A, SLN 13781. See Time Schedule for day/time information.

    Water will be the Oil of the 21st century and beyond- the invaluable commodity that determines the wealth of nations, and the health of humans and the freshwater ecosystems upon which we depend. Mark Twain once said "Whiskey is for drinking; water is for fighting over." We all know too well the importance of clean, fresh water; but do you know the real reasons why water shortages have led to environmental degradation and intense social conflicts throughout the globe? Many of the most dangerous human diseases are water-borne; how are society's actions exacerbating these? Why is the biodiversity of freshwater ecosystems the most imperiled on the planet? Is Seattle really a 'wet' place or are we running out of sustainable water supplies? This course will examine these and many related questions to improve our understanding of human dependencies and effects on freshwater ecosystems.

    Student learning goals:
    As a result of this course, students will have a strong understanding of the tight linkages between water, the environment, and human society. Specifically, this course aims to i) introduce students to contemporary issues and challenges in freshwater ecology and resource management; ii) develop student's skills to critically evaluate scientific information; iii) develop student's writing skills to effectively communicate issues to a variety of audiences; iv) increase awareness that human existence depends on a supply of clean and abundant water; and v) explore ways that individuals and society can reduce their impacts on water resources.

  • Honors 392 A: Science and the Master Narrative (I&S / NW)
    SLN 14273 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Maynard Olson (Medicine - Genome Sciences)

    mvo@u.washington.edu
    Malcolm Parks (Communications)
    Office: 340C Communications Bldg, Box 353740
    Phone: 206 543-2660
    macp@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    1:30-3:20
    MGH 228
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 17 students

    Cross-listed with Honors 221 D (SLN 14266).

    This course will explore a profound turn in human thought-the emergence of a master scientific narrative of the human experience. Humans have constructed, largely during the past 200 years, a comprehensive story of our physical, biological, and social origins that makes strong claims of universality and objectivity. This story continues to expand with new scientific discoveries. Sometimes it draws upon, but more often displaces, earlier narrative traditions embedded in human culture. The scientific narrative sweeps across billions of calendar years of history and billions of light years of space to portray contemporary human experience as a tiny speck in the space-time manifold of the universe. We will explore both the content and meaning of this narrative, drawing on the voices of scientists, artists, poets, myth, religion, and the full richness of the humanities. There will be a central focus on ways in which the scientific master narrative influences contemporary discourse: for example, the same narrative has been invoked in recent books to argue that humans are likely to be able to innovate their way out of current planetary-scale challenges (e.g., exhaustion of natural resources, environmental degradation, global warming) without major changes in behavior and also to argue the opposite position that continuation of current trends will lead to disaster. The course is designed to be accessible to, and relevant to the interests of, students with any major.

    When students complete this class, they should be able to:
    - Articulate a deep historical context for understanding major current social and environmental trends (e.g., global warming, advancement of technology, population growth, human health, and social structure).
    - Describe current social challenges such as the quests for environmental sustainability, international development, economic and political stability, and racial justice as the result of a chain of human developments and choices stretching back tens of thousands of years.
    - Think creatively about how different forms of discourse (e.g., science and religion) coexist and communicate with one another.
    - Describe both science and humanism as cultural narratives.
    - Identify the limits of science and other traditions as sources of a truly universal " master" narrative.

    Expectations / Assignments: The class will be structured as discussion-oriented seminar. Readings will include Ronald Wright' s A Short History of Progress, Matt Ridley' s The Rational Optimist, and numerous selections from other authors organized into a Course Pack. Active participation in class discussions, including presentation of specific topics, is expected. Grades will be based on class participation and assigned essays.

  • Honors 394 A: Comparative Ideologies: Human Rights Movements (VLPA / I&S)
    SLN 19507 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Clare Bright (Gender Studies (GWSS))
    Office: B-110 Padelford, Box 354345
    Phone: (206) 543-6900
    cbright@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    12:30-2:20
    THO 231
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students

    An exploration of the philosophies which have shaped the Black Liberation Movement, the Feminist Movement and the Gay Rights Movement in the United States. We will begin by looking at the ideological roots of these movements in earlier centuries then trace their development through their 20th century manifestations. Similarities and differences in these social theories will be analyzed along with the historical contexts in which they were and are invoked. We will also consider the political ramifications of utilizing particular paradigms to argue for social change.

    COURSE OBJECTIVES:
    To provide an overview of the sociopolitical philosophies which underlie the Feminist, African/American, and Gay movements in the United States.
    To situate these paradigms in their historical context.
    To assess which theories, concepts and arguments transcend the particular features of the individual movements and apply across their differences and which do not.
    To develop the students' ability to analyze, formulate and defend theory.
    To assist students in examining their own sociopolitical beliefs and goals.

    REQUIRED TEXTS:
    Black Power Ideologies, John McCartney
    Readings Packets (available at Prof. Copy, 42nd & U. Way)

    COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
    Class participation (30%): Be present and prepared for discussion. This means having each day's readings completed by class time and coming with some ideas about them and about any assigned questions. Participation includes both thoughtful comments and active, respectful listening and an appropriate balance between them. One absence is permitted without affecting your participation grade.

    Weekly response papers (30%): Each week questions or topics related to the readings will be given on which you will write approximately 2 typewritten pages. Graded credit/no-credit.

    Group project (15%): Guidelines to be announced.

    Final exam (take-home essay) (25%)

  • Honors 394 B: How to Read, Write and Speak (VLPA / I&S)
    SLN 19508 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Eric Liu (Education)
    epliu@msn.com
    TTh
    12:30-2:20
    MGH 206
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    You may think you know how to do these things, but in this fun, practical course you will sharpen your skills in the role of citizen. Students will spend intensive time learning three core skills of engaged citizenship: how to read the media (dissecting text articles and audio/video clips to determine the agendas of the protagonists and of the journalists, to detect bias, to see how issues have been framed); how to write an argument (by composing essays and op-eds on social and political issues and by assessing models of effective written advocacy); and how to deliver a speech (by practicing and getting critiqued on short persuasive speeches). Students will tie all three skills together by working collaboratively on projects that involve them in current civic life and the political process. No special experience required, but a willingness to participate actively and collaboratively is a must.

  • Honors 394 C: Teaching What You Know (VLPA / I&S)
    SLN 20028 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Frances McCue (Writer in Residence, UW Honors)
    frances@francesmccue.com
    MW
    10:30-12:20
    PAR 106
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    In what situations is expertise a useful commodity? Does knowledge include the awareness of how to best use it? How do we pass it on?

    In this seminar we'll learn the basics of teaching. We will also use writing as a method to learn how to reflect upon our learning about pedagogy. By practicing different methods of instruction and by reading and writing vigorously about what we're learning, we'll be able to facilitate groups, teach one-to-one, and discuss learning styles. The outcome of this seminar will be for each student to have a developed plan to transmit his or her knowledge to people outside of the university. If possible students should plan on registering for a spring quarter service learning experience.

  • BIOC 441 AD: Honors Biochemistry (NW)
    SLN 10977 (View Time Schedule info »)

    William Parson (Biochemistry)
    Office: J-061C Health Sciences, Box 357350
    Phone: 206 543-1743
    parsonb@u.washington.edu
    W
    2:30-3:20
    HST T478
    Credits: 4
    Limit: 30 students

    Add codes available from Biochem dept. Contact advisers@chem.washington.edu for information.
    BIOC 441 Honors section. Students must also register for Bioc 441 A lecture (SLN 10973). See Time Schedule for day/time information.

    Biochemistry and molecular biology (with quiz sections) for undergraduate students in molecular and cellular biology, for biochemistry majors, and graduate students in other science departments.

  • CHEM 155 A: Honors General Chemistry (NW)
    SLN 11712 (View Time Schedule info »)

    David Ginger (Chemistry)

    Phone: 206 685-2331
    ginger@chem.washington.edu
    MWF
    2:30-3:20
    BAG 261
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 72 students

    Add codes available through Chemistry dept.
    Prerequisite: 2.2 in Honors CHEM 145.
    Students must also sign up for Section AA, AB, or AC. See Time Schedule for day/time information.

    Continuation of CHEM 145. Includes laboratory. Together CHEM 145 and 155 cover material in CHEM 142, 152, and 162. No more than the number of credits indicated can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: CHEM 152, 155 (5 credits); 145, 155, 162 (10 credits).

  • CHEM 336 A: Honors Organic Chemistry (NW)
    SLN 11831 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Michael Gelb (Chemistry)

    Phone: 206 543-7142
    gelb@chem.washington.edu
    MWThF
    10:30-11:20
    BAG 261
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 72 students

    Add codes available through Chemistry dept.
    Prerequisite: 2.2 in Honors CHEM 335

    For chemistry majors and otherwise qualified students planning three or more quarters of organic chemistry. Structure, nomenclature, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Theory and mechanism of organic reactions. Studies of biomolecules. No more than 4 credits can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: CHEM 238, CHEM 336.

  • CSE 143 A: Computer Programming II (NW)
    SLN 12286 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Martin Stepp (Computer Science)
    Office: CSE636
    Phone: (206) 685-2181
    stepp@cs.washington.edu
    MWF
    3:30-4:20
    KNE 120
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 440 students

    Students MUST participate in additional Honors discussion seminars each week to earn Honors Natural Science credit. See instructor Week 1 for more details.
    See Time Schedule for section day/time information.

    Continuation of CSE 142. Concepts of data abstraction and encapsulation including stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, recursion, instruction to complexity and use of predefined collection classes. Prerequisite: CSE 142.

  • Honors 221 A: Microbial Ecology (NW)
    SLN 14263 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Claire Horner-Devine (Aquatic and Fishery Sciences)

    mchd@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    9:30-11:20
    Room TBA
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 12 students

    Cross-listed with FISH 221 A (SLN 13788).

    his course is for UW or COFS honors students OR students in SAFS or Ocean who have a 3.3 gpa and are interested in possibly doing departmental honors. If this description fits you, contact Lin Murdock (linm@u). Microbes are the oldest, most abundant and diverse group of organisms on Earth. In this course students will gain an understanding of the fundamentals of ecology and evolution by exploring the role of microbes in disease, ecosystem functioning and extreme environments.

    We will begin with an introduction to the incredible diversity of microbes and methods used to study these communities of tiny organisms. The rest of the quarter will be comprised of three units:

    1) Microbes and disease: We will explore the current understanding of the role that microbial species and communities play in diseases of humans, plants and animals.

    2) Microbes and ecosystems: Next, we will explore the role that microbes play in the functioning of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. We will then examine the impact that anthropogenic changes, such as invasive species and climate change, have on microbial community structure and function.

    3) Early evolution and microbes at the extremes: We will investigate the ability of microorganisms to live in extreme environments such as deep sea vents, geothermal hotsprings, Antarctic ice and possibly on other planets as well as what insights we can gain about early evolution.

    The course will be comprised of lectures, team presentations, discussions and an independent poster project. The readings in this course are key to developing a strong foundation for learning to think like a scientist and for the poster project. Basic microbiology concepts will be covered by selected readings from the textbook "Brock Biology of Microorganisms." Primary literature and secondary source articles (posted on the class website and handed out in class) will provide examples of the state of current research on these topics. Reading discussions will be presented and facilitated by teams of students.

  • Honors 221 B: Evolution & Human Behavior (NW)
    SLN 14264 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Jon Herron (Biology)
    Office: 205D Burke Museum, Box 351800
    Phone: (206) 547-6330
    herronjc@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    10:30-12:20
    MGH 248
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students

    The theory of evolution by natural selection is the underlying theme that unites all fields of biology. In this course we will cover the basic principles of evolution, explore ways in which evolutionary theory can be applied to human biology and behavior, and consider how evolutionary thinking might guide the development of social policy. We will consider questions such as these:

    -Why are women and men different?
    -Which is more egalitarian: monogamy or polygamy?
    -Why do step-parents and step-children often have more conflicted relationships than biological parents and biological children?
    -When do people cooperate, when are they selfish, and why?
    -What can we do to reduce the rate of spousal abuse and homicide?

    My goal is to help students learn selection thinking; that is, to help them learn to reason like evolutionary biologists. I hope to help students pose questions, formulate hypotheses, design experiments, and critically evaluate the quality of evidence. After taking this course, students will be able to:

    -Apply evolutionary theory to human interactions, especially those involving social conflict, and make predictions about how the divergent interests of the parties involved will affect their behavior.
    -Design observational studies and experiments to test these predictions.
    -Interpret and critically evaluate graphs and tables showing data on behavioral patterns in humans and animals.
    -Provide evolutionary interpretations of various human social institutions, such as laws, wills, and social policies.

  • Honors 221 C: Evolution & Human Behavior (NW)
    SLN 14265 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Jon Herron (Biology)
    Office: 205D Burke Museum, Box 351800
    Phone: (206) 547-6330
    herronjc@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    12:30-2:20
    MGH 242
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students

    The theory of evolution by natural selection is the underlying theme that unites all fields of biology. In this course we will cover the basic principles of evolution, explore ways in which evolutionary theory can be applied to human biology and behavior, and consider how evolutionary thinking might guide the development of social policy. We will consider questions such as these:

    -Why are women and men different?
    -Which is more egalitarian: monogamy or polygamy?
    -Why do step-parents and step-children often have more conflicted relationships than biological parents and biological children?
    -When do people cooperate, when are they selfish, and why?
    -What can we do to reduce the rate of spousal abuse and homicide?

    My goal is to help students learn selection thinking; that is, to help them learn to reason like evolutionary biologists. I hope to help students pose questions, formulate hypotheses, design experiments, and critically evaluate the quality of evidence. After taking this course, students will be able to:

    -Apply evolutionary theory to human interactions, especially those involving social conflict, and make predictions about how the divergent interests of the parties involved will affect their behavior.
    -Design observational studies and experiments to test these predictions.
    -Interpret and critically evaluate graphs and tables showing data on behavioral patterns in humans and animals.
    -Provide evolutionary interpretations of various human social institutions, such as laws, wills, and social policies.

  • Honors 221 D: Science and the Master Narrative (NW)
    SLN 14266 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Malcolm Parks (Communications)
    Office: 340C Communications Bldg, Box 353740
    Phone: 206 543-2660
    macp@u.washington.edu
    Maynard Olson (Medicine - Genome Sciences)

    mvo@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    1:30-3:20
    MGH 228
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 18 students

    Cross-listed with Honors 392 A (SLN 14273).

    This course will explore a profound turn in human thought-the emergence of a master scientific narrative of the human experience. Humans have constructed, largely during the past 200 years, a comprehensive story of our physical, biological, and social origins that makes strong claims of universality and objectivity. This story continues to expand with new scientific discoveries. Sometimes it draws upon, but more often displaces, earlier narrative traditions embedded in human culture. The scientific narrative sweeps across billions of calendar years of history and billions of light years of space to portray contemporary human experience as a tiny speck in the space-time manifold of the universe. We will explore both the content and meaning of this narrative, drawing on the voices of scientists, artists, poets, myth, religion, and the full richness of the humanities. There will be a central focus on ways in which the scientific master narrative influences contemporary discourse: for example, the same narrative has been invoked in recent books to argue that humans are likely to be able to innovate their way out of current planetary-scale challenges (e.g., exhaustion of natural resources, environmental degradation, global warming) without major changes in behavior and also to argue the opposite position that continuation of current trends will lead to disaster. The course is designed to be accessible to, and relevant to the interests of, students with any major.

    When students complete this class, they should be able to:
    - Articulate a deep historical context for understanding major current social and environmental trends (e.g., global warming, advancement of technology, population growth, human health, and social structure).
    - Describe current social challenges such as the quests for environmental sustainability, international development, economic and political stability, and racial justice as the result of a chain of human developments and choices stretching back tens of thousands of years.
    - Think creatively about how different forms of discourse (e.g., science and religion) coexist and communicate with one another.
    - Describe both science and humanism as cultural narratives.
    - Identify the limits of science and other traditions as sources of a truly universal " master" narrative.

    Expectations / Assignments: The class will be structured as discussion-oriented seminar. Readings will include Ronald Wright' s A Short History of Progress, Matt Ridley' s The Rational Optimist, and numerous selections from other authors organized into a Course Pack. Active participation in class discussions, including presentation of specific topics, is expected. Grades will be based on class participation and assigned essays.

  • Honors 221 E: Climatic Extremes (NW)
    SLN 19668 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Paul Johnson (Oceanography)
    Office: 256 Marine Science Bldg, Box 357940
    Phone: 206 543-8474
    johnson@ocean.washington.edu
    Paul Quay (Oceanography)
    Office: 417 Ocean Science Bldg, Box 355351
    Phone: 206 685-8061
    pdquay@u.washington.edu
    MWThF
    11:30-12:20
    OTB 205
    Credits: 4
    Limit: 9 students

    Cross-listed with OCEAN 450 (SLN 16663).

    This course examines the earth's past for evidence of extreme climate conditions in order to help understand possible future climate changes. For example, climate conditions that occurred during the Neo-Proterozoic (Snowball Earth: 750 to 550 million years ago), Cretaceous Hothouse (100 million years ago), Pleistocene Icehouse (1 million years ago) will be compared to the Present Greenhouse climate.

    The climate impacts resulting from natural variations in solar insolation, changes in ocean and atmospheric circulation, atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, plate tectonics, evolution of vascular plants will be discussed.

    One class period per week will be spent in an active class discussion of an important paper. There will be weekly take home problem sets that will demonstrate the quantitative application of climate concepts.

    Honors students will be responsible for additional research on a climate-related topic, performed independently with guidance from the instructors. Students will present their research to the class and lead a class discussion on the topic.

    LEARNING GOALS
    - Learn about the major climate changes that occurred on earth in the past.
    - Learn how preserved records climate 'proxies' are used to reconstruct past climate change.
    - Understand key processes and feedbacks in the earth's system that controlled past climate changes.
    - Learn how human activity has perturbed current climate on earth.
    - Examine predictions of likely future climate change.

  • Honors 396 A: Discussion Supplement to Biology 200: Thinking like a scientist (NW)
    SLN 14276 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Jocelyn Wright (Pathology)

    Phone: 206 616-4796
    jhw5@u.washington.edu
    Th
    9:30-11:20
    MGH 097
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 20 students

    Email laurah13@uw.edu for add code.

    Must be concurrently enrolled in BIOL 200.

    In this honors section, we explore the topics covered in BIOL200, focusing on current research, controversies and applications. We will not review class or lab material, but will use the week's BIOL200 lectures as a starting point for discussions. A sample of discussions from previous quarters: influenza virus, vaccines and autism, cloning and stem cells, how human cognitive development is affected by gender.

    Weekly readings will be posted on a website, and must be read before class. In class, we'll do group activities, discussions, and short student presentations. Credit is awarded for completing the weekly reading, attending and participating in all sessions, and writing a term paper of about 5 pages (with references). Concurrent registration in BIOL200 is required.

  • Honors 396 B: Discussion Supplement to Biology 200: Thinking like a scientist (NW)
    SLN 14277 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Jocelyn Wright (Pathology)

    Phone: 206 616-4796
    jhw5@u.washington.edu
    Th
    1:30-3:20
    MGH 295
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 20 students

    ***COURSE FULL***

    Must be concurrently enrolled in BIOL 200.

    In this honors section, we explore the topics covered in BIOL200, focusing on current research, controversies and applications. We will not review class or lab material, but will use the week's BIOL200 lectures as a starting point for discussions. A sample of discussions from previous quarters: influenza virus, vaccines and autism, cloning and stem cells, how human cognitive development is affected by gender.

    Weekly readings will be posted on a website, and must be read before class. In class, we'll do group activities, discussions, and short student presentations. Credit is awarded for completing the weekly reading, attending and participating in all sessions, and writing a term paper of about 5 pages (with references). Concurrent registration in BIOL200 is required.

  • Honors 396 C: Discussion Supplement to Biology 220: Thinking like a scientist (NW)
    SLN 14278 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Benjamin Smarr (Biology)
    smarrb@u.washington.edu
    Th
    1:30-3:20
    MGH 278
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 20 students

    Must be concurrently enrolled in BIOL 220.

    We will discuss general models that are fundamental to understanding physiology in animals and plants and apply these models to topics discussed in class, review literature on muscle physiology, discuss current topic in plant physiology and students will prepare a power point talk on a group of plants or animals that live in an extreme environment.

  • MATH 125 H: Honors Calculus with Analytical Geometry II (NW)
    SLN 15460 (View Time Schedule info »)

    MWF
    10:30-11:20
    ARC 160
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 60 students

    Add codes are available from Math Department.
    Students must have completed Honors Math 124.
    Students must register for section HA or HB. Check Time Schedule for day/time information.

    Second quarter in the calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes integral calculus. Emphasizes applications and problem solving using the tools of calculus.

  • MATH 135 A: Accelerated (Honors) Calculus (NW)
    SLN 15489 (View Time Schedule info »)

    John Palmieri (Mathematics)
    Office: C538 PDL, Box 354350
    Phone: 206 543-1785
    jpalmier@u.washington.edu
    MTWThF
    10:30-11:20
    SIG 226
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 35 students

    Add code available from Math Department only, C-36 Padelford.
    Students must have completed Honors MATH 134.

    Covers the material of MATH 124, 125, 126; 307, 308, 318. First year of a two-year accelerated sequence. May receive advanced placement (AP) credit for 125 after taking 135. For students with above average preparation, interest, and ability in mathematics.

  • MATH 335 A: Accelerated (Honors) Advanced Calculus (NW)
    SLN 15530 (View Time Schedule info »)

    James Morrow (Mathematics)
    Office: C439 Padelford, Box 354350
    Phone: 206 543-1161
    morrow@math.washington.edu
    MTWThF
    10:30-11:20
    LOW 115
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    Add code available from Math Department only, C-36 Padelford.
    Students must have completed Honors MATH 334.

    Introduction to proofs and rigor; uniform convergence, Fourier series and partial differential equations, vector calculus, complex variables. Students who complete this sequence are not required to take MATH 309, 324, 326, 327, 328, and 427. Second year of an accelerated two-year sequence; prepares students for senior-level mathematics courses. Prerequisite: 2.0 in MATH 334.

  • PHYS 122 B: Honors Electromagnetism and Oscillatory Motion (NW)
    SLN 17336 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Paula Heron (Physics)
    Office: C208B Physics-Astronomy Bldg., Box 351560
    Phone: 206 543-3894
    pheron@phys.washington.edu
    MWF
    9:30-10:20
    PAA A110
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 66 students

    Contact Prof. Heron at pheron@uw.edu for add code.
    Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 122 quiz section and lab required. See Time Schedule for section & lab info.

    Basic principles of electromagnetism, the mechanics of oscillatory motion, and experiments in these topics for physical science and engineering majors. Lecture tutorial and lab components must all be taken to receive credit. Credit is not given for both PHYS 115 and PHYS 122.

  • GEOG 331 AC: Global Poverty & Care (I&S)
    SLN 19543 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Victoria Lawson (Geography)
    Phone: 543-5196
    lawson@u.washington.edu
    F
    10:30-11:20
    SMI 415C
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 20 students

    Honors section. Must also register for lecture: GEOG 331 A (SLN 14029). See Time Schedule for day/time information.

    ADD CODE REQUIRED. Visit MGH 211.

    ***COURSE FULL*** Visit MGH 211 to be added to the waitlist for this course.

    Explores the causes and patterns of global poverty, and the urgent need for studies of care in both academic work and public policy. Considers the possibilities and challenges of caring across distance, and ways to respectfully engage with people in different places.

  • Honors 231 A: Political & Moral Context of Education & Schooling (I&S)
    SLN 14267 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Roger Soder (Education)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 353600
    rsoder@u.washington.edu
    MW
    9:30-11:20
    MGH 206
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    Schooling is a major enculturating function of every society. It is a deeply embedded function in a society, so deeply embedded that it is often difficult to see how schooling works, and it is difficult to raise critical questions about its purpose, design, and functions. As the anthropologist Bronislaw Malinowski said, nothing is as difficult to see as the obvious.

    This difficulty is experienced by many undergraduate students. Undergraduate students have spent more time in formal schooling agencies than in any other agency in society (other than the family). Their very familiarity with schooling is often an obstacle. Honors students in particular most likely have done very well in school: they know how to do school, as it were. But to do well in school is not the same as understanding the social, economic, and political functions of schooling.

    The purpose of this course, then, is to deepen our fundamental understanding of the schooling function in American society. We will identify and address some of the major perennial and critical questions of the schooling through reading and discussion of classic and current texts. Those questions will include:

    - How do we make useful distinctions between "education" and "schooling" and why are these distinctions important?
    - What is the rule of public schools in helping to create and sustain conditions for an authentic and healthy democratic regime? And, moreover, what does "public" mean here?
    - Should schools reflect our society as it is in terms of socioeconomic order and distribution of wealth, or should schools-in the words of sociologist George Counts-"help build a new social order?"
    -Why do some people to better than others in school? What are some of the critical variables?
    -How should schools deal with the tension between liberty and order in a democratic regime? And how should schools deal with the tension between liberty and equality?
    -What is the historical context of the schooling function in the U.S.?
    -How might we usefully frame discussions of democracy, equality, and access to schooling?
    - What are the socio-economic and political relationships between K-12 schooling and higher education?

    Readings will include selections from Aristotle, Quintilian, Montaigne, Whitehead, Richard Hofstadter, and George Counts, as well as contemporary authors on the politics of schooling in terms of race, gender, and social class. We also have three guest speakers.

    Requirements: Short (1-2 page) papers will be prepared for most of the readings; one longer (8-9 page) final paper summarizing and discussing the whole. No formal final exam. Numerical grading on a 4.0 scale. Given that class discussion is very important, attendance is critical.

    Pedagogy: close reading of texts; small and large group discussion; some presentations by the instructor; guest speakers.

  • Honors 231 B: Encounters of an Unworldly Civilization (I&S)
    SLN 14268 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Clarke Speed (Anthropology)

    landogo@u.washington.edu
    MW
    11:30-1:20
    MGH 231
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 40 students

    There is nothing so strange in a strange land as the stranger that comes to stay. This course is a critical hermeneutic of the Western self in close encounter with the other. As an exploration in radical alterity, the critical gaze through the Honors experience of tourism and travel, study abroad, exploration seminars, all kinds of research, the seeming distinctions between mission and mercenary work, on into ideas about development, and national political interests. Our goal is to privilege nothing; simply, to feel horror in our acts of global advocacy. We start with an interrogation of the Enlightenment concept of the autonomous individual. Then we send that individual into non-Western places. We then plow Western Culture-History's need for others through a number of encounter narratives about Africa. This may reveal the reality of our Western consumption of African differences that reproduce an other outside the linear space of so-called European enlightenment. While experience of africa helps to imagine this new experiential terrain, we all shake the fabric of the Honors self to see if historical and cultural differences fall out. We gather the debris and ask questions. There are too many questions, and too few answers. Examples illustrate. Why is encounter with difference a problem? Can we ever find the doorway or window of knowing about Africa? Who actually confronts their own heart-of-darkness? As course in Alterity and Divinity Studies, our existential point of departure is to dig deeply into our own well-cloaked theology to uncover a taxonomy of Progress. Such progress can be from God, or from Science, Liberalism, or extreme Individualism. The key point is that such progress is a methodology of rationality and technology externalizing a Faith in a linear path of civilization-making. Those in civilization have legitimate right to experientially consume the so-called non-linear and irrational world of under, or less than, developed others. As we turn new ground on this I-consuming the world, we begin to conjure our own indeterminacy and paradox. Simply, where social and historical right masks the actual violence of self-in-history. Such horizons crumble as the horror of self is now seen as simple self-interest. I assume only a few of you will venture to Africa. But you may venture elsewhere. This quarter is not some futile search for God. As a hopeful zero sum point, we encounter otherwise-than-being to generate our first value of human dignity and grace. As a class with no right answers, and no pretension to knowing, we muck about using theory from Buber, Conrad, Heidegger, Kingsolver, Levinas, and Mudimbe to create a radical theology of abjection in human encounters. Texts include Otherwise Than Being (2006), Heart of Darkness (2004), Poisonwood Bible (1999), and The Idea of Africa (1994). There are three analytical concept papers, student precis and presentations, and graded participation.

  • Honors 231 C: Global Conflict, Global Health & Identity (I&S)
    SLN 14269 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Stephen Sulzbacher (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences)
    Office: Children's Hospital & Medical Center, Box 359300
    Phone: 206 987-2164
    sis@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    10:30-12:20
    MGH 206
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    This course examines the contemporary use of violence by States and non-state agents. Students will be asked to consider whether Peace is even possible among modern civilizations. We will ask whether there can be a "just war." We will use the Israeli-Palestinian conflict as a primary example of how local beliefs and metaphors dictate international relations. We will use a computer game Peacemaker to study real events in the Middle East conflict and look at how choices by those leaders affect outcomes. Using foreign media sources, we will try to understand current conflicts in the Middle East from the viewpoint of the insurgent enemy and of the civilian noncombatant.

    Who are our allies and adversaries in the Middle East? Our study of "The Girls of Riyadh" will contrast the lives of affluent young people in an orthodox Muslim culture with our own. We'll ask if the Girls of Riyadh can help us better understand our own identities and belief systems.

    Student presentations will guide the class study of global health, political economics and poverty issues in the third world. Finally, we will try to predict who will be US enemies and adversaries in the conflicts of next 25 years.

    Course requirements: You will each produce a "white paper/project" of about 20-25 pages, on a major global problem. Successive drafts of this project will be due
    regularly as the course progresses, so you can get constructive feedback from me and your classmates. This project will be 60% of your grade. I encourage 2-4 students collaborating on the major project. There will be one quiz on assigned readings midway through the quarter, worth about 20% of your grade. There will also be a 2-4 page "briefing outline" assigned on a contemporary issue, accounting for the balance of your grade. Classroom participation also counts.

    Primary Texts:
    1 ) Betts, RK. Conflict after the Cold War. New York:Pearson, Longman, 2008.
    2 ) Ṣāniʻ, Rajāʾ ʻAbd Allāh (translated by Rajaa Alsanea and Marilyn Booth). Girls of Riyadh New York : Penguin Press, 2007
    3 ) http://blogs.cgdev.org/open_book/ - a virtual book on microfinance by David Roodman.

  • Honors 231 D: Philosophical Reflections on Religion (I&S)
    SLN 14270 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Ken Clatterbaugh (Philosophy)
    Office: 345B Savery, Box 353350
    Phone: (206) 543-5086
    clatter@u.washington.edu
    MW
    11:30-1:20
    MGH 242
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students

    This course looks at a variety of topics that have been of interest in the philosophy of religion. Philosophy and religion have always had an uneasy relationship. Religious thinkers believe that philosophy tends to be overly skeptical. Philosophers tend to view religion as overly superstitious. Topics include what is religion, what is the relationship between science and religion, what is the relationship between religion and morality, how can religion account for the existence of evil, and what, if any, are the limits of religious toleration. The objective of the course is to allow a student to think through these questions in the light of her or his belief system and having done that to be able to clearly express the conclusions of that thought process.

  • SIS 201 AI: Making of the 21st Century (I&S)
    SLN 18031 (View Time Schedule info »)

    David Bachman (International Studies)
    Office: 338 Thomson, Box 353650
    Phone: 206 685-1945
    dbachman@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    1:30-2:20
    LOW 222
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students

    Must be concurrently enrolled in SIS 201 A (SLN 18022).

    ADD CODE REQUIRED. Visit MGH 211.

    Provides a historical understanding of the twentieth century and major global issues today. Focuses on interdisciplinary social science theories, methods, and information relating to global processes and on developing analytical and writing skills to engage complex questions of causation and effects of global events and forces.

    SIS 201 is intended to prepare students to think critically about the world and formulate their own ideas about important international issues. The course covers the major events and trends of the twentieth century, including the world wars and the Cold War, decolonization, democratization, and approaches to economic development; and current issues that stem from twentieth-century processes, such as globalization, failed states, the "war on terror," and changes in the international distribution of power.

    COURSE OBJECTIVES:
    Learn to think critically about complex issues and identify connections between events
    Write an analytical paper that formulates a causal argument about political or social phenomena

    METHOD OF INSTRUCTION:
    Lecture 3 times a week, plus two sections a week.

    RECOMMENDED PREPARATION:
    Reading a newspaper daily.

    COURSE ASSIGNMENTS & GRADING:
    Reading of 150-200 pages per week, several short papers and a longer research paper.
    Several short papers, one research paper, class participation, final exam.

  • SIS 201 AJ: Making of the 21st Century (I&S)
    SLN 18032 (View Time Schedule info »)

    David Bachman (International Studies)
    Office: 338 Thomson, Box 353650
    Phone: 206 685-1945
    dbachman@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    11:30-12:20
    LOW 222
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students

    Must be concurrently enrolled in SIS 201 A (SLN 18022).

    ADD CODE REQUIRED. Visit MGH 211.

    ***COURSE FULL*** Visit MGH 211 to be placed on the waitlist.

    Provides a historical understanding of the twentieth century and major global issues today. Focuses on interdisciplinary social science theories, methods, and information relating to global processes and on developing analytical and writing skills to engage complex questions of causation and effects of global events and forces.

    SIS 201 is intended to prepare students to think critically about the world and formulate their own ideas about important international issues. The course covers the major events and trends of the twentieth century, including the world wars and the Cold War, decolonization, democratization, and approaches to economic development; and current issues that stem from twentieth-century processes, such as globalization, failed states, the "war on terror," and changes in the international distribution of power.

    COURSE OBJECTIVES:
    Learn to think critically about complex issues and identify connections between events
    Write an analytical paper that formulates a causal argument about political or social phenomena

    METHOD OF INSTRUCTION:
    Lecture 3 times a week, plus two sections a week.

    RECOMMENDED PREPARATION:
    Reading a newspaper daily.

    COURSE ASSIGNMENTS & GRADING:
    Reading of 150-200 pages per week, several short papers and a longer research paper.
    Several short papers, one research paper, class participation, final exam.

  • Honors 350 A: Terrorism, Counter-insurgency and Reconstruction
    SLN 14271 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Stephen Sulzbacher (Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences)
    Office: Children's Hospital & Medical Center, Box 359300
    Phone: 206 987-2164
    sis@u.washington.edu
    Tu
    1:30-3:20
    MGH 211B
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 15 students

    There are psychological and sociological mechanisms which dictate the life cycle of insurgent/terrorist movements. The same principles explain the rise and fall of democracies and authoritarian regimes. In this seminar we will look beyond al Qaeda to study the Shining Path of Peru, the ruling clique in Russia and Cuba, the Chiricahua Apache, Cosa Nostra, the child soldiers of Sierra Leone and others. Understanding the
    sociological/psychological forces in these diverse insurgencies can help us predict the true adversaries of the US for the 21st Century.

    Terrorism is a tactic of insurgency. We will identify and study situations where innovative practices have succeeded in countering the growth of terrorist groups.
    The class will then examine/develop innovative practices in public sector engineering, "rule of law," education, agriculture, trade and microfinance which should be incorporated into our reconstruction efforts in 3rd World countries.

    COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
    This class is pass/fail. It will be run like a "think tank." The primary expectation of students is active class participation and a class presentation/paper (individual or group presentation by 2-3 students).

    REQUIRED TEXTS:
    1) Post, JM. The Mind of the Terrorist. New York:Palgrave, Macmillan, 2007.
    2) http://blogs.cgdev.org/open_book/ - a virtual book on microfinance by David Roodman.

  • Honors 350 B: "Channeling" the early 80's: an inter-disciplinary seminar blending media, culture and recent history of psychology
    SLN 14272 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Mark Calogero (Psychology)
    Office: Chemistry Library Building Room 110, Box 351525
    calogero@u.washington.edu
    Th
    1:30-3:20
    MGH 211B
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 15 students

    How would you describe your current portfolio of news sources? And how did those sources become a part of your portfolio? Were they traded, bartered or leveraged from someone you know? Or, did you seek out those sources out on your own, in the process defining yourself by your penchant for taking in news?

    In this work-shop seminar, we will trace the cultural roots of today's specialized news source to back as far as the early 1980's.

    In early 1981, Reagan was shot, and that was news. A few months before, John Lennon died, and the airwaves filled with his musical eulogy. Later that summer, Princess Diana of Wales wed, and the world watched in wonder and thrall.

    Though the real news of the early eighties may have been how we had begun to channel our news differently, and how news sources had begun to evolve into distinct cultures of news-taking in the two decades since Walter Cronkite dropped anchor at CBS. Ted Koppel's "ABC News Nightline" became a water-shed event in the reporting of specialized news stories in 1980, franchising its formula for news creation. And by autumn 1982, blue and white metal vending boxes, containing newspapers with those nifty color-coded weather maps, began to turn up on Berkeley street corners, advertising "today's USA."

    Academically, we will read some of Marshall McLuhan's seminal essays from his book Understanding Media (circa 1965), apply those ideas to contemporary channeling behaviors that we know and engage, and consider how McLuhan's ideas may have anticipated the early 1980's Connectionist movement in cognitive psychology (e.g. in his notion of "hot and cold media"). The Connectionist movement coined the term "parallel processing" and offered new explanations for how we humans construct meanings from the world around us, including those meanings we construct from "media exposure."

    Proposed text: Moggridge's Designing Media (MIT Press).

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