Course Archives

  • ARCH 351 C: Romanesque, Gothic, and Renaissance Architecture (VLPA)
    SLN 10330 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Brian McLaren (Architecture)
    Office: Arch Hall 109, Box 355720
    Phone: 543-4966
    bmclaren@u.washington.edu
    MWF
    F
    9:30-10:20
    10:30-11:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 15 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Arts & Humanities

    Recommended (but not required): ARCH 350.

    ADD CODE REQUIRED. Available in MGH 211 October 31.

    This course presents a survey of architecture from about 750 to about 1789. Examples are drawn from the traditions of Western and Islamic architecture during the periods usually termed the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the Baroque, with particular interest in the formation of and interaction between these traditions.

    Recommended preparation:
    This is an undergraduate upper division and graduate level class, and as such we assume you are responsible students who attend class regularly and plan ahead for assignments and exams. We recommend that you read and review the assigned material before the lectures in which it will be covered. Because the lectures do not directly follow the order of the text, it may be useful first to read an entire chapter or set of chapters in anticipation of the lectures dealing with the material covered. Although Arch 350 is not a prerequisite for the class, the material covered in it is helpful for understanding the course content of Arch 351. Required text: Marvin Trachtenberg and Isabelle Hyman, Architecture, from Prehistory to Postmodernity, Second Edition (New York: H.N. Abrams, 2002).

    Class assignments and grading:
    There will be two tests, two take-home writing assignments, and approximately 215 pages of required readings.

    Test responses will be evaluated for accuracy, thoughtfulness and clarity. Assignments will be evaluated for thoroughness, quality of ideas, and clarity of presentation (this can include writing and graphics). Each test and assignment will be given a percentage score. Final percentage grades will be calculated according to the weighting below and then converted to the University's 4.0 scale using a curve. This means that your final grade will be assessed relative to the performance of the others in this class.

    Assignment 1: 20 % of course grade Assignment 2: 20 % of course grade Test 1: 30 % of course grade Test 2: 30 % of course grade

  • ART 140 A: Honors Photography (VLPA)
    SLN 10407 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Zack Bent (Art)
    MW
    2:30-5:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 20 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Arts & Humanities

    Digital camera with a minimum 3 Megapixel capacity and 512 MB memory card is required.

    COURSE FULL. Visit MGH 211 to be added to the waitlist.

    Introduction to theory, techniques, and processes of still photography. Projects stress the visual and creative potential of the medium.

    ART 140 is an introduction to the theory, techniques and processes of still photography with a DIGITAL CAMERA, which IS required. Course content will emphasize photography's potential for self-expression and creative problem solving in an artistic context. Image output will include digital prints and on-line presentation.

    Course content will be delivered through slide lectures, demonstrations, field trips, workshops, discussion, work reviews and consultations. Lab work will be largely comprised of digital image processing and basic on-line presentation.

    Please IGNORE the camera requirement description in the Official course description (http://www.washington.edu/students/crscat/art.html#art140). Instead, a digital camera with a minimum 3 Megapixel capacity and 512 MB memory card is required. Digital cameras are also available for check-out from CSS in Kane Hall. You will spend approximately $50 on printing your images; commercial printing facilities will be utilized.

    CLASS ASSIGNMENTS & GRADING
    Each student will complete photographic projects (both on-line and in print form), submit a written review and participate in group reviews. Each assignment is designed to stimulate consideration of a specific conceptual approach but may be realized with a range of creative solutions.

    Assessment is ongoing throughout the quarter. Regular group reviews of your photographic assignments are a valuable and essential component of this class. Evaluation will be based upon the conceptual development / adventurousness of your ideas and technical progress.

    In addition to the merit of your photographic work, assessment will also be based upon your level of contribution to discussion, your written review and your on-line contributions as reflections of engagement and critical thinking.

    Also, refer to the School of Art guidelines for assessment criteria, which will be handed out in class.

  • Honors 211 A: Green Screens: Global Ecology, American Bodies, and the New Documentary (VLPA)
    SLN 14349 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Jennifer Bean (Comparative Literature)
    Office: C-522 Padelford, Box 354338
    Phone: 206 616-6781
    jmbean@u.washington.edu
    MW
    11:30-1:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Arts & Humanities

    Please note: film screenings will be scheduled Tuesdays or Thursdays, 11:30-1:20 as needed.

    The effect of modern culture on the environment and on our bodies is everywhere evident. One opens the newspaper each day to find four or five articles whose burden is that pesticides contaminate the food of farm animals in Michigan; that children under the age of 10 now suffer from diabetes; that heart disease linked to obesity is topping medical charts; that the Cascade Mountains have lost 56 glaciers in the past four decades and the Parthenon is decaying faster in ten years than in the previous thousand because of automobile exhausts. We have reached an age when human advances in science and industrialism are damaging the planet's basic life support systems, generating waste that the environment can no longer tolerate. To add injury to insult, the human mind that made such advances possible in the first place turns out to have a mouth through which it is fed. And it is eating garbage.

    The paradoxes of the present age have become the subject of a "new documentary" film and media movement, ranging from CNN sponsored television programs on global warming, through "Modern Marvels" cable spots on the food industry and renewable energy, to independent filmmakers who take their own bodies as "visible evidence" of environmental and physical crisis. Due to the rhetorical potency of documentary filmmaking as a tool for public education and advocacy, the form has frequently served as a powerful instrument of rationality, harnessed to the manufacture of social consent. But alternative rhetorical and ethical ends also have shaped the new documentary movement, in some cases by placing greater value on the openness and mutual receptivity between filmmaker and subject that may extend to the relationship between the audience and the film. Other films forcibly demonstrate the unraveling of certainty in the visible field and play with cinematic technique-editing tempos, camera angles, lighting, framing devices, time-lapse photography, extreme close or long shots, mobile or still cameras, etc.-in order to question environmental effects that defy conventional models of perception and knowledge.

    CLASS STRUCTURE:
    Formal Sessions and Film Screenings: Given what literary critic William Rueckert termed the First Law of Ecology-"Everything is connected to everything else"-this is a particularly ambitious course. You will learn to employ a set of analytical and critical skills intrinsic to film and media studies that will provide a foundation for our study. But we will also be grappling with an ensemble of interlocking ideas, texts, people, and institutions-a sprawling formation within which environmental discourse historically has attained intellectual, popular and legal status. Approximately 15 films will form our primary focus and another 30 films and television episodes will be considered in short clips and excerpts; readings will include work by sociologists, historians, philosophers, biologists, and natural and health scientists. Regular class sessions meet twice a week (T/Th). An additional two sessions (M/W) are designated for film screenings. You are highly encouraged to attend all regular screenings in our designated classroom, but in cases of scheduling conflict you may also watch these films on your own in the Odegarrd Media Center where all required titles will be on reserve.

    Regular Assignments and 'Honor's Portfolio' Final Project: In the first half of the quarter assignments include weekly exercises such as brief written responses, film segmentation analyses, and oral presentations on relevant materials. A mid-term exam will be administered in week five. Through these foundational assignments you will develop research skills and the critical tools necessary to mount a final "documentary" project of your own making that will take the Puget Sound area-including, for instance, local farmers, municipal legislators in Seattle, the UW-medical school, local non-profit environmental organizations and other relevant people and sites-as a "case study" for a series of short documentary-style interviews/films that you will design, shoot, and produce in small groups. These final film projects will be contingent on the interviews and footage you are able to secure, and each project will thus differ in coverage and tone. All projects will be edited for coherence and uploaded as a component of your Honor's Portfolio. In order to accomplish this goal an adventurous and inquisitive spirit, as well as a mind open to opinions and perspectives that might differ from your own is absolutely necessary. No prior filmmaking experience required.

  • Honors 211 B: Jews, Greeks & Romans in the Ancient World (VLPA)
    SLN 14350 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Sarah Stroup (Classics)
    Office: Denny 226, Box 353110
    Phone: 206 543-2276
    scstroup@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    1:30-3:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Arts & Humanities

    In the third century BCE, the Torah was translated from Hebrew into Greek by order of the Greek king Ptolemy II. About a hundred years later, a Jewish rebel army led by Judas Maccabee gained an unlikely victory of that of the Greek ruler Antiochus IV Epiphanes, who had prohibited the practice of religious freedom. At around the same time, we have record of the first Jewish inhabitants of Rome, and fifty years later, there is evidence of a thriving Jewish community in the city, living and working in relative peace with their gentile neighbors. In the early first century CE, the Jewish philosopher Philo of Alexandria reports that life for Roman Jews is a secure one, respecting even the observance of the Jewish Sabbath. Later that century, the Emperor Vespasian would direct the second destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem, sending countless Jews into the diaspora and building the Colosseum as a monument to his victory. Tacitus is puzzled by the Jews (though he seem to respect them); Juvenal makes fun of Jewish practice (with which he is surprisingly familiar). Jewish catacombs are scattered among the outskirts of Rome, and ancient synagogues dot the ancient landscape.

    This course examines the wide-ranging social, political, intellectual, economic, religious, and material interactions between Jews, Greeks, and Romans in the ancient Mediterranean world, from the early Hellenistic Period (4th c BCE) through to the first centuries of the Roman Empire.

  • Honors 241 A: Artists, Citizens, and Censors: The Trouble With Art in Fascist and Communist Societies (VLPA)
    SLN 14357 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Ileana Marin (Comparative Literature)

    Phone: 206 632-9865
    marini@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    1:30-3:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Arts & Humanities

    The course "Artists, Citizens, and Censors: The Trouble with Art in Fascist and Communist Societies" combines the study of primary documents which have defined and regulated censorship with the analysis of famous works whose public impact was delayed due to what was deemed to be their seditious content. By way of introduction we will watch Martin Ritt's The Front (1976), which ridicules McCarthy's attempts to censor the Hollywood industry. The film will facilitate a discussion of censorship, citizenship, and artistry. We will then review various legislations on censorship, including the Catholic Church's list of forbidden works (Index Librorum Prohibitorum), published regularly from 1564 to 1966; the British Obscene Publications Act of 1857; and concluding with fascist and communist forms of censorship. We will acquaint ourselves with the most oppressive authoritarian regimes of the twentieth century (fascism and communism) as we cross disciplinary boundaries, engaging history, law, politics, religion, ethics, literature, and aesthetics.

    We will read texts ranging across every major literary genre, starting with the novels All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque (1929) and the abridged version of The Gulag Archipelago by Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn (1973). We will also investigate the reasons which impelled communist authorities around the globe to ban Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot (1954) and Vaclav Havel's The Garden Party (1963). Although apparently inoffensive, the theatre of the absurd, to which both plays belong, was considered dangerous for dictatorial political regimes that were based on a limitation of individual rights. Beckett and Havel mocked stereotypical attitudes in order to suggest that language itself may become a paradoxical means of communicating the impossibility of communication. We will examine poems by Huang Xiang (China) which became subject to censorship. Close readings of poems by Xiang will give us access to the type of writing that is born when authors are acutely aware of being exposed to censorship and develop strategies to reach readers while deceiving vigilant censors. The analysis of historical, political, and cultural contexts of these censored texts will provide a closer look at the conditions which led policy makers to repress literature and enable us to understand how these texts threatened the political establishment.

    The goal of this course is to provide a substantial experience of the cultural oppression and moral perversity practiced by fascism and communism, as well as of the way in which artists innovate alternative models of expression in the context of censorship. In addition to close readings of major texts, we will examine censored paintings and films in order to identify the aesthetic strategies that fostered powerful meanings and triggered violent official reactions from fascist and communist authorities. A selective, yet relevant group of paintings signed by Rene Magritte, Max Ernst, Edward Munch, and Salvador Dali (among others) and films directed by Jean Renoir, Roman Polanki, and Jerzy Domaradzki will be discussed in class, in order to uncover the underlying artistic conventions, hidden meanings, and social expectations at the time of their debut. More importantly, we will try to unpack the paradox of why dictators fear artists so much and will investigate how works can both reflect their authors' responses to their own times and circumstances, and at the same time appeal to a public living in very different contexts.

    ORAL PRESENTATIONS
    Each student will present one critical reading from the course packet and will provide a handout with the main points of the article, including clarifications of the author's more difficult points, questions for the rest of the class, and potentially quotable passages. You will meet with me 2 days before the presentation to discuss the text and the format of the presentation. The rest of the students are expected to read the texts critically and participate in the discussions.

    CASE STUDIES
    For this class, you will develop a detailed research project on censorship. By the end of week 5 you will have an idea of how different forms of censorship work and will start looking into potential topics you might like to investigate. A list of potential topics will be circulated and discussed in class and in conferences. A preliminary bibliography will be provided for each project after we meet one-on-one. You are expected to expand the initial bibliography, both by incorporating texts from the course reading list and by adding new titles. The end of Week 8 will turn in the bibliography as annotated bibliography. Students will present their case studies during the last two weeks of the quarter, according to a schedule circulated in class. Before their presentation they will distribute handouts to their peers, in order to facilitate conversation, comments, and suggestions.

    FINAL PAPER REQUIREMENTS
    Writing a paper on literary censorship is by definition a challenge, both in terms of choosing the topic and in terms of structuring the approach. You may develop your case studies into academic papers. The papers will make use of the critical readings in the course packet. Final papers, about 12 pages, will follow the MLA style for in-text citations and will have a Works Cited list at the end.

  • FISH 101 AH: Water & Society (I&S / NW)
    SLN 13825 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Daniel Schindler (Aquatic & Fishery Sciences)

    Phone: 206 616-6724
    deschind@u.washington.edu
    Th
    1:30-3:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Special Topics
    H-Interdisciplinary

    Students must register for FISH 101 A lecture. See Time Schedule for more information.

    No add code necessary.

    Instructors: Julian Olden and Daniel Schindler (course evaluations for these instructors are consistently greater than 4 pts on a 5 pt scale) No prerequisites! Great for Freshmen through seniors, all majors!

    FRESHWATER is:
    - Essential for life.
    - The oil of the 21st century.
    - Breeding ground of the most dangerous human diseases.
    - Losing species faster than any other ecosystem.
    - A reason to launch a war?

    Come learn about how, despite the abundance of water on Earth, freshwater is coming under increasing pressure as human populations increase and climate warms. These changes affect not only those ecosystems, but also human health and how we interact with each other both politically and socially. Come learn about how social changes might reduce human impacts on fresh water systems, locally, nationally and internationally. You'll also learn how to calculate your own personal water footprint and explore ways to reduce consumption of this valuable resource!

  • Honors 391 A: "I am Charlotte Simmons": An Interactive Health Seminar Based on the Novel by Tom Wolfe (VLPA / I&S / NW)
    SLN 14359 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Clarence Spigner (Health Services)
    Office: H-692 Health Sciences Building, Box 357660
    Phone: 206 616-2948
    cspigner@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    1:30-3:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Interdisciplinary

    Students who take this course should be open to discussing controversial issues of college life.

    This seminar will engage in intense discussion about student life and encompass key aspects of health and wellbeing. The framework is the controversial novel, I am Charlotte Simmons, by Tom Wolfe, that chronicles the world view of an 18 year-old undergraduate female, Charlotte Simmons, and her first year at a northeastern college. The highly readable work addresses college campus issues including self esteem, sexual risk-taking, cultures of drinking, date-rape, pathological narcissism, depression, disclosure, student-athletes, elitism, sororicide and fraternities, social support, and family-ties. These social dynamics are reflected in brutal, outrageous and stylistic formats in Charlotte's Alice in Wonderland initiation into year-one of undergraduate life. A chronology of events builds in the 34 chapter novel to inform a deeper understanding of the human condition. In this course/seminar, health education theories serve are frameworks; such as Social Learning or Cognitive Theory, the Theory of Reasoned Action, the Stages of Change or Trans-theoretical Model, and the Health Belief Model.

    The Socratic approach is employed to give students a voice. Students must bring the maturity and intellect to critically examine both the summit and the pitfalls of campus life.

  • Honors 394 A: Comparative Ideologies: Human Rights Movements (VLPA / I&S)
    SLN 14360 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Clare Bright (Gender Studies (GWSS))
    Office: B-110 Padelford, Box 354345
    Phone: (206) 543-6900
    cbright@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    12:30-2:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Interdisciplinary

    An exploration of the philosophies which have shaped the Black Liberation Movement, the Feminist Movement and the Gay Rights Movement in the United States. We will begin by looking at the ideological roots of these movements in earlier centuries then trace their development through their 20th century manifestations. Similarities and differences in these social theories will be analyzed along with the historical contexts in which they were and are invoked. We will also consider the political ramifications of utilizing particular paradigms to argue for social change.

    COURSE OBJECTIVES:
    To provide an overview of the sociopolitical philosophies which underlie the Feminist, African/American, and Gay movements in the United States.
    To situate these paradigms in their historical context.
    To assess which theories, concepts and arguments transcend the particular features of the individual movements and apply across their differences and which do not.
    To develop the students' ability to analyze, formulate and defend theory.
    To assist students in examining their own sociopolitical beliefs and goals.

    REQUIRED TEXTS:
    Black Power Ideologies, John McCartney
    Readings Packets (available at Prof. Copy, 42nd & U. Way)

    COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
    - Class participation (30%): Be present and prepared for discussion. This means having each day's readings completed by class time and coming with some ideas about them and about any assigned questions. Participation includes both thoughtful comments and active, respectful listening and an appropriate balance between them. One absence is permitted without affecting your participation grade.
    - Weekly response papers (30%): Each week questions or topics related to the readings will be given on which you will write approximately 2 typewritten pages. Graded credit/no-credit.
    - Group project (15%): Guidelines to be announced.
    - Final exam (take-home essay) (25%)

  • Honors 394 B: What is an American? Immigrant experiences in the United States (VLPA / I&S)
    SLN 14361 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Juliet Shields (English)
    Office: A101 Padelford Hall, Box 354330
    Phone: 206 543-6201
    js37@u.washington.edu
    MW
    12:30-2:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Interdisciplinary

    Since its beginnings, the United States has defined itself as a nation of immigrants. Yet we also struggle to decide who "counts" as an American in cultural and legal terms. In this course, we will study immigration from several angles: literary-historical, political, and sociological. First we will examine the literature and history of several major immigrant groups of the twentieth century, including Jewish, Chinese, and Hispanic peoples, among others. By reading the stories and histories of these groups, we will uncover similarities and differences in the experiences of immigrants from diverse parts of the world. We will ask what motivated them to come to the United States, whether they found what they hoped for there, how they adapted to life in a new country, whether and how they maintained ties to their homelands, and whether they consider themselves American. Second, we will examine contemporary political debates surrounding illegal or unregulated immigration, including those concerning education, employment, and marriage. After we explore multiple perspectives on these issues, students will be encouraged to form their own opinions. Finally, students will perform their own ethnographic study of the immigrant experience in Washington by interviewing a recent immigrant and analyzing the results of their interview in the context of our course readings. In addition to active class participation, course requirements will include three 3-page papers and a presentation.

    This course includes a service learning option, which may count towards one of your required Experiential Learning projects. Contact the instructor for information regarding specific details of service learning options in this course and visit the Honors Experiential Learning site: http://depts.washington.edu/uwhonors/reqs/exp/

  • Honors 394 C: Teaching What You Know (VLPA / I&S)
    SLN 14362 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Frances McCue (Writer in Residence, UW Honors)
    frances@francesmccue.com
    TTh
    10:30-12:30
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Interdisciplinary

    What makes a good teacher? What conditions need to exist for learning to take place? In this course, we'll look to literature and films for the answer. By studying portrayals of teachers as both heroes and demons, we'll build our own theories of pedagogy and test out our notions of becoming good teachers. In films ranging from "Waiting for Superman," "The Class," and "Dead Poets Society," we'll see how victory narratives and failure narratives arise, and we'll also look to novels, poems and short stories for fictional portrayals also construct assumptions about teaching and learning. In the end, our hope will be that you have a good teaching practice that you can test out in a range of settings.

    This course is the second segment in the Ways Of Knowing sequence. Students are not required to have taken "Ways of Knowing" before coming to this class. In the spring, "Teaching What You Know in Community Settings," an internship experience, will be offered.

    Three papers, a teaching journal and in class presentations will be required.

  • BIOC 441 AD: Honors Biochemistry (NW)
    SLN 11048 (View Time Schedule info »)

    William Parson (Biochemistry)
    Office: J-061C Health Sciences, Box 357350
    Phone: 206 543-1743
    parsonb@u.washington.edu
    W
    2:30-3:20
    Credits: 4
    Limit: 30 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Add codes available from Biochem dept. Contact advisers@chem.washington.edu for information.
    BIOC 441 Honors section. Students must also register for Bioc 441 A lecture (SLN 11044). See Time Schedule for day/time information.

    Biochemistry and molecular biology (with quiz sections) for undergraduate students in molecular and cellular biology, for biochemistry majors, and graduate students in other science departments.

  • CHEM 155 A: Honors General Chemistry (NW)
    SLN 11718 (View Time Schedule info »)

    David Ginger (Chemistry)

    Phone: 206 685-2331
    ginger@chem.washington.edu
    MWF
    2:30-3:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 72 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Add codes available through Chemistry dept.
    Prerequisite: 2.2 in Honors CHEM 145.
    Students must also sign up for Section AA, AB, or AC. See Time Schedule for day/time information.

    Continuation of CHEM 145. Includes laboratory. Together CHEM 145 and 155 cover material in CHEM 142, 152, and 162. No more than the number of credits indicated can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: CHEM 152, 155 (5 credits); 145, 155, 162 (10 credits).

  • CHEM 336 A: Honors Organic Chemistry (NW)
    SLN 11839 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Michael Gelb (Chemistry)

    Phone: 206 543-7142
    gelb@chem.washington.edu
    MWThF
    10:30-11:20
    Credits: 4
    Limit: 72 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Add codes available through Chemistry dept.
    Prerequisite: 2.2 in Honors CHEM 335.

    For chemistry majors and otherwise qualified students planning three or more quarters of organic chemistry. Structure, nomenclature, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Theory and mechanism of organic reactions. Studies of biomolecules. No more than 4 credits can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: CHEM 238, CHEM 336.

  • CSE 142 A or B: Computer Programming I (NW)
    SLN ?

    Stuart Reges (Computer Science & Engineering)
    Office: Allen Center, Room 552, Box 352350
    Phone: 206 685-9138
    reges@cs.washington.edu
    Credits: 5
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Students must register for 1 credit of CSE 390 in addition to CSE 142 to earn Honors credit. Instructor will give details on registration for CSE 390 during week 1.
    Students must also register for a section (AA-AO; BA-BN); see Time Schedule for more info

    Basic programming-in-the-small abilities and concepts including procedural programming (methods, parameters, return values) , basic control structures (sequence, if/else, for loop, while loop), file processing, arrays and an introduction to defining objects.

  • CSE 143 A: Computer Programming II (NW)
    SLN 12290 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Martin Stepp (Computer Science)
    Office: CSE636
    Phone: (206) 685-2181
    stepp@cs.washington.edu
    MWF
    12:30-1:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 265 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Students must register for 1 credit of CSE 390 in addition to CSE 143 to earn Honors credit. Instructor will give details on registration for CSE 390 during week 1.
    Students must also register for a section (AA-AN); see Time Schedule for more info

    Continuation of CSE 142. Concepts of data abstraction and encapsulation including stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, recursion, instruction to complexity and use of predefined collection classes. Prerequisite: CSE 142.

  • Honors 221 A: The Big Deal about Little Things: Ecology and Evolution of Microbes (NW)
    SLN 14351 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Claire Horner-Devine (Aquatic and Fishery Sciences)

    mchd@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    9:30-11:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 10 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Cross-listed with FISH 221A.

    Preference for enrollment goes to Freshman and Sophomores. Contact instructor (mchd@uw.edu) if you are interested and this description does not fit you.

    * What do you think of when someone says microbe?

    * Did you know there are more bacterial cells in your body than human cells?

    * Did you know that microbes outnumber all other species and make up most living matter?

    * Did you now that microbes are the oldest living organisms on earth and live in places once thought incompatible with life?

    The goal of this course is to learn how biological scientists look at the world. We will do this by focusing on one very exciting new area in biology: the study of microbes in nature.

    When most people think of microbes they think of one thing - disease. But most microbes do not cause disease; in fact, they are essential for our survival. Microbes exist everywhere, in soil, in water, in air, at the bottom of the oceans, and deep in the earth's crust. And they thrive in environments that we usually think of as deadly, environments such as boiling water, ice, on radioactive substances and in environments without oxygen. In this course, we will learn about some of these amazing creatures and how biologists discover and study them.


    Comments from a previous student:
    I have a confession to make: I was a little doubtful about this class when I signed up. Microbial ecology? I didn't even know what that meant. However,ever since it began I haven't been able to shut up about microbes (really, it's been annoying my roomates) I keep learning little mind-blowing facts that completely alter my perception of our world. Starting with the tree of life-it's crazy to think that we all started from microscopic prokaryotes, that through the process of endosymbiosis evolved into eukaryotes, which in turn (over the course of millions of years) evolved into multi-cellular human beings!...My mind has been blown!

  • Honors 221 B: DNA & Evolution (NW)
    SLN 14352 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Jon Herron (Biology)
    Office: 205D Burke Museum, Box 351800
    Phone: (206) 547-6330
    herronjc@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    10:30-12:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 23 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Evolution and genetics are the cornerstones of modern biology. DNA & Evolution will explore these fields in the context of contemporary issues that are important to individuals and societies. Although examples will be drawn from a variety of organisms, the primary emphasis will be on humans. Among the questions we will consider are these: Where did modern humans come from? Why are women and men different? Why do children resemble their parents? Do genes influence variation in personality, intelligence, and sexual orientation? What can genetic analyses reveal about evolutionary history and the relationships among species? Can genetic analyses allow us to predict the evolutionary future? Given what our society knows about evolution and genetics, should we take responsibility for guiding the evolutionary future of human populations?

    Throughout the course the goal will be to help students develop sufficient biological sophistication to understand new discoveries in genetics and evolution, talk to their doctors, and make rational personal and political choices about biological issues. Students will read secondary and primary literature, ask questions, design experiments, analyze and interpret data, and draw their own conclusions.

    Assignments will include essays, problem sets, and computer labs.

  • Honors 221 C: DNA & Evolution (NW)
    SLN 14353 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Jon Herron (Biology)
    Office: 205D Burke Museum, Box 351800
    Phone: (206) 547-6330
    herronjc@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    12:30-2:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 23 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Evolution and genetics are the cornerstones of modern biology. DNA & Evolution will explore these fields in the context of contemporary issues that are important to individuals and societies. Although examples will be drawn from a variety of organisms, the primary emphasis will be on humans. Among the questions we will consider are these: Where did modern humans come from? Why are women and men different? Why do children resemble their parents? Do genes influence variation in personality, intelligence, and sexual orientation? What can genetic analyses reveal about evolutionary history and the relationships among species? Can genetic analyses allow us to predict the evolutionary future? Given what our society knows about evolution and genetics, should we take responsibility for guiding the evolutionary future of human populations?

    Throughout the course the goal will be to help students develop sufficient biological sophistication to understand new discoveries in genetics and evolution, talk to their doctors, and make rational personal and political choices about biological issues. Students will read secondary and primary literature, ask questions, design experiments, analyze and interpret data, and draw their own conclusions.

    Assignments will include essays, problem sets, and computer labs.

  • Honors 221 D: The be-wilding of science or scientific bewilderment: conservation philosophy for the 22nd century (NW)
    SLN 14354 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Jeremy Littell (JISAO CSES Climate Impacts Group)
    Office: 3737 Brooklyn Ave NE, Box 355672
    Phone: 206 221-2997
    jlittell@u.washington.edu
    MW
    1:30-3:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    What's wild? Should - and can- WE keep it wild? Surely science can tell us how to think like a mountain, right? Conservation and preservation are about the human relationship with landscapes - how we choose to use resources, how we manage them, and how we decide when not to use them. Science is about what we know and how we know it, even how we know we know it. But what does science really tell us about how to conserve, how to preserve? And when it comes to wilderness and wildness, of what use is science?

    This course will explore the intersection of science, nature, and wilderness and how they shed light on the tension between preservation and conservation. We'll read about and discuss the concepts of wilderness, conservation, and preservation and become familiar with the history of public land and resource management in the western U.S. We'll also discuss the philosophies that grew out of the unique experiment that took place in managing the American West. Along the way, we'll spend time learning about paleoecology, landscape ecology, conservation biology, and ecosystem services - the interdisciplinary branches of ecological science that can inform management of public resources and lands. Of equal importance, we'll spend time discussing the philosophical basis for preservation and conservation and how decisions about the fate of public lands actually get made - you may be surprised at the role science often plays. Finally, we'll ask ourselves what do conservation and preservation look like in a rapidly warming world and what that means for sustainability of natural resources.

    COURSE OBJECTIVES:
    This course is intended to familiarize students with the (1) historical basis for public lands management, including the concepts of conservation, preservation, and wilderness; (2) the interdisciplinary science used to inform resource management; and (3) the consequences of the interaction of our diverse philosophical approaches to nature with scientifically based management. The course emphasizes communication (written and other media) and discussion.

    At the end of this course, you should be able to:
    - Describe the history of the ideas of conservation, preservation, and wilderness
    - Critically evaluate conservation biology as a basis for public lands management
    - Communicate effectively through one or more medium(s) your creative thoughts on conservation, preservation, and wilderness
    - Understand multiple paths to knowledge about nature and the human place in it

    COURSE FORMAT:
    ~1/4 lecture, ~1/4 discussion, ~1/2 out of class reading and work

    EVALUATION:
    Participation - discussion: ~30%
    Field notebook / writing: ~30%
    Discussion leadership: ~10%
    Project (individual or group): ~30%

    READINGS:
    - Childs, C. 2001. The Secret Knowledge of Water: Discovering the essence of the American desert. Back Bay Books, 304p.
    - Feynman, R.P. 1998 edition. The meaning of it all: thoughts of a citizen scientist. Perseus Books, 133p.
    - Leopold, A. 1949. A Sand County Almanac. Any edition.

    Selections from:
    - Cronon, W., ed. 1995. Uncommon Ground: Rethinking the Human Place in Nature. New York: W. W. Norton & Co. 561p.
    - Matthiessen, P. 1978. The snow leopard.
    - Miles, J.C. 2008. Playground or Preserve: The Story of Wilderness in National Parks. University of Washington Press, 344p.
    - Nash, R.F. 2001. Wilderness and the American Mind. Fourth Edition Yale University Press, 432p.
    - Quammen, D. 1997. The Song of the Dodo: Island Biogeography in an Age of Extinction. Scribner. 704p.

  • Honors 221 E: Climatic Extremes (NW)
    SLN 14355 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Paul Johnson (Oceanography)
    Office: 256 Marine Science Bldg, Box 357940
    Phone: 206 543-8474
    johnson@ocean.washington.edu
    Paul Quay (Oceanography)
    Office: 417 Ocean Science Bldg, Box 355351
    Phone: 206 685-8061
    pdquay@u.washington.edu
    TWThF
    11:30-1:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 10 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Cross-listed with OCEAN 450A.

    This course examines the earth's past for evidence of extreme climate conditions in order to better understand possible future climate changes. Conditions that occurred during the Neo-Proterozoic (Snowball Earth: 750 to 550 million years ago), the Cretaceous Hothouse (100 million years ago, and Pleistocene Icehouse (1 million years ago) will be compared to the Present Greenhouse climate.

    Dramatic changes in the earth's climate has resulted from natural variations in solar insolation, atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, rates of ocean circulation, plate tectonics and volcanic activity, the evolution of vascular plants and, in recent times, the burning of fossil fuels. The impact of these factors on climate, through onteractions between the atmosphere, oceans and land, will be discussed. Importantly, the processes that produced past climate changes will be discussed in the context of modern impending climate change.

    One class period per week will be spent in class discussion of an important paper. Problem sets, stressing quantitative solutions, will be given as take home assignments during the quarter.

  • Honors 221 F: The Nature of Science (NW)
    SLN 20267 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Bruce Hevly (History)
    Office: 302 Smith Hall, Box 353560
    Phone: 206 543-9417
    bhevly@u.washington.edu
    Ron Irving (Mathematics)
    Office: Padelford C-548, Box 354350
    Phone: 206 543-1165
    rsi@uw.edu
    Michael Brown (Earth & Space Sciences)
    Office: 220 ATG, Box 351310
    Phone: 206 616-6058
    brown@ess.washington.edu
    TThF
    11:30-12:50
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 15 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Cross-listed with INTSCI 402.

    This course serves as an introduction to questions concerning the general nature of science and the character of scientific methods. We will distinguish between several different elements of scientific practice - observation, data, statistical analysis, interpretation, hypothesis, theory, law - and afterwards we will think about the relations between them. What is the role of observation in science? What allows data to serve as compelling evidence for a particular theory? Are theories verified, falsified, or both? What role does statistical analysis play in this process? How do scientific theories and scientific knowledge change through time? How are ideas that become meaningful in particular context transmitted to others, and how do they change in that process?

    Here we take up two important episodes in the history of 20th century earth science as case studies to help answer these questions: debates over, and the ultimate rejection of, Wegner's theory of continental drift in the first three decades of the twentieth century; and the establishment of plate tectonics in the 1960s and the 1970s. These cases will allow us to discuss the aspirations of geology to move from the realm of natural history to that of natural philosophy -- that is, to mature as a science, in the eyes of many practitioners, as well as the functions of a working community of scientists and the interactions among instruments, evidence, and explanations. Through lectures and discussions, the course will explore many of the main ideas often used to explain science to nonscientists such as students, museum visitors, and popular audiences for books and documentaries.

    Learning objectives:
    - Reflect on the nature of scientific methods and consider whether, and to what extent, there is a unified method for all sciences.
    - Develop a conception of evidence and the relations between observation, data, hypothesis, and theory.
    - Identify the differences between raw data, statistical analysis, theory, and interpretation.
    - Develop the critical reasoning skills necessary for assessing the issues raised above.
    - Cultivate skills for articulating clearly and precisely, both orally and in writing, scientific concepts and general perspectives.
    - Learn how to read, comprehend, and analyze both primary source materials written by scientists and other participants, and secondary interpretations produced by scientists, by historians of science and by philosophers.

  • Honors 396 A: Discussion Supplement to Biology 200: Thinking like a Scientist (NW)
    SLN 14363 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Kristy Brady (Biology)
    Office: Development, Outreach, & Communications, Box 351800
    Phone: 685-2185
    kbrady@u.washington.edu
    F
    9:30-11:20
    Credits: 2
    Limit: 20 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Must be concurrently enrolled in BIOL 200.

    ADD CODE REQUIRED. Email laurah13@uw.edu

  • Honors 396 B: Discussion Supplement to Biology 200: Current Topics in Molecular and Cellular Biology (NW)
    SLN 14364 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Jocelyn Wright (Pathology)

    Phone: 206 616-4796
    jhw5@u.washington.edu
    Th
    2:30-4:20
    Credits: 2
    Limit: 25 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Must be concurrently enrolled in BIOL 200.

    ADD CODE REQUIRED. Email laurah13@uw.edu.

    This class is a unique class designed as an Honors discussion section to supplement your main biology class this quarter - Biology 200. Note: it is not designed as a review session for the work covered in Biology 200!

    OBJECTIVES: Where does the information in your textbooks come from? In this class, we will examine the process of discovery science. That is, we will learn how scientists determine, evaluate, and communicate the information that makes it (eventually) into your textbooks. You will gain instruction and practice in analyzing data and reading and evaluating primary literature - the vehicle by which scientists report their findings to one another and the public.

    This is a seminar style discussion section designed to capitalize on the benefits of small class size. In any scientific discipline, it is important not only to understand and assess, but to be able to thoroughly educate yourself on a topic, articulate your point, and back your opinion up with facts, a portion of the course will be dedicated to giving you the opportunity to practice these skills in the form of writings and presentations. In addition, there will be a variety of guest speakers.

  • Honors 396 C: Discussion Supplement to Biology 220: Thinking like a Scientist (NW)
    SLN 14365 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Benjamin Smarr (Biology)
    smarrb@u.washington.edu
    F
    12:30-2:20
    Credits: 2
    Limit: 25 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Must be concurrently enrolled in BIOL 220.

  • MATH 125 H: Honors Calculus with Analytical Geometry II (NW)
    SLN 15607 (View Time Schedule info »)

    MWF
    10:30-11:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 60 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Add codes are available from Math Department.
    Students must have completed Honors Math 124.
    Students must register for section HA or HB. Check Time Schedule for day/time information.

    Second quarter in the calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes integral calculus. Emphasizes applications and problem solving using the tools of calculus.

  • MATH 135 A: Accelerated (Honors) Calculus (NW)
    SLN 15638 (View Time Schedule info »)

    MTWThF
    10:30-11:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 35 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Add code available from Math Department only, C-36 Padelford.
    Students must have completed Honors MATH 134.

    Covers the material of MATH 124, 125, 126; 307, 308, 318. First year of a two-year accelerated sequence. May receive advanced placement (AP) credit for 125 after taking 135. For students with above average preparation, interest, and ability in mathematics.

  • MATH 335 A: Accelerated (Honors) Advanced Calculus (NW)
    SLN 15678 (View Time Schedule info »)

    MTWThF
    10:30-11:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Add code available from Math Department only, C-36 Padelford.
    Students must have completed Honors MATH 334.

    Introduction to proofs and rigor; uniform convergence, Fourier series and partial differential equations, vector calculus, complex variables. Students who complete this sequence are not required to take MATH 309, 324, 326, 327, 328, and 427. Second year of an accelerated two-year sequence; prepares students for senior-level mathematics courses. Prerequisite: 2.0 in MATH 334.

  • PHYS 122 B: Honors Electromagnetism and Oscillatory Motion (NW)
    SLN 17509 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Paula Heron (Physics)
    Office: C208B Physics-Astronomy Bldg., Box 351560
    Phone: 206 543-3894
    pheron@phys.washington.edu
    MWF
    9:30-10:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 66 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Natural Sci
    H-Natural Science

    Contact Prof. Heron at pheron@uw.edu for add code.
    Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 122 quiz section and lab required. See Time Schedule for section & lab info.

    Basic principles of electromagnetism, the mechanics of oscillatory motion, and experiments in these topics for physical science and engineering majors. Lecture tutorial and lab components must all be taken to receive credit. Credit is not given for both PHYS 115 and PHYS 122.

  • GEOG 331 AC: Global Poverty & Care (I&S)
    SLN 14090 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Victoria Lawson (Geography)
    Phone: 543-5196
    lawson@u.washington.edu
    F
    11:30-12:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 17 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Social Science

    Students must also register for GEOG 331A lecture (SLN 14087). See Time Schedule for day/time information.

    ADD CODE REQUIRED. Visit MGH 211.

    Explores the causes and patterns of global poverty, and the urgent need for studies of care in both academic work and public policy. Considers the possibilities and challenges of caring across distance, and ways to respectfully engage with people in different places.

    Please note this class links up with GH 101 'Introduction to Global Health: Disparities, Determinants, Policies and Outcomes'. Students are encouraged, but not required, to enroll in both.

  • GEOG 331 AD: Global Poverty & Care (I&S)
    SLN 20097 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Victoria Lawson (Geography)
    Phone: 543-5196
    lawson@u.washington.edu
    F
    11:30-12:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 13 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Social Science

    Students must also register for GEOG 331A lecture (SLN 14087). See Time Schedule for day/time information.

    ADD CODE REQUIRED. Email rroth@uw.edu.

    Explores the causes and patterns of global poverty, and the urgent need for studies of care in both academic work and public policy. Considers the possibilities and challenges of caring across distance, and ways to respectfully engage with people in different places.

    Please note this class links up with GH 101 'Introduction to Global Health: Disparities, Determinants, Policies and Outcomes'. Students are encouraged, but not required, to enroll in both.

  • Honors 231 A: Mapping Global Capitalism at Local Levels: A Honors Survival Guide? (I&S)
    SLN 14356 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Clarke Speed (Anthropology)

    landogo@u.washington.edu
    MW
    11:30-1:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 40 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Social Science

    This course looks into global capitalism as the primary form of human cultural adaptation. We use an inverted anthropological focus to seek answers to a range of complex - but practical - questions. Such an anthropological inversion juxtaposes multiple answers. Over time we find that people make distinct cultural ecologies for producing, exchanging, and restricting value. Here we read capital as both a universal trickling down and a local cultural production flowing upwards. Both flows are value appropriating. The small and particular flows into the global, and vice versa. Both find spaces of mediation, crises, and collapse. This is not a "bash capitalism as evil" approach. Rather, we aim to equip ourselves with tools for success in a unpredictable world; a world where the enigmas of capitalism are many and generate contradictions. Honors students in the sciences, humanities, and social sciences will be given pragmatic tools to see and act on how people make particular cultural contradictions the defining feature of human difference and why these differences matter now more than ever before.

    Texts include Graham Greene, The Heart of the Matter (1999), Amma Darko, Beyond the Horizon (1995), Sidney Mintz, Sweetness and Power (1995), and David Harvey, The Enigma of Capital (2011). Evaluation is via three structured concept problems, each a written analysis which includes word work as etymology maps, diagrams, and drafts. Students also present Concept Work and Word Work twice over the quarter. All work accumulates into a portfolio at the end of the quarter. Participation and dialogue are Socratic. While there is no right answer, there are rewards for high levels of participation.

  • Honors 231 B: In Your Name: A Service-Learning Experience in Seattle's Criminal Justice System (I&S)
    SLN 19901 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Claudia Jensen (Slavic Languages & Literature)
    cjensen@uw.edu
    W
    F
    3:30-5:20
    2:30-3:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 10 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Social Science

    As a citizen in Washington State, you select judges and serve as jurors, you pay for police and public defenders, and you buy the razor wire and the food for our prisons. The criminal justice system is truly in your hands and its actions are carried out in your name. This course will explore these responsibilities in two ways. The first is through a series of lectures by specialists at the University and by those involved in Seattle's criminal justice system (police, prosecuting attorneys, defense attorneys, Department of Corrections officials, and others).

    The main focus of the course, however, is the collaboration you will enter into with former prisoners who are students at the Post-Prison Education Program here in Seattle (http://postprisonedu.org/index.php). You and the PPEP students will create projects you will carry out together over the course of Winter Quarter and you'll present your results at the end of the class. Projects will be determined jointly and may cover a variety of media and subjects; all will relate to the criminal justice system and its impact on individuals or the community. Students will also engage in extensive reading and will be responsible for a series of written responses about the readings, the lectures, and their experiences in the collaborative projects.

    NOTE: this class is limited to 10 students; no overloads (if the course is full, you may enroll in Honors 397A, a one-credit course for which you will attend the lectures for one hour per week but will not be engaged in the collaborative projects). Preference will be given to juniors and seniors. Please note that the meeting session on Saturday, Jan. 7 is mandatory. (All of the students in the Post-Prison Education Program are enrolled in area community colleges; this Saturday session will ensure that we can all meet together at least once and it is a crucial aspect of our collaborative work.)

    Honors students are encouraged to pursue receiving Experiential Learning credit for this course (http://depts.washington.edu/uwhonors/reqs/exp/).

  • SIS 201 AI: Making of the 21st Century (I&S)
    SLN 18209 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Jose Lucero (International Studies)

    Phone: 206 616-1643
    jal26@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    1:30-2:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Social Science

    Must be concurrently enrolled in SIS 201 A.

    ADD CODE REQUIRED. Available in MGH 211 October 31.

    Provides a historical understanding of the twentieth century and major global issues today. Focuses on interdisciplinary social science theories, methods, and information relating to global processes and on developing analytical and writing skills to engage complex questions of causation and effects of global events and forces.

    SIS 201 is intended to prepare students to think critically about the world and formulate their own ideas about important international issues. The course covers the major events and trends of the twentieth century, including the world wars and the Cold War, decolonization, democratization, and approaches to economic development; and current issues that stem from twentieth-century processes, such as globalization, failed states, the "war on terror," and changes in the international distribution of power.

    COURSE OBJECTIVES:
    Learn to think critically about complex issues and identify connections between events
    Write an analytical paper that formulates a causal argument about political or social phenomena

    METHOD OF INSTRUCTION:
    Lecture 3 times a week, plus two sections a week.

    RECOMMENDED PREPARATION:
    Reading a newspaper daily.

    COURSE ASSIGNMENTS & GRADING:
    Reading of 150-200 pages per week, several short papers and a longer research paper.
    Several short papers, one research paper, class participation, final exam.

  • SIS 201 AJ: Making of the 21st Century (I&S)
    SLN 18210 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Jose Lucero (International Studies)

    Phone: 206 616-1643
    jal26@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    12:30-1:20
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Honors Civ
    H-Social Science

    Must be concurrently enrolled in SIS 201 A.

    ***COURSE FULL*** Email laurah13@uw.edu to join waitlist.

    Provides a historical understanding of the twentieth century and major global issues today. Focuses on interdisciplinary social science theories, methods, and information relating to global processes and on developing analytical and writing skills to engage complex questions of causation and effects of global events and forces.

    SIS 201 is intended to prepare students to think critically about the world and formulate their own ideas about important international issues. The course covers the major events and trends of the twentieth century, including the world wars and the Cold War, decolonization, democratization, and approaches to economic development; and current issues that stem from twentieth-century processes, such as globalization, failed states, the "war on terror," and changes in the international distribution of power.

    COURSE OBJECTIVES:
    Learn to think critically about complex issues and identify connections between events
    Write an analytical paper that formulates a causal argument about political or social phenomena

    METHOD OF INSTRUCTION:
    Lecture 3 times a week, plus two sections a week.

    RECOMMENDED PREPARATION:
    Reading a newspaper daily.

    COURSE ASSIGNMENTS & GRADING:
    Reading of 150-200 pages per week, several short papers and a longer research paper.
    Several short papers, one research paper, class participation, final exam.

  • Honors 350 A: How to Read, Write & Speak
    SLN 14358 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Eric Liu (Education)
    epliu@msn.com
    W
    1:30-3:20
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 15 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Seminars
    H-Special Topics

    You may think you know how to do these things, but in this fun, practical course you will sharpen your skills in the role of citizen. Students will spend intensive time learning three core skills of engaged citizenship: how to read the media (dissecting text articles and audio/video clips to determine the agendas of the protagonists and of the journalists, to detect bias, to see how issues have been framed); how to write an argument (by composing essays and op-eds on social and political issues and by assessing models of effective written advocacy); and how to deliver a speech (by practicing and getting critiqued on short persuasive speeches). Students will tie all three skills together by working collaboratively on projects that involve them in current civic life and the political process. No special experience required, but a willingness to participate actively and collaboratively is a must.

  • Honors 350 B: Philosophy over Lunch
    SLN 19839 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Ken Clatterbaugh (Philosophy)
    Office: 345B Savery, Box 353350
    Phone: (206) 543-5086
    clatter@u.washington.edu
    Tu
    11:30-1:20
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 15 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Seminars
    H-Special Topics

    This seminar is intended as a reasonably sophisticated introduction to philosophy. The major areas of philosophy, such as philosophy of science, philosophy of mind, ethics, political philosophy, will be covered. When possible guest faculty who are expert in theses areas will be invited. The purpose of the course is to give a student a sense of what goes on in these particular areas of philosophy and an opportunity to engage in a philosophical discussion all while having an appropriately nutritious lunch. The only text will be Simon Blackburn's Think.Grades will be based on participation, which means coming to class having read the material, thought about it, and having something to say about it.

  • Honors 397 A: In Your Name: A Journey through Seattle's Criminal Justice System (I&S)
    SLN 19902 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Claudia Jensen (Slavic Languages & Literature)
    cjensen@uw.edu
    W
    3:30-4:20
    Credits: 1, c/nc
    Limit: 20 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Seminars
    H-Special Topics

    As a citizen in Washington State, you select judges and serve as jurors, you pay for police and public defenders, and you buy the razor wire and the food for our prisons. The criminal justice system is truly in your hands and its actions are carried out in your name. This course will explore these responsibilities through a series of lectures by specialists at the University and by those involved in Seattle's criminal justice system (police, prosecuting attorneys, defense attorneys, Department of Corrections officials, and others). Students will attend a one-hour lecture each week and will be responsible for participation in discussions and for written responses to the lecture and the assigned reading.

    This course is given jointly with Honors 231B, which is a collaborative course with the Post-Prison Education Program, whose students will attend the lectures.

  • Honors 398 A: Exploring the Power of Music
    SLN 14366 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Deborah Pierce (Libraries Odegaard Undergraduate Library)

    Phone: 206 543-4425
    dpierce@u.washington.edu
    TTh
    1:30-2:50
    Credits: 3, c/nc
    Limit: 18 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Seminars
    H-Special Topics

    Music can be heard all over our planet. It finds its place in the chants of a shaman healing their patient, accompanies television commercials to help sell a product, helps create an atmosphere at social events, and accompanies societal rites of passage. Its inspiration can also be found in nature, for example, as a bird singing in our back yard or in the Amazon rainforest. Academically, music weaves its magic into many fields, making it an interdisciplinary powerhouse. It is present from the hard sciences through the most esoteric arts. Examples include recording technology in engineering; the use of music for healing in medicine and psychology; the study of sound production and building of musical instruments in physics; copyright and performance rights in law; and its use as a teaching aid in education.

    In this experiential course we will examine some of the universal themes emerging from the use of music and its influence on humanity and our world. Our ten week journey will utilize various lenses through which we will explore the topic, including scientific and academic research, observation of collective human experience, and your own personal experience both in and outside of class. Our time together will be partially modeled on the goals and objectives of collaborative teaching/learning communities. Activities will include class visits from guest experts and group and individual research opportunities along with weekly musical explorations facilitated by the instructor. During this process we will also examine how it affects and empowers our own lives.

    More about the instructor is available here: http://guides.lib.washington.edu/dpierce

  • Honors 398 B: Cultivating Creativity (VLPA)
    SLN 19780 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Iain Robertson (Landscape Architecture)
    Office: 348F Gould Hall, Box 355734
    Phone: 543-9246
    iainmr@u.washington.edu
    M
    W
    1:30-3:20
    1:30-2:20
    Credits: 3, c/nc
    Limit: 15 students
    Honors Credit Type
    Seminars
    H-Special Topics

    Creativity is neither a body of knowledge nor a specific technique or skill set; rather, it is an attitude of mind. Its 'cultivation' necessarily differs from educational methods used to acquire disciplinary knowledge and skills. Its 'methods' are best described as 'explorations' followed by 'reflection'. The exploration stage of the seminar consists of individual and collective 'exercises' that range from short in-class work to longer individual 'projects'. Exercises explore, and 'cultivate', participants' creativity. Their content is varied and, I trust, engaging, thought-and creativity-provoking, and, possibly, surprising. Reflections, a crucial act of assimilation, that higher education seems unwilling to accommodate in our "busy lives", will be encouraged! Seminar participants will be expected to suspend judgment and take risks wholeheartedly as they engage in activities, discussions and reflections. Without realizing it, we shall work hard and think intensively. The seminar's curriculum, it is hoped, will be 'a mind-altering device' that encourages creative thinking in the sense that Elliot Eisner uses that term in his book The Arts & the Creation of Mind:

    "The point here is that the kind of deliberately designed tasks students are offered in school help define the kind of thinking they will learn to do. The kind of thinking students learn to do will influence what they come to know and the kind of cognitive skills they acquire . . . the curriculum is a mind-altering device . . . Each of the fields or disciplines that students encounter provides a framework, that is, a structure, schema, and theory, through which the worlds is experienced, organized, and understood."
    Through individual and group 'exercises', ranging from short in-class work to longer individual projects, the seminar will explore and 'cultivate' participants' creativity. Students enrolling in the seminar will be expected to suspend judgment and take risks wholeheartedly as they engage in activities, discussions and readings. Without realizing it, we shall work hard and think intensively. The seminar's curriculum, I hope, will be 'a mind-altering device' in Eisner's sense of that term:

    "[T]he kind of deliberately designed tasks students are offered in school help define the kind of thinking they will learn to do. The kind of thinking students learn to do will influence what they come to know and the kind of cognitive skills they acquire. . . the curriculum is a mind-altering device. . . Each of the fields or disciplines that students encounter provides a framework, that is, a structure, schema, and theory, through which the worlds is experienced, organized, and understood." Elliot Eisner, The Arts & the Creation of Mind

    The seminar's goal is to encourage each participant to develop his or her own 'framework', 'structure' or 'schema' for approaching the world with a more creative attitude of mind.

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