Current Honors Courses

Autumn 2014

Except where noted, you are able to register yourself using just the SLN. Please let us know if you have any difficulties at uwhonors@uw.edu.

  • ARCH 350 D: Architecture of the Ancient World (VLPA)
    SLN 10342 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Louisa M. Iarocci (Architecture)

    Phone: 206 221-6046
    liarocci@u.washington.edu
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 20 students

    Students must also register for ARCH 350 DA, Honors lab.

    ADD CODE REQUIRED FOR BOTH LAB AND LECTURE. Available in MGH 211 starting May 5.

    Architectural history in the Western world from beginnings to AD 550.

  • ART 190 A: Introduction to Drawing (VLPA)
    SLN 10430 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Jonathan Happ (School of Art)
    jonathanahapp@gmail.com
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 20 students

    ADD CODE REQUIRED. Available in MGH 211 starting May 5.

    **Remaining spaces reserved for incoming freshmen. Visit MGH 211 to be placed on waitlist.**

    Builds basic drawing skills, develops understanding of primary concepts which relate to drawing and develops an understanding of the grammar or syntax of two-dimensional language. Students move beyond their current knowledge and abilities and link new skills, concepts, and understandings to creative expressing.

  • DXARTS 200 AA: Digital Art and New Media: History, Theory, and Practice (VLPA)
    SLN 13275 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Ed Shanken (DXARTS)

    Phone: 206 221-6085
    eshanken@uw.edu,
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    ADD CODE REQUIRED. Visit MGH 211.

    Students must also register for DXARTS 200 A (lecture).

    We will explore the history, theory and practice of art and electronic media as a 'psychic dress rehearsal for the future' that offers insight into possible trajectories of emerging cultural practices.

    We will examine various technologies, such as electric light, xerography, rapid prototyping, digital computing, telecommunications, the Web, virtual reality, and GPS in terms of their specific characteristics as media. We will equally consider how technologies cannot be separated from the way people use them, the behaviors that emerge, and the dreams (and fears) embedded in them.

    Dr. Shanken's book, Art and Electronic Media (available via course site) will be the course text. Our survey of the field will include writings by curators, theorists, engineers, and artists, and will combine historic primary texts and current literature. In order to foreground conceptual continuities across media, periods, genres and forms, we will take a thematic approach to several topical streams:

    * Motion, Duration, Illumination * Coded Form and Electronic Production * Charged Environments * Networks, Surveillance, Culture Jamming * Bodies, Surrogates, Emergent Systems * Simulations and Simulacra * Exhibitions, Institutions, Communities, Collaborations

    Individual examples and the streams they represent will be subjected to close readings. Students will acquire fluency with methods from art history, media-theory, and media-archaeology, and learn how to apply these methods, traditions, and principles to the analysis of visual culture.

    Throughout the course, students will undertake independent research to write a weekly journal entry and will also respond to each others' writings using the Art and Electronic Media Online Companion (AEM-OC) .

    For more about the course, visit: http://bit.ly/dxarts200f2014

  • Honors 210 A: Feminisms, Fictions, Fashions, and Fabrics: The Cultural Politics of Cloth (VLPA, DIV)
    SLN 15578 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Julia Freeman (School of Art)
    Kathleen Boyd (English)
    k8boyd@u.washington.edu
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students

    No Freshmen.

    Co-facilitated by local artist and UW Art instructor Julia Freeman and activist and UW English Instructor Kate Boyd. This course will explore the gendered and racialized cultural politics of cloth through multiple histories that have been recorded by the evidence of cloth, textile processes and materials choices.

    We will approach reading fiction, creating physical artifacts, multi-media presentations, film and museum visits in a way that seeks to emerge alternative feminist histories, labors and politics of the cloth we wear daily. To analyze and critically respond to the texts, this course will be taught in the art building so that we can create a physical artifacts out of cloth and textile processes. Students will work independently and collaboratively as we participate in the age old activist practice of community building through making a group textile piece.

Interdisciplinary courses may only count for your Interdisciplinary Honors course requirement or your Additional Any courses requirement. These courses cannot count towards your Honors Science, Honors Humanities/Arts or Honors Social Science requirements, even if they bear the corresponding Areas of Knowledge designation. You will earn Areas of Knowledge credit as indicated in the parentheses after each course title.
  • Honors 205 A: What We Know & How We Know It
    SLN 15577 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Frances McCue (Writer in Residence, UW Honors)
    frances@francesmccue.com
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 22 students

    INCOMING FRESHMEN ONLY. Please note that we will be staggering enrollment to ensure equitable access for all summer registration dates.

    This course satisfies BOTH Honors Interdisciplinary AND UW's Composition requirements.

    For freshmen only, this course is an introduction to college-level methods of inquiry. Throughout your academic life at the university, you will be called upon to write, read and converse in order to absorb knowledge and test out ideas. Since academic disciplines are bound by their respective ways of knowing, and because other ways of knowing are empirical and creative, this course will present different ways of coming to knowledge. We'll engage in reading, lectures, dialogue, persuasive writing, journalistic writing, writing for academic papers as well as in creative writing-poems, short stories and vignettes. Expect a lively forum for testing out ideas and a venue to enhance your writing repertoire.

    Expectations for students include: attending all classes with the (substantial) assigned readings completed; contributing to small group presentations; considering one's own belief systems and the belief systems in a respectful and curious manner; being willing to experiment in writing styles and genres. In the end, students should be active questioning learners and show evidence of this engagement.

    Goals for the course include: learning how to negotiate and navigate with different ways of knowing; developing empathic and creative imagination; enhancing student writing; creating models for civic dialogue; and articulating individual learning.

    The course will connect often-separated worlds of research and practice, university and "real world" expertise, and writing and dialogic education.

    This course is the introduction to a year-long sequence-in the winter quarter, the course topic will be "Teaching What We Know" and in the spring, the class will culminate in internships throughout the area. Enrollment in all three terms is not required.

  • Honors 345 A: Pilgrimages and Idle Travels: Travel Writing and Memoir
    SLN 15588 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Frances McCue (Writer in Residence, UW Honors)
    frances@francesmccue.com
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 22 students

    This course satisfies BOTH Honors Interdisciplinary AND UW's Composition requirements.

    Reading, writing and traveling are all acts of the imagination. This course will allow us to "see" the places we've already visited, and imagine the places we plan on visiting. Our workshop will offer the memoirist as well as the returning traveler a way to synthesize her experiences, transforming them into essays, articles, poems or stories. Our time together will help to set a practice for writing and exploring so that a traveler or a memoirist can have a method of documenting her upcoming journey. Our goals include: helping you to keep a fantastic notebook/record of the sights, sounds, smells and impressions of the places you've visited and transform a notebook into a more formal piece of writing. By reading poems, stories, essays and articles that illuminate the art of travel and of recording memories, we'll test out a range of styles and stances. These activities will surface our initial assumptions about what it means to travel as a method of inquiry and imagination, and of acceptance, through places we don't yet know-- or places we have already been.

  • Honors 392 A: The Good Life (I&S / NW)
    SLN 15589 (View Time Schedule info »)

    John Manchak (Philosophy)
    Office: Savery M392, Box 353350
    Phone: 206 616-6093
    manchak@uw.edu
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 20 students

    In this course, we will consider a number of readings considering the big questions in life. What is meaningful? What is happiness? What is love? What is death? We start with the wisdom of ancient philosophy. We then move throughout history, examining relevant religious, moral, aesthetic, and scientific themes. Class will be discussion based. Requirements include class participation and daily journal writing.

  • Honors 394 A: Philosophy of Gender in Western Thought (VLPA / I&S, DIV)
    SLN 15590 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Clare Bright (Gender Studies (GWSS))
    Office: B-110 Padelford, Box 354345
    Phone: (206) 543-6900
    cbright@u.washington.edu
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students

    An exploration and critique of the dominant themes and paradigms which have shaped Western European thought, with special focus on concepts of "woman" and "man." Theories of knowledge and reality will also be covered. Feminist perspectives will be studied along with more traditional viewpoints.

    COURSE OBJECTIVES
    - To provide an overview of the dominant philosophical paradigms in western thought To assess such paradigms critically, especially from feminist perspectives
    - To become familiar with concepts of major thinkers regarding gender, "woman" and "man,"
    - To analyze the social and metaphysical contexts for these definitions
    - To develop the student's ability to analyze and formulate theory
    - To facilitate the thoughtful verbal and written expression of knowledge gained this term, including material suitable for your portfolios

    REQUIRED READINGS
    Riane Eisler, The Chalice and the Blade
    Plato, The Republic
    The Bible (A version of your choice)
    Woman in Western Thought (Reading Packet #1)
    Reading Packet #2
    (Both Reading Packets available at Professional Copy, 42nd & 15th Ave NE)

    COURSE REQUIREMENTS
    - Class Participation (30%): Students are expected to be at all class sessions and to be prepared for class discussion. This means studying the readings for the unit scheduled and coming to class with ideas to share. *Acceptable participation includes both thoughtful comments and active, respectful listening, as well as an appropriate balance between them.* One absence is permitted without affecting your participation grade.
    - Two Take-home essay assignments (20% each)
    - Group Project (15%)
    - Final Exam (15%): An in-class comprehensive exam
    - Class Partner: Someone with whom you exchange contact information.

  • Honors 394 B: Puget Sounds: Music History, Criticism, and Archiving in the Pacific NW (VLPA / I&S)
    SLN 15591 (View Time Schedule info »)

    John Vallier (Libraries Media Center - Odegaard)

    Phone: 206 616-1210
    vallier@uw.edu
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    What does Puget Sound music sound like? Does music from Seattle have a particular sonic signature? What ideological, political, and cultural currents have influenced the development of music in our region? What music has been left out of our region's official musical narrative? What can YOU do to document and give voice to these musics in order to ensure they will live on for future generations to discover?

    This class is an interdisciplinary mix, one that blends elements of ethnomusicology, music history/criticism, and archival studies. In it you will learn about the history of music in the Puget Sound region, become familiar with approaches to music criticism, and develop techniques for building your own music collection. At the core of the class is a growing archive of regional music recordings held by the UW Libraries. Called Puget Sounds, this archive documents music across genres, from folk to rock, jazz to classical, and includes both published and unpublished recordings (e.g., the Crocodile Cafe Collection, Vera Project Collection, more...). By the end quarter you will make contributions to the Puget Sounds Archive by way of creating new collections through original fieldwork and/or archiving legacy music collections. Student goals include...

    • Developing a broader knowledge and appreciation of the plurality of music in the greater Seattle region;
    • Forming a nuanced and critically informed understanding of what we mean by the term music;
    • Building an understanding of archival and ethnomusicological issues and techniques, particularly as they apply to the collection, preservation, and interpretation of music;
    • Building confidence with contributing to discussions in a seminar type setting;
    • Learning how to make live field recordings.

    No formal music training or knowledge is necessary. Everyone is welcome.

    (Website from 2012 version of the course is available here: guides.lib.washington.edu/honors394b)

  • Honors 394 C: Universal and Culture Specific Aspects of Meaning (VLPA / I&S)
    SLN 15592 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Katarzyna Dziwirek (Slavic Languages and Literatures)
    Office: M260 Smith, Box 353580
    Phone: 543-7691
    dziwirek@u.washington.edu
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    The focus of the course is the social and cultural conditioning of everyday language use. It's goal is to examine what is universal and what culture/language specific in linguistic expression of key human concepts: friendship, kinship, homeland/fatherland as well as linguistic expression of politeness/rudeness and prejudice, and to take a closer look at linguistic expression of gender differences in different cultures. The underlying premise is that language is a mirror of culture and national character, as well as means of communication. Students will be introduced to research methods in semantics, pragmatics and discourse and, hopefully, gain an appreciation of the social and cultural underpinnings of their own language and other languages. This is a comparative course, with enough Slavic content for it to be relevant for our majors and graduate students, yet appealing to people interested in other languages or language in general. Students can choose any language/culture for their projects, which include three short reflections and a final term paper.

    For more about this course, view this video course description from Prof Dziwirek:

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/nia8ka7zqx66a2e/Slavic_Katarzyna_Aut14.mp4?n=45587939

  • CHEM 145 A: Honors General Chemistry (NW)
    SLN 12132 (View Time Schedule info »)

    William Reinhardt (Chemistry, Physics)
    Office: 305A Bagley Hall, Box 351700
    Phone: 206 543-0578
    rein@chem.washington.edu
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 96 students

    To register:
    1) Take a placement test through Office of Educational Assessment, 440 Schmitz Hall, 206.543.1170, http://www.washington.edu/oea/testctr.htm OR use AP (3,4,5) or IB (5,6,7) scores as placement.

    2) Contact the Chemistry advisers: Mary Harty or Lani Stone, 206.543.1610 or Bagley Hall 303.

    Must also register for CHEM 145 AA, AB or AC.

    Honors Chem 145 and 155 cover material in 142, 152, and 162. Includes laboratory. No more than the number of credits indicated can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: 142, 145 (5 credits); 145, 155, 162 (10 credits).

  • CHEM 335 A: Honors Organic Chemistry (NW)
    SLN 12243 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Credits: 4
    Limit: 70 students

    To register students must see a Chemistry adviser, Mary Harty or Lani Stone, in Bagley Hall 303 for entry code. 206.543.1610.
    Prerequisite: either CHEM 155 or CHEM 162

    For chemistry majors and otherwise qualified students planning three or more quarters of organic chemistry. Structure, nomenclature, reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Theory and mechanism of organic reactions. Studies of biomolecules. No organic laboratory accompanies this course. No more than 5 credits can be counted toward graduation from the following course groups: 221, 223, 237, 335.

  • CHEM 475 A: Honors Physical Chemistry (NW)
    SLN 12260 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Credits: 3
    Limit: 12 students

    Entry code available from Chemistry advisers, Mary Harty or Lani Stone, 206.543.1610 or Bagley Hall 303.

    Introduction to quantum chemistry, spectroscopy. Theory of quantum mechanics applied more rigorously than in CHEM 455. Application of quantum mechanics to electronic structure of atoms and molecules. Computer software used to solve problems. Prerequisite: either CHEM 155 or CHEM 162; either MATH 126 or MATH 136; either PHYS 116 or PHYS 123; recommended: MATH 307; MATH 308.

  • CSE 142: Computer Programming I (NW)
    SLN ?

    Hélène Martin (Computer Science & Engineering)

    Credits: 4
    Limit: 30 students

    To earn Honors credit, students must register for:
    1. CSE 142 lecture A or B
    2. corresponding CSE 142 section
    3. CSE 390 H
    AND
    4. CSE 390 HA

    See Time Schedule for course day, time and SLN for both lecture and CSE 390.

    Basic programming-in-the-small abilities and concepts including procedural programming (methods, parameters, return values) , basic control structures (sequence, if/else, for loop, while loop), file processing, arrays and an introduction to defining objects.

  • CSE 143: Computer Programming II (NW)
    SLN ?

    Allison Obourn (Computer Science & Engineering)
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 50 students

    To earn Honors credit, students must register for:
    1. CSE 143 A
    2. corresponding CSE 143 section (AA - AQ)
    3. CSE 390 H
    AND
    4. CSE 390 HB / OR / CSE 390 HE

    See Time Schedule for course day, time and SLN for both lecture and CSE 390.

    Continuation of CSE 142. Concepts of data abstraction and encapsulation including stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, recursion, instruction to complexity and use of predefined collection classes. Prerequisite: CSE 142.

  • Honors 220 A: Storytelling in the Sciences (NW)
    SLN 15579 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Oliver Fraser (Astronomy)

    ojf@astro.washington.edu
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 20 students

    Clear and accurate science communication is very important as we seek to understand our world and its changes. In this course students will create and tell stories that reflect their own love and appreciation of nature and science, in the context of a larger world that needs their expertise.

    The first set of stories will be drawn from Astronomy, Earth Science, and other fields that lend themselves to presentation in the UW's digital planetarium. The remaining two story assignments allow students the freedom to choose the topic and media. Student's will develop their digital storytelling skills through skill development assignments and work shopping their ideas in class.

  • Honors 220 B: Public Policy Using A Benefit-Cost Analysis Approach (NW)
    SLN 15580 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Richard Zerbe (Evans School of Public Affairs)
    Office: Rm 226 Parrington Hall, Box 353055
    Phone: 206 616-5470
    zerbe@u.washington.edu
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students

    This course will consider several important pending or current public policy decisions. These will be considered from the perspective of Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA), or Benefit -Cost Analysis (BCA), with its companion risk analysis. Aside from politics this is the dominant e paradigm for government decisions . BCA is widely used, especially by the Federal Government, but also by state and local governments. BCA can be regarded as both a science and an art. For sophisticated analysts it is clearly both. The subject is extremely rich and can be approached on many different levels, both in terms of technique and philosophy.

    Grades:
    The grades will be based on problem sets, class discussion, a mid-term and a team paper. The problems sets are take-home open book exercises. You may confer on these problems with the grader and with fellow students but cannot copy answers from others. Problem sets will be 30% of grade , the mid-term 20% and the paper 50%. A copy of some of the papers you can critique will be available in Odegaard Library. You are not limited to these papers. They are primarily from Brent's (editor). The difficulty of the reading materials is variable but is in any event at professional level.

    Textbooks:
    There is one required textbook and one recommended:
    1. Required R. Zerbe and D. Dively, Benefit Cost Analysis in Theory and Practice, Harper Collins, 1994. (This is out of print but a copy is available from the University Bookstore or on-line on the course website.
    2. There will be a reading packet, which is also available from the University Bookstore.

    Websites:
    The course website is: https://catalysttools.washington.edu/workspace/evansas/1845

    A web site that did have free access to Crystal Ball is: http://www.montecarlito.com/

  • MATH 124 H: Honors Calculus with Analytical Geometry (NW)
    SLN 17461 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Credits: 5
    Limit: 60 students

    To register, contact Math advisers: advising@math.washington.edu or C 36 Padelford Hall.

    Students must also register for quiz section HA or HB; see time schedule for more information.

    First quarter in calculus of functions of a single variable. Emphasizes differential calculus. Emphasizes applications and problem solving using the tools of calculus. Prerequisite: 2.5 in MATH 120, score of 68% on MATHPC placement test, score of 75% on MATHEC placement test, or score of 2 on AP test.

  • MATH 134 A: Accelerated (Honors) Calculus (NW)
    SLN 17563 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Ebru Bekyel (Mathematics)
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    To register, speak with Math Department adviser Brooke Miller via phone or in person: 206.543.6830 or C-36 Padelford.

    First quarter of a sequence; sequence covers the material of 124, 125, 126; 307, 308, 318. First year of a two-year accelerated sequence. May receive advanced placement (AP) credit for 124 after taking 134. For students with above average preparation, interest, and ability in mathematics.

  • MATH 334 A: Accelerated Honors Advanced Calculus (NW)
    SLN 17617 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Credits: 5
    Limit: 40 students

    Prerequisite: either 2.0 in MATH 136, or 2.0 in MATH 126; 2.0 in MATH 307; either 2.0 in MATH 205, 2.0 in MATH 308, or 2.0 in MATH 318.

    Introduction to proofs and rigor; uniform convergence, Fourier series and partial differential equations, vector calculus, complex variables. Students who complete this sequence are not required to take MATH 309, 310, 324, 326, 327, 328, and 427. Second year of an accelerated two-year sequence; prepares students for senior-level mathematics courses.

  • PHYS 121 B: Honors Physics: Mechanics (NW)
    SLN 19521 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Alejandro Garcia (Physics)
    Office: C529 Physics-Astonomy Bldg, Box 354290
    Phone: 616-2875
    agarcia3@u.washington.edu
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 66 students

    Prerequisite: MATH 124, 127, 134, or 145, may be taken concurrently; recommended: one year HS physics.

    Students must also sign up for an Honors tutorial section and a lab.

    Email margot@phys.washington.edu to enroll.

    Basic principles of mechanics and experiments in mechanics for physical science and engineering majors. Lecture tutorial and lab components must all be taken to receive credit. Credit is not given for both PHYS 114 and PHYS 121.

  • Honors 230 A: Geographies of Peace and Violence: Critical Examinations of Power, Conflict, and Structural Inequalities (I&S, DIV)
    SLN 15582 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Amy Piedalue (Geography)

    Phone: 685-1090
    amer@u.washington.edu
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 35 students

    This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of violence acrossa range of scales and formations. At the same time, we will explore peace as a process actively produced not only in response to violence, but also in the absence of violence or as a preventive mechanism. We will consider theories of peace and violence drawn from geography, anthropology, political science, social work, philosophy, psychology, literary theory, postcolonial and feminist theory, and history. Theoretical approaches will be paired with empirical studies, community-based research findings, and creative mediums (i.e. art, music, and creative writing), to examine the following areas: definitions and typologies of 'violence' and 'peace'; structural and systemic violence; (post)colonialism; terrorism, counter-terrorism, and peace; inter-community conflict and peace initiatives; crime, homelessness, and security/surveillance; domestic violence & peace building in families; self and subjectivity, inner-peace and internalized oppression. Other themes that will emerge across these weeks include: (im)migration, poverty, global health, development, race/racism, gender, decolonization, and human rights.

    Over the course of the quarter, students will be expected to make connections between the theories and empirical examples we engage, and thus to map and make sense of the linkages between various forms of violence and peace at different scales and sites. Weekly writing assignments will be used to draw out students' critical reflection, and class-time will be discussion driven. Most students in the class will participate in service learning. Those who are not able to do service will undertake research on a peace or anti-violence initiative of their choice, preferably one with a Seattle connection so that they can include a site visit or interview in their research. Final class projects will revolve around the service or research work and students will present their findings and reflections in the last weeks of the quarter. Students will be required to include an artifact and annotation from this project in their Honors Portfolios, and thus have the opportunity to develop this with peer and instructor support.

    In their weekly assignments, quarter-long projects, and final presentations, students are encouraged to express their ideas creatively and in a manner that captures their own voice (for example, through the use of art, music, film, creative writing and digital platforms).

    NOTE - UPDATE:
    In preparation for our fall course, please read George Orwell's 1984. Even if you have read the book in the past, I ask that you read it again specifically for this course. During our study of 'Geographies of Peace and Violence' this autumn, we will examine how 'peace' and 'violence' are deployed as ideas within accounts of historical and contemporary events, as well as the complex meanings assigned to these terms within varying contexts. Please read 1984 with a critical eye to the different roles that peace and violence play in Orwell's story. What meanings are assigned to the terms? How does Orwell craft his story to reveal dynamics of violence that are otherwise unspoken or less visible? How are these two concepts/terms of peace and violence used by the government in Orwell's fictional account? Do you see any parallels in our contemporary world? How does Orwell's account complicate the notion that peace is necessarily an antidote to, or the antithesis of, violence?

    Prior to our first day of class (Thurs. Sept. 25th), please read the book and take some notes on the questions above. During our first week of class, you will be given a short writing assignment asking you to reflect on peace & violence in Orwell's story and to begin connecting this with our course themes.

  • Honors 230 B: Rhetoric and Debate: race, class, gender and public debate (I&S, DIV)
    SLN 15583 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Mick Souders (Communication)

    Phone: 206 616-9761
    souders@uw.edu
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    This course takes on debate-an immediate exchange of argument over a proposition-as a method of teaching and learning about issues of race, class and gender in contemporary society. The course will take will be divided into four sections. We will begin by exploring how debate and argument are effective methods of establishing knowledge and teaching about issues. After a core establishment of ideas and skills, the next three sections focus on issues of race, gender, and class by debating over political, social, and philosophical issues related to each subject. Class readings will focus on the philosophy of disputation, principles of debating and establishing background for active debates. Debates will be conducted both in person and online.

  • Honors 230 C: Understanding and Combating Human Trafficking (I&S, DIV)
    SLN 15584 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Kirsten Foot (Communications)
    Office: 102 Communications Bldg, Box 353740
    Phone: 543-4837
    kfoot@u.washington.edu
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 30 students

    This course has 3 aims: 1) To introduce students to contemporary human trafficking as one of the darkest sides of globalization, and also in relation to historical forms of slavery, issues of human rights, international migration and trade/labor flows, and socioeconomic conditions that give rise to the commodification of some people by other people; 2) To build students' understanding of the scope, scale, and complex dynamics of human trafficking; 3) To equip students to assess the current state of anti-human trafficking efforts with appreciation for the difficulty of such efforts, and to strategize better ways to combat human trafficking.

    These aims will be accomplished through a) reading, written analyses, and in-class discussions of relevant texts produced by concerned government bodies and nongovernmental organizations as well as scholars; b) visits by local experts representing local and/or national law enforcement, providers of services to trafficking victims, and community organizers; c) written analyses of case studies and a research paper on a particular aspect of the problem of human trafficking and/or efforts to combat it; d) completion of an experiential learning/service learning assignment which will require a total of about 20 hours of volunteer work with Seattle Against Slavery during the last five weeks of the course. Most of this experiential/service learning will take place in the U District; no travel will be necessary. There will be a few quizzes on key terms and concepts, but no midterm nor final exam.

  • JSIS 200 AI: States and Capitalism: The Origins of the Modern Global System (I&S)
    SLN 16349 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Anand Yang (International Studies, History)

    Phone: 206 543-4902
    aay@u.washington.edu
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 22 students

    Students must also register for JSIS 200 A.

    ADD CODE REQUIRED. Available in MGH 211 as of May 5.

    Origins of the modern world system in the sixteenth century and its history until World War I. Interacting forces of politics and economics around the globe, with particular attention to key periods of expansion and crisis.

  • Law 100 H: Introduction to American Law (I&S)
    SLN 22619 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Theodore Myhre (School of Law)

    Phone: 206 685-7914
    tmyhre@u.washington.edu
    Credits: 5
    Limit: 25 students

    ADD CODE REQUIRED. Visit MGH 211.

    Examines the structure of the American legal system and how laws are made. Surveys key doctrinal areas of the law learning fundamental legal concepts, and explore how the law functions and evolves over time, including legal issues and decision-making related to statutory or common law.

  • ENGL 281 A: Intermediate Expository Writing
    SLN 14070 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Credits: 5
    Limit: 22 students

    This course does NOT satisfy Honors credit, but fulfills your UW Composition requirement.

    ADD CODE REQUIRED. Available in MGH 211 as of May 5.

    This course will introduce students to the field of writing studies and ask them to perform primary research on writing in a discipline or professional field of interest. We will be reading texts written by professional writing researchers and scholars in order to understand how writing is studied. These texts will be useful models for students' own research projects in the class. Early in the quarter, students will choose a writing research topic related to their future areas of study and conduct scholarly research as well as interviews, observations, or surveys relating to their topic. Course assignments will provide opportunities for students to explore their topics in a number of ways and will build towards a final research paper or project in the class. The goal is for students to develop a broad understanding of how writing works and is studied, as well as specific knowledge about writing's role in their future work in the university and beyond.

  • Honors 100 A: Introduction to Honors Education
    SLN 15555 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Laura Harrington (Honors)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
    Phone: 205 543-7444
    laurah13@uw.edu
    Aley Willis (Honors Program)
    Office: 211 Mary Gates Hall, Box 352800
    Phone: 221-6074
    aleym@u.washington.edu
    Brook Kelly (Honors)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
    Phone: 221.6131
    bbkelly@u.washington.edu
    Credits: 1
    Limit: 125 students

    Required for first quarter Honors students.

    Students must also register for a section, AA-AJ. Students will attend EITHER lecture or section each week.

    HONORS 100 brings first quarter Interdisciplinary Honors students together for a common experience in order to introduce the value of interdisciplinary education and the importance of the integration of knowledge, as well as to help you form connections with your peers and other members of the Honors community. This course is also an introduction to the Honors core curriculum and requirements, with the goal of helping students imagine moving your work beyond the classroom into areas such as research, leadership, community and, ultimately, both local and global engagement.

    HONORS 100 will have three larger lecture meetings throughout the quarter; during the rest of the quarter you will meet in small sections led by a Peer Educator, with a small group of other first year Honors students. The lectures will serve as an opportunity to meet others in the Honors community and to acquire a common grounding in the goals and values of the Honors Program; the sections will provide students with a smaller peer cohort, a current student mentor in the form of their HONORS 100 PE, and a chance to get to know the many opportunities of the Honors Program on a personal level.

    Additionally, throughout the quarter you will also get to:
    - Meet a few of the many Honors faculty, who will discuss how they came to study what they do, how they gather evidence and resources in their respective disciplines, and why they teach what they do;
    - Meet a few of the Honors Librarians, who will serve as a connection to the University Libraries and as resources for your research needs; and
    - Create your Honors Portfolio and learn how to engage in at least two experiential learning projects during your time at the UW. The portfolio process emphasizes critical reflection of your learning experiences, both inside and outside of the traditional classroom.

  • Honors 100 B: Introduction to Honors Education
    SLN 15566 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Laura Harrington (Honors)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
    Phone: 205 543-7444
    laurah13@uw.edu
    Brook Kelly (Honors)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
    Phone: 221.6131
    bbkelly@u.washington.edu
    Aley Willis (Honors Program)
    Office: 211 Mary Gates Hall, Box 352800
    Phone: 221-6074
    aleym@u.washington.edu
    Credits: 1
    Limit: 125 students

    Required for first quarter Honors students.

    Students must also register for a section, BA-BJ. Students will attend EITHER lecture or section each week.

    HONORS 100 brings first quarter Interdisciplinary Honors students together for a common experience in order to introduce the value of interdisciplinary education and the importance of the integration of knowledge, as well as to help you form connections with your peers and other members of the Honors community. This course is also an introduction to the Honors core curriculum and requirements, with the goal of helping students imagine moving your work beyond the classroom into areas such as research, leadership, community and, ultimately, both local and global engagement.

    HONORS 100 will have three larger lecture meetings throughout the quarter; during the rest of the quarter you will meet in small sections led by a Peer Educator, with a small group of other first year Honors students. The lectures will serve as an opportunity to meet others in the Honors community and to acquire a common grounding in the goals and values of the Honors Program; the sections will provide students with a smaller peer cohort, a current student mentor in the form of their HONORS 100 PE, and a chance to get to know the many opportunities of the Honors Program on a personal level.

    Additionally, throughout the quarter you will also get to:
    - Meet a few of the many Honors faculty, who will discuss how they came to study what they do, how they gather evidence and resources in their respective disciplines, and why they teach what they do;
    - Meet a few of the Honors Librarians, who will serve as a connection to the University Libraries and as resources for your research needs; and
    - Create your Honors Portfolio and learn how to engage in at least two experiential learning projects during your time at the UW. The portfolio process emphasizes critical reflection of your learning experiences, both inside and outside of the traditional classroom.

  • Honors 350 B: Driving Education Change (I&S)
    SLN 22610 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Jeanne Contardo (Education Consultant, Honors Alum)
    Credits: 2, c/nc
    Limit: 18 students

    This course will take place online, with two in-person meetings (dates & times TBD).

    K-12 and postsecondary education have been soundly criticized for not achieving the outcomes believed necessary for the economic competitiveness of this country. At the same time, a growing body of leaders from all sectors-business, government, and nonprofit-are recognizing that the education sector cannot tackle its challenges alone. This class will explore both the process of building education-focused cross sector partnerships as well as the substance of these efforts. Participants will leave with an understanding of how diverse stakeholders are becoming involved in these initiatives, and the ways in which enterprising regions are tackling their persistent education challenges.

    Readings will include strategic plans from non-profit entities engaged in education reform, regional and state dashboards and report cards, materials on the Common Core, peer reviewed journal articles on Collective Impact, and contemporary news sources (newspapers and magazine articles, blogs, etc).

  • Honors 397 A: Honors 100 Peer Education Seminar (I&S)
    SLN 15593 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Aley Willis (Honors Program)
    Office: 211 Mary Gates Hall, Box 352800
    Phone: 221-6074
    aleym@u.washington.edu
    Brook Kelly (Honors)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
    Phone: 221.6131
    bbkelly@u.washington.edu
    Laura Harrington (Honors)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
    Phone: 205 543-7444
    laurah13@uw.edu
    Credits: 1, c/nc
    Limit: 25 students

    For Honors 100 Peer Educators only.

    Monday PEs, please register for Honors 397 AA as well. Tuesday PEs, please register for Honors 397 AB.

  • Honors 397 B: Leadership Towards a Caring Community--Omoiyari no aru kokusai shakai ni mukete no ridashippu (I&S)
    SLN 23106 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Ed Taylor (Educational Leadership & Policy Studies, Undergraduate Academic Affairs)
    Office: 220 Mary Gates Hall, Box 352800
    Phone: 206 616-7175
    edtaylor@u.washington.edu
    Credits: 1
    Limit: 12 students

    This seminar is limited to 12 students. Students who are seriously interested in applying for the Waseda Global Leadership Program are strongly encouraged to enroll in this preparatory seminar. Honors Program Waseda (Tokyo) exchange students enrolled at the UW during the 2014-2015 academic year will join the seminar.

    NOTE: this seminar does NOT fulfill any Interdisciplinary Honors Core course requirements, as it is only 1 credit.

    The purpose of the US-Japan Leadership seminar, is to shape and hone an understanding of leadership, friendship, and a caring community among the next generation of leaders in each country. The relationship between two of the world's most powerful democracies and economies has become complex and multilayered, transcends boundaries and demands consideration of global issues, understanding of the self and others. Yet, we to suffer from misunderstandings, neglect or stereotyped images of each other that arise from our very distinct histories and cultures.

    The seminar aims to foster dialogue among future leaders across areas of study. The seminar will bring students together to discuss leadership, citizenship, historical and current issues in bilateral relations, as well as issues reaching beyond our two countries. Students will engage in serious conversation along with shared cultural experiences and to nurture lifelong friendships. The overall goal of the seminar is to take steps toward the formation of leadership for a more caring global community-- Omoiyari no aru kokusai shakai ni mukete no ridashippu.

    More at http://depts.washington.edu/uwhonors/international/waseda/

  • Honors 398 A: So...tell me about yourself! (VLPA)
    SLN 22656 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Kathryn Mobrand (Human Centered Design & Engineering)
    Office: 205 Engineering Annex, Box 352183
    Phone: 206 616-8242
    kmobrand@uw.edu
    Credits: 1, c/nc
    Limit: 12 students

    No freshmen.

    NOTE: This seminar does NOT fulfill any Interdisciplinary Honors Core course requirements, as it is only 1 credit.

    Have you ever wished that you could speak more comfortably and effectively about your accomplishments, skills, values, and interests? In this one-credit seminar, you will learn strategies for speaking effectively in a wide variety of contexts: proposing project ideas, presenting final reports of theses, talking audiences through posters or portfolios, or convincing someone you are the best candidate for the job.

    In this studio seminar, you will have multiple opportunities to participate in workshops and to practice different speaking genres-from elevator pitches to formal presentations. Bring content about you and your accomplishments, and learn to present it effectively!

  • Honors 496 A: Integration of the Honors Core Curriculum
    SLN 15596 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Julie Villegas (UW Honors)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
    Phone: 543-7172
    villegas@u.washington.edu
    Credits: 1
    Limit: 15 students

    To register, fill out this online survey:
    http://tinyurl.com/jvjmngw

  • Honors 496 B: Integration of the Honors Core Curriculum
    SLN 15597 (View Time Schedule info »)

    Julie Villegas (UW Honors)
    Office: MGH 211, Box 352800
    Phone: 543-7172
    villegas@u.washington.edu
    Credits: 1
    Limit: 15 students

    To register, fill out this online survey:
    http://tinyurl.com/jvjmngw

A unit within Undergraduate Academic Affairs
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